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By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 28, 1993
Today's lesson: Modern-style crispy tempura frying.* Why tempura fried food tastes so good: The thin, almost translucent batter transfers heat from the oil immediately into the food. The juices from the food turn to steam and do the real cooking. The steam keeps the fats from entering the food. The result is light and delicate fried food.* Advantages: The crispy thin batter contains a small portion of the fat found in traditional heavy frying. The thin batter also allows the flavor of the vegetable, fish, shellfish or poultry as well as the spices and seasonings to shine through.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | January 24, 2013
Sheldon is thrilled with his back-to-back wins and that he is "one step closer for a better future for myself and a brighter future for my family. " Josie, on the other hand, is wiping away tears as she justifies her throwing-Kristen-under-the-bus actions to a silent Lizzie. "I don't care what anyone thinks," she stammers. If you don't care what anyone thinks, then why are you crying?  Heading into the kitchen, Padma introduces Master Sushi Chef Katsuya Uechi. The challenge is to impress him with a sushi dish -- he urges the cheftestants to keep it simple.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 29, 2003
Q: Whenever I make tempura, it comes out much greasier than at Japanese restaurants. Am I using the wrong oil or a bad recipe? Thanks for helping. A: There is nothing worse than biting into a beautiful golden brown piece of tempura and having what seems like a cup of warm oil dribble into your mouth. There is no oil on this planet that would make that a good experience - but it's not the type of oil that causes the problem. Most oils are fine to use for tempura; I personally like canola because it doesn't impart any flavor to the food fried in it. The key to grease-free tempura lies in the temperature of the oil, which should be between 340 degrees and 360 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Canton Square is known for a lot of things: fun nights out, high-energy bars, easy access to Miller Lite. What's not on that list? Calming surroundings and top-notch Asian food. Shiso Tavern, which opened in June in the space formerly occupied by Cosmopolitan and, most recently, by Te Amo, just might change that. Owners Mel Carter and Brett Lockard understand what it takes to create a Canton-area hot spot: They're also the team behind Blue Hill Tavern and Tavern on the Square.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 25, 1998
Don't let the name fool you. Edo Sushi, the new Japanese restaurant in Timonium, offers much more than raw fish on seasoned rice. Traditional casseroles, teriyaki, tempura and noodle dishes are all on the menu. About the only thing you can't get here is a Japanese beer; Edo Sushi doesn't have a liquor license. (The restaurant is happy for you to bring your own alcohol.)This is a sunny, cheerful little dining room with lots of blond wood -- shiny and bright as a new penny. Kimono-clad waitresses carrying the sushi chef's pretty creations glide from table to table.
TRAVEL
August 10, 2008
The best value restaurants from Food & Wine magazine's 2008 lists (in alphabetical order): 1. Kau Kee Restaurant, Hong Kong 2. Kefi, New York City 3. Kiosko Universal, Barcelona, Spain 4. Legendary Noodle, Vancouver, Canada 5. Les Cocottes, Paris 6. Love Supreme, Sydney, Australia 7. Open Colonna, Rome 8. Refuel, London 9. Taberna Laredo, Madrid, Spain 10. Tempura Mikawa, Tokyo
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
The Geisha Roll ($11.95) at Chiyo Sushi in Mount Washington got me. I was taken by its avocado bottom, enthralled by its chopped salmon salad middle, swept away by its lotus root top. The Dragon Roll ($9.95) also turned my head. This sleek combination of crab and cucumber on the inside and eel and tobiko (fish roe) on the outside was fresh and appealing. The Orioles Roll ($11.95), a mixture of white tuna, tempura flakes and sweet hot sauce wrapped with salmon, avocado and tobiko, had its moments in part because the Orioles had won the day I visited the restaurant.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1998
Tokyo Sushi, a tiny restaurant tucked into the quiet part of a Glen Burnie strip shopping center, serves up tasty sushi at even tastier prices.The food is excellent -- the tempura is the best I've had in northern Anne Arundel County -- the service is great, and the lunch prices are unbelievably inexpensive.A famished friend and I arrived at 1 p.m. on a weekday and found the restaurant empty except for its owner and his family sitting in the back, chatting over lunch.The restaurant, which opened Nov. 3, has been building up a clientele, but its location doesn't make that easy.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | January 17, 1991
The Orient is a bit misleading. From its name, one might think this downtown Towson restaurant offers cuisine from across a continent.It does not.It offers a great number of Chinese dishes and a sampling of Japanese fare. There is an attractive sushi bar separate from the dining room.Except for a mixed appetizer tempura plate, my husband and I stuck to Chinese dishes on a recent visit to The Orient. And except for that tempura, what we had was mostly run-of-the-mill. At higher than run-of-the-mill prices.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
When Chong Im and Chong Won So moved to Glen Burnie 15 years ago, the Korean-American community there was virtually nonexistent, so they opened Peking Garden restaurant at 7523 Ritchie Highway and served Chinese food.But as more Korean-Americans settled in Glen Burnie, the couple slowly began adding Korean dishes to the menu. About six months ago, the metamorphosis was complete.The Sos added a sushi bar and new tables with built-in hot plates for Korean-style barbecue, introduced a new menu with Korean, Japanese and Chinese fare, and changed the restaurant's name to Blue Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
The Red Parrot Asian Bistro in Hanover - the community in Anne Arundel County, not Pennsylvania - has good food in a bland setting. It is a restaurant that specializes in Southeast Asian fare. The setting, a glassy corner building in a mall just off the Baltimore- Washington Parkway, is less than uplifting. The service, young men and women clad in black, is spotty. The fare, however, has taste and substance. Red Parrot is one of the tenants of a shopping center that has sprung up on Dorchester Boulevard and Arundel Mills Boulevard, not far from the mother of all malls, Arundel Mills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Kyodai bills itself as Baltimore's only rotating sushi bar. The concept is simple, if at first unintentionally amusing: You sit at the bar with your napkin, chopsticks, soy, wasabi and ginger. The sushi-tenders roll up various concoctions, cut them, usually into quarters, plate them, and place them on a shiny silver conveyor belt that chugs along the inside perimeter of the bar. And as they pass, you reach up and pluck down plates that look right for you. No menu. No wondering what it might look like.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
The Geisha Roll ($11.95) at Chiyo Sushi in Mount Washington got me. I was taken by its avocado bottom, enthralled by its chopped salmon salad middle, swept away by its lotus root top. The Dragon Roll ($9.95) also turned my head. This sleek combination of crab and cucumber on the inside and eel and tobiko (fish roe) on the outside was fresh and appealing. The Orioles Roll ($11.95), a mixture of white tuna, tempura flakes and sweet hot sauce wrapped with salmon, avocado and tobiko, had its moments in part because the Orioles had won the day I visited the restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2009
In an article in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience, the way you choose a sushi bar - whether to stay with your old standby or to keep looking - is used as a "classic problem" of the "exploration/exploitation dilemma." It's nice to know your problems are classic. Joss Cafe & Sushi Bar, which opened a few months ago downtown, is my kind of sushi restaurant. The only thing it doesn't have is a bar for happy hour, for a night in the future when I might want to sneak in by myself for a quick bite after work.
TRAVEL
August 10, 2008
The best value restaurants from Food & Wine magazine's 2008 lists (in alphabetical order): 1. Kau Kee Restaurant, Hong Kong 2. Kefi, New York City 3. Kiosko Universal, Barcelona, Spain 4. Legendary Noodle, Vancouver, Canada 5. Les Cocottes, Paris 6. Love Supreme, Sydney, Australia 7. Open Colonna, Rome 8. Refuel, London 9. Taberna Laredo, Madrid, Spain 10. Tempura Mikawa, Tokyo
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2006
Imagine the perfect little neighborhood sushi restaurant, and a place much like Kiku Sushi is sure to spring to mind. The perfect restaurant starts, of course, with the perfect location, and bustling Light Street in Federal Hill certainly qualifies. You wouldn't want your fantasy restaurant in a strip mall. You wouldn't want it to be part of a chain, either, and Kiku isn't. The single location is owned by Tori Yang and run by his family. Your fantasy restaurant would be small, but a clever layout would make it seem spacious.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2003
Upstairs in the dining room at Hana Japanese Restaurant in East Baltimore is a small flower bed. Unlike 95 percent of carryout restaurants I've ventured into, this one actually contains living plants. It's only appropriate, I suppose, for a restaurant named after the Japanese word for flower. But the live flowers confirmed my initial impression walking in that Hana is a restaurant that really cares. Hana opened about 10 months ago and is not related to Sushi Hana in Towson. This one sits between two beauty-supply shops on a busy block of East Monument Street abutting the Johns Hopkins medical complex.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 11, 2006
As 2006 kicks off, a couple of Baltimore hangouts are hoping to combine the old with the new. In the basement of the Belvedere Hotel, Kamikazis has just opened where Kobe Teppan closed last November. It, too, is a sushi/hibachi Japanese restaurant. And it, too, is hoping to hook B-more's late-night crowd. But Kamikazis manager Hillary Herlehy says she and owner James C. Foster hope to ratchet things up a notch. To start with, Herlehy says they've tried to give the place a slightly more "energetic feel."
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