Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTennis Association
IN THE NEWS

Tennis Association

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
November 29, 1991
NAME: Pam ShriverCLAIM TO FAME: President of the Women's Tennis Association.WORK LIFE: Professional tennis player.HOME LIFE: Single.PASSIONS: Low-fat frozen yogurt, women's tennis, politics, public service.QUOTE: "Do as much as you can now, because you don't know how long it will last."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,Special to The Sun | March 21, 2007
Nancy Hambleton turns 79 in a few weeks. She wants to improve her tennis game. A 5-foot-4, right-handed player, Hambleton relies more on precision than power and plays about four times a week, mostly in doubles matches. "They say it's the sport of a lifetime," Hambleton said. "I like the exercise, and it keeps you trim. It's good socially, and I've met a lot of people through tennis." She could be the model athlete for Welcome Back to Tennis, an initiative by the United State Tennis Association Senior Tennis Leagues in Anne Arundel County and the International Council on Active Aging.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 7, 1990
The following are the rules regarding locker-room access for male and female reporters for various sporting events:Major League Baseball: Clubhouses generally are open to male and female reporters, except for closing about 90 minutes before games. They reopen immediately after the game. The Baltimore Orioles allow reporters in their clubhouse until about 45 minutes before the first pitch.National Football League: Open to male and female reporters after games and for a short time on practice days.
SPORTS
By MIKE FRAINIE and MIKE FRAINIE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2006
COLLEGE PARK -- To say Wilde Lake's David Nguyen had a tough draw in the Maryland state high school tennis championships would be an understatement. All he had to do was beat a player ranked No. 3 in the nation among 16-year-olds by the U.S. Tennis Association -- and a two-time state champion -- in the semifinals and another ranked No. 1 in the Mid-Atlantic section in the same age group in the championship. Mission accomplished. Nguyen, a sophomore, used a powerful serve and an attacking strategy to beat Winston Churchill junior Jared Pinsky in the semifinals, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. The win over Pinsky was Nguyen's first over him in 10 tries.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
George DeWitt Fowler Jr., a retired National Security Agency manager and bowling and tennis enthusiast, died of complications from a neurological condition Saturday at Genesis ElderCare in Severna Park. The Glen Burnie resident was 81. Born in Bluefield, W.Va., and raised in Glendale, Calif., he joined the Army Air Forces during World War II and was a navigator on 11 combat missions in Europe. He received the Europe-Africa-Middle East Medal with three battle stars and the Air Force Longevity Ribbon with four Oak Leaf Clusters.
NEWS
December 25, 2002
Charles Martin Hughes, who taught math for 23 years at Essex Community College and was co-chairman of the Maryland State Tennis Tournament, died Monday of complications from colon cancer at Beverly Healthcare in Doylestown, Pa. He was 81. Mr. Hughes published books on mathematics and on his experience in World War II, but his passion was tennis, his family said. He played until a year before his death, often beating players decades younger. "He had a tremendous sense of humor, and as he was getting older, he would use that to his advantage on the tennis court," said daughter Molly Hughes of Charleston, S.C. "He would hobble out onto the court, and then beat players in their 20s and 30s."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,STAFF WRITER | August 29, 1993
The year was 1985. Pam Shriver, having overcome injuries that threatened her career, was back to No.3 in the world. Elise Burgin, having graduated Stanford the previous year, was up to No.22. And Andrea Leand, who had been ranked as high as 13th in 1982, was going off to Princeton.If Baltimore wasn't the center of women's tennis, it was certainly close. But the three players who helped put a city known for its crab cakes and baseball team on the world tennis map believe it won't likely happen again.
NEWS
By LOWELL SUNDERLAND | September 10, 2000
PLAY STARTED Thursday in the first John Graves Memorial Tennis Championship at Columbia's Wilde Lake Tennis Club. Early play in this club championship winds up today with final and championship matches running Thursday through next Sunday. This Columbia-wide championship was named for Graves, who died June 13,1999, playing the sport he loved. The retired Social Security Administration executive, also known in golf and duplicate bridge circles locally, began making his name in county tennis around 1980.
SPORTS
June 6, 2003
BOYS PLAYER OF THE YEAR Mark Gober McDonogh When the season began, Gober was not one of the favorites to win the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference title. As the season went on, however, he just kept getting better and better. He defeated defending champion Brian Crooke midway through the season, then beat him again in the MIAA championship final, 6-2, 6-3. Competing in the area's best tennis league, he posted a 12-2 record as the No. 1 singles player for the Eagles.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 3, 2004
THE PROPOSAL that a sizable tennis complex be built in the still-being-planned Troy Park in Elkridge guarantees some different, interesting discussion in coming months. We're talking about the pitch the Howard County Tennis Association, in conjunction with the U.S. Tennis Association's Maryland Division, made to the county recreation and parks advisory board Sept. 22. The concept is for about 16 of 106 acres of undeveloped parkland the county owns in the northeast corner of Interstate 95 and Route 100 to become a tennis mecca within the next five or so years.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
George DeWitt Fowler Jr., a retired National Security Agency manager and bowling and tennis enthusiast, died of complications from a neurological condition Saturday at Genesis ElderCare in Severna Park. The Glen Burnie resident was 81. Born in Bluefield, W.Va., and raised in Glendale, Calif., he joined the Army Air Forces during World War II and was a navigator on 11 combat missions in Europe. He received the Europe-Africa-Middle East Medal with three battle stars and the Air Force Longevity Ribbon with four Oak Leaf Clusters.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2005
A SMALL group of tennis dreamers lobbying for a complex to be built in a future Howard County park in Elkridge has taken its first baby steps toward making that happen. The nonprofit group, formed legally under the name of Howard County Tennis Patrons, is an amalgam of leaders of the Howard County Tennis Association and supporters from the U.S. Tennis Association's Maryland unit. The patrons have named a director - Hugh J. Cole Jr., an architect who lives in Owings Mills in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
To get and stay fit, all but the most sedentary know that you simply must huff and puff. Maybe you do that by jogging, or walking, or swimming or cycling. Too boring? Then maybe you are among the legions who have signed up for some kind of aerobics "class" - moving and sweating to jazz, to oldies, to the disco beat, or more contemporarily, to belly-dancing music or a bump-and-grind beat. If you are a tennis player at one of the Columbia Park and Recreation Association facilities, the newest, hottest thing to make you sweat is tennis aerobics.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 31, 2004
LIFE JUST wouldn't be as interesting without ifs, ands or buts. Take that recent proposal by the Howard County Tennis Association for building a regional facility - with indoor and outdoor courts, including a stadium court - on county-owned acreage that someday will become Troy Park in Elkridge. Since we reported about it last month, ifs, ands or buts have escalated, each contributing to a lot of buzz among people who like to play tennis in Howard County. Some samples of what is being talked about: If ... the county's Department of Recreation and Parks is to add the proposal to its construction plans for, say, four or five years from now, HCTA needs to come back relatively quickly with some facts and figures, not just a dream.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 3, 2004
THE PROPOSAL that a sizable tennis complex be built in the still-being-planned Troy Park in Elkridge guarantees some different, interesting discussion in coming months. We're talking about the pitch the Howard County Tennis Association, in conjunction with the U.S. Tennis Association's Maryland Division, made to the county recreation and parks advisory board Sept. 22. The concept is for about 16 of 106 acres of undeveloped parkland the county owns in the northeast corner of Interstate 95 and Route 100 to become a tennis mecca within the next five or so years.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | November 16, 2003
ADD TENNIS to the list of county sports in which a primary youth organization is beginning to talk about developing new facilities on its own - or maybe with a little involvement by public entities. The Howard County Tennis Association is a volunteer group that conducts lessons and a couple of tournaments each year for, mainly, children in public schools and in parts of the county without private tennis clubs. Now the group has begun openly talking about a facility it can call its own. The Soccer Association of Columbia/Howard County is building its own field complex, scheduled to open next spring.
SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2003
CHICAGO - She was a professional golfer, a saxophone player, a blues singer, a teacher, an orator, an actress - and one of the greatest champions in the history of tennis. But the significance of Althea Gibson's life, which ended yesterday at 76, probably is appreciated by far too few. No less a trailblazer than Jackie Robinson and Arthur Ashe, she had accomplishments perhaps more impressive because of her singular place as an African-American female athlete in the 1950s. Gibson was the first African-American to compete in the U.S. championship in 1950 and at Wimbledon in 1951.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2005
A SMALL group of tennis dreamers lobbying for a complex to be built in a future Howard County park in Elkridge has taken its first baby steps toward making that happen. The nonprofit group, formed legally under the name of Howard County Tennis Patrons, is an amalgam of leaders of the Howard County Tennis Association and supporters from the U.S. Tennis Association's Maryland unit. The patrons have named a director - Hugh J. Cole Jr., an architect who lives in Owings Mills in Baltimore County.
SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2003
CHICAGO - She was a professional golfer, a saxophone player, a blues singer, a teacher, an orator, an actress - and one of the greatest champions in the history of tennis. But the significance of Althea Gibson's life, which ended yesterday at 76, probably is appreciated by far too few. No less a trailblazer than Jackie Robinson and Arthur Ashe, she had accomplishments perhaps more impressive because of her singular place as an African-American female athlete in the 1950s. Gibson was the first African-American to compete in the U.S. championship in 1950 and at Wimbledon in 1951.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | July 13, 2003
TEEN-AGE players will abound at Wilde Lake Tennis Club this week during the 23rd Columbia Junior Open tennis tournament. But if you stop by, not all will be what it might appear. Which is not to knock this annual tournament a whit, because that's how tennis has to be played. Still, although it has borne the new town's name for more than two decades, the Columbia Junior Open isn't really about Columbia. Not anymore, that is. Of 121 players registered to compete in four age groups for boys and girls, only six list Columbia as home.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.