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By Steven Lubet | January 6, 1998
JUDGE ROY Moore, of Etowah County, Ala., received the Christian Statesman of the Year award not long ago at a Washington ceremony attended by 21 members of Congress.The provincial jurist was honored for his steadfast determination to keep a hand-carved plaque of the Ten Commandments hanging on his courtroom wall, though ordered by another court to remove the display.This phenomenon is hardly limited to Alabama. Although a Los Angeles businessman was refused permission to post the Ten Commandments along the fence of the Downey High School baseball field, Decalogue plaques have lately been mounted in public buildings in North Carolina, South Carolina and Texas, with others promised or promoted in Michigan, Wisconsin and elsewhere.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 27, 2014
The Constitution is powerless against Satan. Earlier this month, the state of Oklahoma received a proposal from New York-based Satanists to build near the state Capitol a 7-foot-high statue of Baphomet, a goat-headed pagan idol. The Satanists' letter boasted that, "The statue will also have a functional purpose as a chair where people of all ages may sit on the lap of Satan for inspiration and contemplation. " Now, while the Satanists are real, there's a lot of fakery involved.
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NEWS
By Linda Chavez | June 24, 1999
THE CULTURAL elite could hardly contain its derision last week when the House passed an amendment to permit the posting of the Ten Commandments in public schools. The amendment, attached to a juvenile justice bill, was sponsored by freshman Rep. Tom Tancredo, a Colorado Republican, whose district includes Littleton's Columbine High School.The Washington Post snidely editorialized: "The House did not entertain measures to make parents pay more attention to their children, or to expand mental health coverage, or to encourage jocks to treat Goths with more respect, but it discussed just about every other Columbine explanation."
NEWS
November 11, 2013
The U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Town of Greece, New York v. Susan Galloway is to consider whether Christian prayers at town board meetings are constitutional ("Justices to hear prayer case," Nov. 4). The U.S. Court of Appeals based in New York held that such prayers violate the Constitution because they represent "an endorsement of a particular religious viewpoint. " The First Amendment provides that, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof[.]"
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
The Alabama judge who has become a hero to the nation's religious conservatives for his refusal to remove the Ten Commandments from his courtroom told a Catonsville prayer breakfast yesterday there should be less separation between God and government."
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 2000
GADSDEN, Ala. - When Judge Roy S. Moore presides over cases in his Alabama courtroom, an American flag and the state seal hang on the wall over his left shoulder. A hand-carved plaque of the Ten Commandments hangs over his right shoulder. And the latter has made all the difference in his run for chief justice of the state's Supreme Court. Moore's claim of a constitutional right to display those wooden tablets in a public building - a right he has championed from California to Florida since 1995 - is the reason he's the leading Republican candidate for the judicial post in the primary today.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | June 11, 2000
HOUSTON - A Harris County man would like a federal judge to write an addendum to the Ten Commandments: Thou shalt not display religious Scripture in a courtroom. James Craig Guetersloh filed a motion Thursday for preliminary and permanent injunctions barring state District Judge John Devine from displaying the sacred text in his courtroom. Guetersloh said he noticed the biblical laws hanging inside the witness box during a trip to review the pleadings in a lawsuit filed against him. Devine is the presiding judge in the suit, in which a Harris County homeowners association alleges Guetersloh violated guidelines of the subdivision's architectural control committee.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 2003
MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Chief Justice Roy Moore was overruled by his eight associates on the Alabama Supreme Court yesterday when they ordered the removal of "Roy's Rock" from the lobby of their building. Writing that they are "bound by solemn oath to follow the law, whether they agree or disagree with it," the justices said in a signed statement that the state Supreme Court must abide by a federal court order mandating the removal of the 5,280-pound monument of the Ten Commandments that Moore had installed one night in 2001.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1997
At sundown tonight, Jews begin to celebrate Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new year and a time for personal introspection that focuses in part on the series of 10 statements that are a cornerstone of monotheism: The Ten Commandments.The commandments -- more accurately translated from Hebrew as the "10 Words" -- govern the relationship between God and humanity: I am the Lord your God who brought you out of slavery in Egypt. Have no false gods. Do not use God's name in vain. Keep the Sabbath holy.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- "Roy's Rock" may be gone, but its weight is still being felt. The 5,300-pound granite Ten Commandments monument that ignited a nationwide dispute last year is gone from the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court, locked away in a closet and replaced by a display as innocuous as a sixth-grade diorama. The man behind the monument, ousted Chief Justice Roy Moore, is still trying to get his job back. But the rock's defenders may be exacting revenge. In last week's state Republican primary, a former top aide of Moore's, a lawyer without any judicial experience, knocked off a sitting justice who had voted to remove the marker.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
Television commentator Ben Stern recently asked why we as a country have begun worshiping celebrities and stopped worshiping God. How many more Newtowns and Columbines must occur before we take Mr. Stern's remarks seriously? Kids now spend many more hours playing violent video games than going to church. This is wrong. As a society we need teach things like the sanctity of life at all levels. Mr. Stern went on to point out that the removal of God from schools has been a gradual erosion.
NEWS
March 21, 2010
A six-session class for those interested in learning the basics of the Christian faith begins today at Galilee Lutheran Church, 4652 Mountain Road, Pasadena. Topics in the 60-minute sessions will cover the Ten Commandments, the Apostles' Creed, Lord's Prayer, baptism, Communion, faith, the Bible and the church. Classes are open to the public, and all materials will be furnished. Child care is available. Information: 410-255-8236.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2006
While browsing the Internet in early December, Bob Bichell came across a Web site that caught his eye and touched his spirit. Bichell, a member of the Knights of Columbus, Dundalk Council No. 2942, contacted officials from Project Moses. That nonprofit organization is, its organizers say, committed to "re-establishing respect and appreciation" for the Ten Commandments. The Knights of Columbus council bought a Ten Commandments monument from the organization and installed it on the front lawn of Sacred Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Excuse me, folks, but what part of "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof" don't y'all understand? That question repeatedly came to mind as I waded into the 10 - 10! - opinions that make up the U.S. Supreme Court's twin hair-splitting decisions on public displays of the Ten Commandments. My three-word summary: "Thou shalt. Not!" The high court voted 5-4 to allow the Ten Commandments to be displayed on the Texas Capitol grounds but, by another 5-4 vote, not in two Kentucky county courthouses.
NEWS
By Joshua O. Haberman | March 6, 2005
THE DISPLAY of the Ten Commandments, engraved on stone slabs, in front of courthouses and other public property - including in Cumberland and Frederick - has sparked angry debates in Maryland and nationwide, forcing the issue to be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. Opening statements were made before the court last week in cases involving displays of the Ten Commandments on government property in Kentucky and Texas. Alabama's chief justice, Roy Moore, was dismissed from the bench in November 2003 because he would not remove a 5,300-pound granite monument of the Ten Commandments from the rotunda of the state courthouse.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Seated, as always, below an ornate marble frieze depicting Moses holding a Ten Commandments tablet, the Supreme Court wrestled yesterday with the emotional and increasingly political issue of when - and how - displays of the biblical laws should be permitted on government property. Hearing arguments in two cases involving Ten Commandment postings on the state Capitol grounds in Texas and in county courthouses in Kentucky, the justices struggled with the divisive question of whether those displays and hundreds like them across the country amount to harmless historical items or an unconstitutional endorsement of religion.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 1997
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- In Judge Roy Moore's courtroom, two wooden plaques inscribed with the Ten Commandments hang on the wall behind him. That's where they'll stay, Moore vows -- despite a state judge's ruling that the display is unconstitutional and the Ten Commandments must come down.The controversy has moved beyond Moore's Etowah County courtroom and the two wooden plaques he carved himself.Some religious conservatives and their leaders have rallied to Moore's cause. Here, they say, is the government trying to prevent a man from acknowledging his God -- another in a 35-year-long string of judicial affronts to religion.
NEWS
March 21, 2010
A six-session class for those interested in learning the basics of the Christian faith begins today at Galilee Lutheran Church, 4652 Mountain Road, Pasadena. Topics in the 60-minute sessions will cover the Ten Commandments, the Apostles' Creed, Lord's Prayer, baptism, Communion, faith, the Bible and the church. Classes are open to the public, and all materials will be furnished. Child care is available. Information: 410-255-8236.
TOPIC
October 17, 2004
The World Insurgents struck deep inside Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone, setting off bombs at a market and a popular cafe that killed at least 10 people - including four Americans - and wounded 20 others in the compound housing foreign embassies and Iraqi government offices. Members of Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army began turning over weapons to Iraqi authorities in Baghdad as the first step in a fledgling peace agreement designed to end weeks of deadly clashes in the capital.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- "Roy's Rock" may be gone, but its weight is still being felt. The 5,300-pound granite Ten Commandments monument that ignited a nationwide dispute last year is gone from the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court, locked away in a closet and replaced by a display as innocuous as a sixth-grade diorama. The man behind the monument, ousted Chief Justice Roy Moore, is still trying to get his job back. But the rock's defenders may be exacting revenge. In last week's state Republican primary, a former top aide of Moore's, a lawyer without any judicial experience, knocked off a sitting justice who had voted to remove the marker.
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