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By PETER SCHMUCK | May 1, 2005
I'M NEVER GOING on vacation again. Every time I take time off, something happens that needs to be properly addressed in the Kickoff section, and God forbid Ray Frager try to do it. I'm referring, of course, to the attack of the tennis-playing bison. I was sitting at the breakfast table Wednesday morning and right there on the front page of The Sun was a photo of a small herd of bison - I prefer to call them buffalo, but apparently there is some subtle difference - congregating on a tennis court in Pikesville.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
President Barack Obama seems to be having quite a difficult time trying to find shelter for the thousands of immigrant children who have swarmed into our country ( "U.S. considering new Md. sites for immigrant children," June 17). His administration has been met with nothing but disappointment and defiant opposition from representatives and citizens from Maryland, Indiana, Oklahoma and Virginia. I don't quite understand why finding shelter for the children is so mind-boggling for someone as bright as President Obama.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- Nowhere is tradition held more dear than here at the All England Club, but even Wimbledon is not immune to the pressures of expansion and big business.Because of that, the most intimate court in pro tennis, the No. 1 Court, which has been home to Wimbledon, Wightman Cup and Davis Cup matches and provided tennis fans with some of the sport's most exciting, dramatic and notorious moments, will be jackhammered into extinction next month.But no one can erase the memories that have been created over its 72 years.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2000
It was love at first sight. Don and Carole Fortney met 11 years ago at a tennis match. He's a microbiologist. She works for the Social Security Administration. Both were avid tennis players, so a mutual friend introduced them at an exhibition at Greenspring Valley Tennis Club. A courtship quickly followed. When they married a year later, the couple chose to tie the knot on the tennis court. Both wore their tennis whites: he in shorts and an athletic shirt, she in a white tennis dress and a veil.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1994
According to county zoning regulations, a homeowner can build a tennis court on the front lawn regardless of how annoying it is to neighbors across the street.But start giving tennis lessons on that court and those neighbors can cause you trouble.Robert Anderman learned that lesson the hard way after building a tennis court and then giving tennis lessons on the front of his 3-acre parcel off Route 97 in Glenwood.The regulations say he can build a tennis court for his own personal use on his lot even if his neighbors across the street may be annoyed.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 21, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Campaign Notebook:Nothing happens by accident on the Bill Clinton campaign.So when Clinton showed up in Watts to give a speech, I noted that he wore a gray suit, white shirt and maroon striped tie.At his next stop about a half-hour later in front of a Latino group celebrating Mexican Independence Day, I was surprised to see Clinton emerge from his limo now wearing a blue shirt and yellow striped tie.And at his last stop, at a posh Beverly Hills...
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
With the help of most of his neighbors, Robert Anderman should be able to bounce back to teaching tennis in the front yard of his Glenwood home -- but within strict limits.Mr. Anderman, whose front-yard tennis court was allowed by county zoning regulations but annoying to his neighbors across the street, was hit with a zoning violation when his neighbors determined that he was teaching tennis on the court.But earlier this week, Mr. Anderman won a unanimous Board of Appeals vote to grant him a special zoning exception for tennis instruction with 13 conditions.
NEWS
December 25, 2002
Charles Martin Hughes, who taught math for 23 years at Essex Community College and was co-chairman of the Maryland State Tennis Tournament, died Monday of complications from colon cancer at Beverly Healthcare in Doylestown, Pa. He was 81. Mr. Hughes published books on mathematics and on his experience in World War II, but his passion was tennis, his family said. He played until a year before his death, often beating players decades younger. "He had a tremendous sense of humor, and as he was getting older, he would use that to his advantage on the tennis court," said daughter Molly Hughes of Charleston, S.C. "He would hobble out onto the court, and then beat players in their 20s and 30s."
SPORTS
By Paul Pierre-Louis, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The tennis courts at The Suburban Club in Pikesville are typically empty during weekday afternoons, with many of the usual patrons busy at work until they can head to the country club for some exercise. It was in this solitude, on a partly cloudy Monday earlier this month, that Xander Centenari slogged through a practice match, striking balls with a powerful forehand stroke when he saw an opportunity to win a point. Unlike other club members, Centenari doesn't have to budget time between work and tennis.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Carlton H. Dotson, a retired spokesman for the Maryland State Lottery and a tennis player who helped integrate the Druid Hill Park tennis courts in the late 1940s, died of complications from a stroke Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital. A resident of Eutaw Place in Reservoir Hill, he was 82. Born in Baltimore and known as "Yummy," he was raised on Madison Avenue near Druid Hill Park. He was the son of Charles Edward "Blue" Dotson, a maitre d'hotel and Miller Bros. Restaurant bartender, and Lucille Harde, a homemaker.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
Herb Kasoff is an enthusiastic financial backer of Baltimore's charities who dislikes the overhead expenses associated with traditional fundraising. Each year, Kasoff writes a check to pay for a tennis tournament and country club dinner attended by dozens of guests who, in turn, make out their own checks made payable directly to the charity. He promotes the event with fliers that state, "100 percent of the proceeds go to charity. " "I like to bring people together to have a good time," he said one day last week at his Brooklandville home.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
Led by sophomore Felix Hong, Severn's tennis team opened its defense of the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association B Conference title Thursday with a 5-0 victory over Annapolis Area Christian School at Anne Arundel Community College. Hong, who was the B Conference singles champion last spring, swept the Eagles' Adam Sheir in straight sets, 6-0, 6-0. Hong, who has a 4.0 grade point average and counts chess, drawing and fitness among his interests, wants to pursue a career in architecture and said chess helps his tennis game "with the strategy tactics and my mental aspect."
NEWS
By LUKE BROADWATER and LUKE BROADWATER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2006
Entering her freshman year at Arundel, tennis player Amy Olson didn't know what to expect. She knew that Anne Arundel County competition was filled with solid, older players. She also knew that tennis wasn't her main sport. So Olson didn't see herself being a threat to take the county championship. But then she started to win. "People would tell me when I was going to play somebody good," said Olson, now a sophomore for the Wildcats. "Because I was a freshman, the other players didn't know anything about me. They weren't ready to play a tough match.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Residents along Bomont Road in Timonium were never keen on sharing their street with tennis courts. But more than a decade ago, they agreed with the Baltimore Country Club to drop their opposition to the idea provided the club limited the number of new courts to nine. Yesterday, the county Board of Appeals ruled that the country club must abide by that agreement, overriding the club's latest plan for 12 courts. "It's a very important case for community associations," said J. Carroll Holzer, representing Bomont Road residents.
FEATURES
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Royal Weaver took a stand, 47 years ago, on a tennis court in Druid Hill Park in Baltimore. On July 11, 1948, he and a group of fellow tennis players played a match aimed at ending segregation.Any number of events in which African-Americans pressed for equal treatment after slavery could be called the beginning of the civil rights movement. This occasion was six years before the Brown vs. Board of Education decision, seven years before the bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala.The protest in Druid Hill Park challenged the city's segregation laws and became the subject of a column by H. L. Mencken.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
President Barack Obama seems to be having quite a difficult time trying to find shelter for the thousands of immigrant children who have swarmed into our country ( "U.S. considering new Md. sites for immigrant children," June 17). His administration has been met with nothing but disappointment and defiant opposition from representatives and citizens from Maryland, Indiana, Oklahoma and Virginia. I don't quite understand why finding shelter for the children is so mind-boggling for someone as bright as President Obama.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2005
Now that the weather is cooperating, I've been jogging outside and playing a lot of tennis. Yesterday I was on the tennis court when the outside of my left knee, on the back of my leg, began really hurting. What happened? "Pain in the back of the knee reflects what's happening in the front of the knee," says Dr. Michael Mont, director of the Center for Joint Preservation & Reconstruction at the Rubin Institute for Orthopedics at Sinai Hospital. You may have injured your lateral collateral ligament - LCL - which provides stability to the outer part of the knee.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 1, 2005
I'M NEVER GOING on vacation again. Every time I take time off, something happens that needs to be properly addressed in the Kickoff section, and God forbid Ray Frager try to do it. I'm referring, of course, to the attack of the tennis-playing bison. I was sitting at the breakfast table Wednesday morning and right there on the front page of The Sun was a photo of a small herd of bison - I prefer to call them buffalo, but apparently there is some subtle difference - congregating on a tennis court in Pikesville.
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