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By Mike Giuliano | July 4, 1991
Theater director Sam McCready has never been one to play by the book in his productions at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, so imagine what he does when the book in question is Prospero's volume of necromancy in "The Tempest."Whatever you're imagining at this moment, though, probably falls short of what Mr. McCready has done for better -- and mostly for worse -- with his rock musical version, "The Tempest: A Rock Odyssey," in which the Elizabethan age meets the space age. There certainly are no lutes to be heard here, what with keyboard wails and thumping drumming to rival any tempest.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
After three successful seasons, the Annapolis Shakespeare Company is completing its final production as a resident theater company at Bowie Playhouse with a fine production of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," continuing weekends through Aug. 17. Annapolis Shakespeare was founded in 2009 by Sally Boyett as a workshop group and quickly rose to become an accomplished performance company at Bowie Playhouse. Nevertheless, when the troupe made its Bowie debut in 2011 with "Twelfth Night," one could hardly have anticipated it outgrowing this venue in just three years.
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Contributing Writer | July 23, 1992
An admirable version of Shakespeare's last play, "The Tempest," is the final summer presentation of The New Century Theater, a young professional theater in residence in the Mildred Dunnock Theatre at Goucher College.Running through Aug. 2, this fantastical story about the clash of aesthetic and evil forces manipulated by a great enchanter on a remote magical island has been commendably directed by Richard Pilcher. Good ensemble acting, some brilliantly conceived individual performances and excellent special effects mark this uniquely staged production.
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Letter to The Aegis | April 2, 2013
Editor: I am writing in response to an apparent dust-up over the use of rap lyrics on a t-shirt at Joppatowne High School. Unfortunately, I did not see the original letter to the editor on this subject, but I can comment on the mother-educator response. It disturbs me to read that a parent and educator would actually condone the use of this particular rap song, or any part of it in a school setting. This so called song contains foul language and atrocious grammar from start to finish as well as the use of the controversial "N" word; though in the so-called acceptable context we have been duped to believe is "artistic expression.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 22, 2004
For all of the wizard Prospero's sweeping, sky-colored robe, his magic wand and book of spells, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival production of The Tempest is fatally short on sorcery - especially the garden-variety sort that can keep an audience spellbound through five acts. Instead, audience members may feel as though they are visiting the Land of Tiny Emotions. Everything is remote, encapsulated, cut off. Instead of a gale of epic proportions, director Laura Hackman gives us a drizzle.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2005
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre usually slots the Bard for July, the central month of its calendar. This season brings Shakespeare's The Tempest - a comedy that offers dances and songs and some mystical characters that the audience can see but are invisible to other actors on stage. A great storm - the tempest of the title - forces Alonso, the King of Naples, and his traveling party to abandon their ship. With Alonso are his brother, Sebastian; his son, Ferdinand; and Antonio, brother of the rightful Duke of Milan, Prospero.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 12, 1998
Some network ideas are so screwy you wonder how they ever made it to the screen.NBC's "The Tempest" is one of them. It's billed by the network as "based on Shakespeare's classic story" and being "an inventive re-telling of the magical tale."There is a lot of invention, I'll give it that. Shakespeare's tale of an enchanted island and a magician named Prospero is transplanted to the American South during the Civil War. Shakespeare's Prospero is recast as a plantation owner, Gideon Prosper, played by Peter Fonda.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2005
Local Shakespeare devotees have cause to celebrate this month with Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's superb production of The Tempest. This comedic romance filled with mystical characters who manipulate the fates of courtiers and royals is one of William Shakespeare's last great plays, and some scholars contend it may be autobiographical, reflecting the Bard's later life. Director Barry Genderson has set The Tempest in the free-spirited 1920s and has changed most of the principal characters from male to female.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 12, 1992
New Century's 'Tempest' opens WednesdayN ew Century Theater continues its summer residency at Goucher College's Mildred Dunnock Theatre with "The Tempest," Shakespeare's late romance about shipwrecks, magic and reconciliation. Directed by Richard Pilcher, the production is produced and designed by Mark Redfield, who, appropriately enough, also portrays Prospero, the magician who instigates the action. In addition, this first Shakespearean effort by the young company will feature masks by Eric Supensky, original music by Anne Watts and movement choreography by Karen Bradley.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2003
The Servis brothers are making Laurel Park their personal playground this winter. John Servis has sent three horses into the track for stakes victories since New Year's Day, and yesterday Jason joined the winning trainer's act by saddling Tempest Fugit to a front-running score in the $100,000 John B. Campbell Handicap. Postponed from the previous Sunday by the snowstorm that hit the state last weekend, the Campbell originally had an 11-horse field. It went to the post with only eight after the last-minute scratch of Quick Punch yesterday.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 26, 2013
Yet again, Harford County's lack of pull in the circles of influence in Annapolis has proven not only embarrassing, but also detrimental to the county's citizenry. Last week, the Maryland Board of Public Works voted, 2-1, to delay appropriating money to allow construction to start on a Harford County campus of Towson University that's planned as a major addition to and partnership with Harford Community College. To be clear, this has all the trappings of a tempest in a teapot.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
Twenty years after the last time Maryland voters weighed in on a law passed by the General Assembly, they got the chance to do it three times in 2012, with referendums on in-state tuition for some illegal immigrants, same-sex marriage and a gerrymandered congressional district map designed to deliver one more seat to the Democrats. The powers that be in Annapolis are not thrilled - Gov. Martin O'Malley proclaimed it "a little too easy" to put a law on the ballot - and now several of them have introduced legislation to make the task harder.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Faith Loudon plans to eat at as many local Chick-fil-A restaurants as she can manage on Wednesday - at least six. Other Marylanders, meanwhile, are vowing to donate the amount it would have cost them to get a chicken meal from the fast-food chain to gay-rights groups. Nothing turns a sandwich into a symbol faster than a company executive wading into politics, especially on a subject as divisive as gay marriage. Chick-fil-A's president and CEO, Dan T. Cathy, told the Biblical Recorder, a Baptist journal, in early July that the company was "very much supportive of the family - the biblical definition of the family unit.
NEWS
February 10, 2011
If there is any lesson to be drawn from Baltimore City Democratic Del. Curt Anderson's quixotic foray into the House of Delegates Tea Party Caucus, it is this: Cynicism and the pursuit of political self-interest are alive and well in Annapolis. Veteran lawmakers like to talk about a time when Republicans and Democrats fought ferociously during the election season but then put partisan politics behind them when the time came to govern. If that was ever really true, it is certainly not now. Mr. Anderson has something of a point in his explanation for why he, a fairly liberal Democrat and head of the city's very liberal House delegation, would join a group that takes its name from the strongest force in contemporary conservative politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2008
The Tempest opens with a storm at sea. Everyone on the ship is seemingly lost, but later, one after another, they all turn up on the same island. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company shows what happens next in an enjoyable outdoor production running through July 13. The storm, the audience learns, was caused by a sorcerer named Prospero. Formerly Duke of Milan, Prospero was deposed years before by his evil brother Antonio, with the connivance of Alonso, king of Naples. With his infant daughter Miranda, he was sent to sea in a dilapidated ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | July 8, 2004
What: Studio tours, sculpture exhibitions and live theater Where: 4545 N. Charles St. When: 5 p.m. today Why: Because the mansion will extend its hours this evening so that visitors can tour the Sculpture at Evergreen exhibit and visit the studio of artist-in-residence, photographer Mehmet Dogu. If you're of a more sedentary persuasion, then just bring a picnic and simply relax on the grounds while the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival rehearses its production of The Tempest. The practice run is scheduled to begin around 7 p.m. and admission is free.
NEWS
By Nancy Noyes | August 16, 1992
Asked for the secret of his win last weekend in the 14-boat J/24 class at Severn Sailing Association's (SSA) Ed Hoyt Regatta, Annapolitan Bunky Hines said, "Have a baby, win a race."In fact, it was solid and consistent sailing in the two-day, five-race event that won Hines and his Bunky's Boat crew the regatta.But Hines regarded it as a fitting celebration of the birth of his daughter, Charlotte Christine, the night before the regatta began.He emerged at the top of the fleet at the end of Saturday's racing and held on through Sunday's contests to win the regatta.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | December 2, 2007
Teddy P. Brains doesn't wear baggy jeans that droop below his waistline. Nor does he sass his elders, make trouble for his teachers or speak in slang-laced broken English. However, the 6-year-old African-American animated cartoon character does talk of being a marine biologist when he grows up. He's the valedictorian of his elementary school, where his favorite subject is math, and he enjoys traveling to exotic lands. Your child could learn much from him. Or at least that's the hope of Philadelphia-area video producers Eugene Haynes and Joseph L. Lewis III, creators of the DVD The Adventures of Teddy P. Brains, which was released in April.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2005
Local Shakespeare devotees have cause to celebrate this month with Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's superb production of The Tempest. This comedic romance filled with mystical characters who manipulate the fates of courtiers and royals is one of William Shakespeare's last great plays, and some scholars contend it may be autobiographical, reflecting the Bard's later life. Director Barry Genderson has set The Tempest in the free-spirited 1920s and has changed most of the principal characters from male to female.
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