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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
One of my favorite Cameron Indoor Stadium memories came on one of my first trips, back in 1986. I came for a game a couple of days before North Carolina was going to open the Dean Dome, against Duke.  In those days, the Cameron Crazies on one side of the gym used to throw tennis balls to their counterparts on the other. I got hit in the mouth, but like many teams (including some from Maryland), I didn't get a call. But I did see Len Bias put up 41 on the Blue Devils that season, on a night when Maryland's starting point guard, Keith Gatlin, sat out with back spasms.
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SPORTS
Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Editor's note: Towson junior running back Terrance West declared early for the NFL draft after setting school records with 4,584 career rushing yards and 86 touchdowns. The 5-foot-9, 223-pound Baltimore native is not enrolled at Towson this semester as he pursues the NFL and is sharing his draft experiences with Baltimore Sun reporter Aaron Wilson. This is the 11th in an occasional series leading up to the draft this week: I'm just preparing and controlling everything I can control.
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NEWS
August 6, 2000
The numbers game: People sometimes wonder what the number on a tennis ball means. It's there as sort of a name tag. If you're playing with a No. 3 ball and someone on the next court has No. 2's, when they get crossed up, as seems inevitable for most players, you can figure out whose ball is whose. Duty Calls: You'll see the terms "regular" and "extra" on cans of balls. Buy according to where you play. "Regular" balls are made to work best on clay and indoor surfaces. "Extra duty" balls hold up better on hard, abrasive outdoor surfaces.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
One of my favorite Cameron Indoor Stadium memories came on one of my first trips, back in 1986. I came for a game a couple of days before North Carolina was going to open the Dean Dome, against Duke.  In those days, the Cameron Crazies on one side of the gym used to throw tennis balls to their counterparts on the other. I got hit in the mouth, but like many teams (including some from Maryland), I didn't get a call. But I did see Len Bias put up 41 on the Blue Devils that season, on a night when Maryland's starting point guard, Keith Gatlin, sat out with back spasms.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
Sydnee is ready for some action. The 8-year-old seems anxious. She simply can't sit still. She tugs her "mom," Gail Robinson, this way and that way. She greets her buddies, scans the room then voices her opinion - loudly - about the fact that it's time to get things going. Sydnee, her mom will testify, enjoys living life to the max - to the extreme, one might say. Fact is, Sydnee, an Australian Shepherd, is the perfect dog for the hottest "extreme" dog sport: flyball. Although it's been around for a while, lately flyball has been growing (forgive us)
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1998
His lineage includes former big-league infielders Dick Schofield Jr. and Sr., his uncle and grandfather, and Dennis Werth, his stepfather, who played for the New York Yankees and Kansas City Royals.But Delmarva Shorebirds catcher Jayson Werth first learned baseball skills from his mother."When I was a little kid, she always had me outside hitting tennis balls, using a bat or something," said the 1997 first-round Orioles draftee. "Later, it was my stepfather who worked with me, got me on the right track."
TOPIC
By LOWELL COHN | August 29, 1999
THIS COLUMN is about a ball, the most wonderful ball ever invented. It's better than a baseball, basketball or football. It's better than any ball you can name. It was gone for 20 years, but it's making a comeback.It is called a Spaldeen, which might not mean anything to you, unless you grew up on the East Coast, preferably New York, before 1979. I grew up in Brooklyn in the 1950s and 1960s, which means my childhood memories are filled with Spaldeens.Starting in the 1920s, the Spalding Co. manufactured tennis balls at its home base in Chicopee, Mass.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
Isabella Jacoby is a zinfandel. Jordan Holton is a chardonnay. Will Brown is a tokay and Katie Brown a burgundy. (Other than that, she's no kin to Will.) Julia Barry is a chianti, Nora Feinstein a merlot and Alison Noji, a Champagne. These fourth- and fifth-graders at Mount Washington Elementary School might have settled on being grape jam, jelly, soda, Popsicles and shriveled little raisins if Eli M. Shulman, a retired dentist and gold-medal basement winemaker, hadn't come along. The team, assembled for this year's Destination Imagination, a national, creative problem-solving program and competition, had been wrestling since October with this year's challenge: to create a working "fruit roller coaster," complete with a loop, corkscrew and jump.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
Jeanne Ruviella-Knorr passed out bright green tennis balls to the second-graders sitting in four rows on the floor of the William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary School music room and then turned on a CD of Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa. The pupils rolled the tennis balls to the sound of flutes; tapped the tops, pretending to play piccolos; mimicked a trombone slide; and bounced the tennis balls to the drumbeat. "Tennis balls are just one of the things that I use to engage the children in creative improvisational musical activities," Ruviella-Knorr said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 17, 1995
LONDON -- Wimbledon, the world's premier tennis tournament, is going soft this year.In a bid to slow the game, the fluffy yellow tennis balls that male players love bashing to warp speed are being deflated ever so slightly. A weekend hacker wouldn't notice the difference, but men who earn millions serving and volleying the game into tedium have taken notice.And a lot of them are pretty upset, judging by the first reactions after the new balls were introduced this week at the Stella Artois Championships.
EXPLORE
June 20, 2012
What time is it when an elephant sits on your fence? Time to get a new fence! When does an elephant have eight legs? When there are two elephants! And when does the Equestrian Center become overrun with joke-telling boys? When it's the week of the Harford County District Cub Scout Day Camp! These are only a sampling of the jokes visitors to the Harford County Equestrian Center and surrounding fields (better known to some as the site of the Harford County Farm Fair)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
Prom season opens early at McDonogh School, with the invitation taking on as much import as the first dance step. One senior wrote a song, strummed his guitar and serenaded his girlfriend with a lyrical invitation to the event, set for Tuesday at Rams Head Live downtown. "I strolled around the library singing to people," said senior Dennis Chen. "Then I just pulled up a chair and asked Emma. " That would be classmate Emma Warden, who accepted her singing beau's well-orchestrated "ask," the students' term for these traditional invitations.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
The ballroom glittered Wednesday night, and it had little do with the sparkling silver tennis balls in the table centerpieces at the Sheraton Inner Harbor. The sparkle came from the tennis royalty assembled for the evening to honor Pam Shriver and her charity event the Tennis Challenge, which was retired after 25 years. Billie Jean King, Martina Navratilova, Chris Evert, Elise Burgin and Ellicott City's Beatrice Capra - the newest area tennis star, who made a major impact at this fall's U.S. Open - were all here for the tribute to Shriver.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | November 18, 2007
DEAR CAL -- My son is a catcher who does everything well except for blocking balls off the plate in the dirt. He tends to reach for them instead of jumping in front of them. Do you have any suggestions on drills to help? Casey McCray, Pensacola, Fla. DEAR CASEY -- I would be careful with your terminology when it comes to blocking. While you don't want to be lazy and reach for the ball, because that increases the chances that it will just skip by, you also aren't really "jumping in front of" the ball, either.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
Jeanne Ruviella-Knorr passed out bright green tennis balls to the second-graders sitting in four rows on the floor of the William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary School music room and then turned on a CD of Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa. The pupils rolled the tennis balls to the sound of flutes; tapped the tops, pretending to play piccolos; mimicked a trombone slide; and bounced the tennis balls to the drumbeat. "Tennis balls are just one of the things that I use to engage the children in creative improvisational musical activities," Ruviella-Knorr said.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2006
Carolyn Conn loaded tennis balls into a plastic cup at the end of a homemade wooden catapult. Prettany Overman scrutinized a bicycle wheel that she transformed into a working Ferris wheel. Andrew Ellis and Tim Odell fit plastic guardrails on a small replica of a roller coaster. The diverse assortment of projects the Bel Air Middle School pupils are working on are part of an extracurricular activity designed to challenge their creativity and build problem-solving skills. The program is called Destination ImagiNation, and middle-schoolers across the county are taking part, preparing for a regional competition Saturday at Bel Air Middle.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The eyes of the world may have been on the Summer Olympics in Barcelona yesterday, but the 26 competitors at Gunpowder Falls State Park were thinking snow.They were the finest State Highway Administration snow-removal specialists who assembled to compete for top honors in the 4th annual Snow Roadeo competition.Even the more experienced drivers going through the course, which was laid out with orange traffic cones on a parking lot, admitted it was challenging."The course was tight, tighter than usual," said George Weidner of the Hagerstown shop, an 18-year snow-removal veteran.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | September 17, 1990
There were no wild horses to ride, no cows to lasso and no clowns to run out to distract a raging bull.The dirt was asphalt, the stalls were parking spaces and men and wearing T-shirts and baseball caps outnumbered cowboys wearing 10-gallon hats 200 to none. This wasn't your everyday rodeo.This was for trucks. Waste disposal trucks. And the rodeo -- staged Saturday -- was a competition for the drivers who had to maneuver their rigs through a confusing array of cones and guard rails and tennis balls.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
The U.S. Army's Provincial Reconstruction Team, based in Kandahar Province near the Pakistan border, has a steady supply of all manner of balls, kites and jump-ropes, thanks to the family and friends of Maj. Edwin Singer, a Manchester resident who is on deployment in Afghanistan. Once, when a group of Afghan youths hurled rocks at the team's convoy, the soldiers fired back tennis balls. A game of toss with the balls ensued. Singer, director of the Carroll County Health Department's environmental health division and an officer in the Army Reserve called to active duty last year, reported the tennis ball incident to a long list of e-mail correspondents.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 17, 2004
They meet cute, play tennis cute and certainly look cute. Trouble is, that's as involving as this movie gets. Wimbledon is an attempt to play out Bull Durham on grass, to do for tennis what that great 1988 film did for baseball: make it seem hip, dramatic and, most of all, sexy. But it has nowhere near the edge of the earlier film, which was as smart as it was erotic; sadly, Wimbledon is neither. Paul Bettany is Peter Colt, a 32-year-old has-been on the pro tennis scene about to play in what he resignedly decides will be his final tournament.
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