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Temporary Signs

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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Westminster merchants who want to put sandwich board signs outside their shops will have to forgo neon, flashing lights, fluttering flags or obscene or indecent words or pictures.The City Council gave consensus approval at last night's meeting to those and other proposed regulations for temporary advertising signs. But the council postponed a formal vote so the city staff could revise the proposed rules to respond to council concerns and suggestions.City law will treat the sandwich board signs as temporary advertising displays, a separate category from permanent business signs.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
Cordish Co.'s new 600-space Inner Harbor parking garage may be the best-advertised spot in downtown Baltimore. Four large banners adorn it and the Cordish-run Power Plant complex a block away. Three street-level sandwich-board signs urge drivers to use the garage at 711 E. Pratt St. But according to city zoning and public works officials, those temporary signs are as illegal as they are visible - a claim disputed by the Cordish Co. The disagreement has placed customary allies - the city and one of Baltimore's most successful developers - on opposite sides.
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NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
County officials, fed up after years of trying to pass a new law restricting signs, have decided to begin enforcing part of the law already on the books.County Executive Robert R. Neall announced Fridayhe intends to enforce part of the law to reduce the clutter of temporary signs around the county."I can tell you, as I drive up and down the roads, that Anne Arundel County has gotten a little out of hand," Neall told members of the Anne Arundel County Association of Realtors."We've got to get things back under control.
NEWS
August 21, 2000
Work on intersection to be finished in late fall The State Highway Administration has begun improvements to the intersection of Route 97 (Malcolm Drive) and Route 140 in Westminster. Work is to include widening the road for another through lane about one-quarter mile along eastbound Route 97. The existing road will be surfaced, and striping, pavement markings, signs and landscaping will be added. Message signs, traffic barrels, temporary signs and panels will guide motorists through the intersection during construction.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 6, 1993
The Mount Airy Town Council has introduced an ordinance aimed at cracking down on the temporary signs popping up at shopping centers and along streets."
NEWS
September 19, 1997
IT'S DIFFICULT to feel bad for homebuilders who claim they're being hurt by tougher enforcement against those paper signs they stick up to direct people to new developments. They say the temporary signs are one of their most important marketing tools, but such signs are outlawed in some Baltimore suburbs and restricted in the others. The rules have been in place for a long time. It is the builders' own fault if they constructed a marketing strategy that's illegal.This is not to say the building industry's concerns can be blown off. It is a valuable part of local economies in which many plumbers, electricians, title agents and others make their living.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
A recent crackdown on illegal road signs -- the colorful advertisements for new homes, diet programs and restaurants -- has cleared nearly 20,000 cardboard placards from state and county roadways.But area homebuilders claim that the enforcement campaign -- especially Baltimore County's tough tactics -- has deepened a slump in house sales."My traffic has gone down drastically because of it," said President T. Kevin Carney of Thomas Builders, who is building houses in Owings Mills. "Forty percent of my traffic comes from signs."
NEWS
September 16, 1993
Mount Airy enacts law regulating temporary signsThe Mount Airy Town Council has unanimously adopted an ordinance regulating the use of temporary signs.Under the ordinance approved Monday, the town's zoning administrator will be able to remove signs on public property 48 hours after notice has been given to the sign's owner. Previously the zoning administrator couldn't remove signs.Generally, town officials have written or asked violators to remove signs. Sometimes they comply, sometimes they don't, officials said.
NEWS
August 21, 2000
Work on intersection to be finished in late fall The State Highway Administration has begun improvements to the intersection of Route 97 (Malcolm Drive) and Route 140 in Westminster. Work is to include widening the road for another through lane about one-quarter mile along eastbound Route 97. The existing road will be surfaced, and striping, pavement markings, signs and landscaping will be added. Message signs, traffic barrels, temporary signs and panels will guide motorists through the intersection during construction.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
Cordish Co.'s new 600-space Inner Harbor parking garage may be the best-advertised spot in downtown Baltimore. Four large banners adorn it and the Cordish-run Power Plant complex a block away. Three street-level sandwich-board signs urge drivers to use the garage at 711 E. Pratt St. But according to city zoning and public works officials, those temporary signs are as illegal as they are visible - a claim disputed by the Cordish Co. The disagreement has placed customary allies - the city and one of Baltimore's most successful developers - on opposite sides.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
Tied on fences, stapled to poles, propped atop pumps and plastered on walls, cigarette posters and banners grow like kudzu at many gas stations and convenience stores.The signs are evidently effective, because such shops account for the majority of cigarette sales in the United States, tobacco companies say. And with the Marlboro Man and his cigarette-selling sidekicks scheduled to be booted off billboards and taxis in April under the states' tobacco settlement, such signs will soon become the most visible remaining outdoor tobacco advertising.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1998
Carroll County residents looking to get rid of more than 300 billboards that line the county's highways did not get encouraging news last night.A proposed amendment to the county sign law would bar new billboards only.Few, if any, new billboards would be erected regardless because the county is essentially "built out" as far as outdoor advertising is concerned, zoning administrator George L. Beisser told a small group of concerned residents.Billboards, other than those that existed before Aug. 17, 1965, are allowed only in commercial and business zones.
NEWS
October 16, 1997
A Westminster man was sentenced to more than four years in prison after pleading guilty Tuesday to stealing money from customers at a carwash.Kane A. Magruder, 22, of the 100 block of Charles St. pocketed a $30 deposit from a customer March 21, $140 on March 22 and about $125 for waxing and cleaning a vehicle March 23, while he worked at Duke's Car Wash on Sullivan Avenue in Westminster, court records show.Magruder was sentenced to 18 months on the theft charge, concurrent with four years and 84 days remaining from a five-year suspended sentence he received on a robbery conviction in 1996.
NEWS
September 19, 1997
IT'S DIFFICULT to feel bad for homebuilders who claim they're being hurt by tougher enforcement against those paper signs they stick up to direct people to new developments. They say the temporary signs are one of their most important marketing tools, but such signs are outlawed in some Baltimore suburbs and restricted in the others. The rules have been in place for a long time. It is the builders' own fault if they constructed a marketing strategy that's illegal.This is not to say the building industry's concerns can be blown off. It is a valuable part of local economies in which many plumbers, electricians, title agents and others make their living.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
A recent crackdown on illegal road signs -- the colorful advertisements for new homes, diet programs and restaurants -- has cleared nearly 20,000 cardboard placards from state and county roadways.But area homebuilders claim that the enforcement campaign -- especially Baltimore County's tough tactics -- has deepened a slump in house sales."My traffic has gone down drastically because of it," said President T. Kevin Carney of Thomas Builders, who is building houses in Owings Mills. "Forty percent of my traffic comes from signs."
NEWS
May 1, 1997
UNTIL NOW, opposition from business was the reason that Baltimore County would not replace its outdated sign law, which has been virtually unchanged since Eisenhower was president.Happily, the county council has come up with revisions business apparently can live with. Unhappily, the bill has stalled. Much as council members agree they need an updated law, bickering over minor details has delayed its passage. The bill is sponsored by the council's two Republican members, Douglas B. Riley and T. Bryan McIntire.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
The Baltimore County Council has taken 30 years to revise its sign law -- but most council members say they need a few more days to make up their minds about a bill that would restrict the size, number and kinds of signs in the county.Among the possible changes to the bill, which is up for a vote Monday, are amendments ensuring that homeowners could continue to fly decorative banners and clarifying the restrictions on billboard locations."I'd like to see some changes," Council Chairman Joseph Bartenfelder, a Fullerton Democrat, said yesterday, adding that he wants to ease restrictions on temporary signs.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1998
Carroll County residents looking to get rid of more than 300 billboards that line the county's highways did not get encouraging news last night.A proposed amendment to the county sign law would bar new billboards only.Few, if any, new billboards would be erected regardless because the county is essentially "built out" as far as outdoor advertising is concerned, zoning administrator George L. Beisser told a small group of concerned residents.Billboards, other than those that existed before Aug. 17, 1965, are allowed only in commercial and business zones.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
The Baltimore County Council has taken 30 years to revise its sign law -- but most council members say they need a few more days to make up their minds about a bill that would restrict the size, number and kinds of signs in the county.Among the possible changes to the bill, which is up for a vote Monday, are amendments ensuring that homeowners could continue to fly decorative banners and clarifying the restrictions on billboard locations."I'd like to see some changes," Council Chairman Joseph Bartenfelder, a Fullerton Democrat, said yesterday, adding that he wants to ease restrictions on temporary signs.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1997
Prompted by community complaints, Baltimore County inspectors will soon begin yanking the small, temporary cardboard signs that litter intersections and advertise everything from new housing developments to karate lessons and diet powder."
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