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Temperament

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NEWS
July 23, 2010
In recent weeks I've noticed a trend that I'm surprised no one has pointed out yet. Whenever former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. faces any kind of criticism or what might qualify as an "off-script" question, he seems to become genuinely enraged--disconnecting callers on his own radio show, lashing out a caller recently on WTOP, essentially yelling back at him that he would not hear this person out--because he didn't agree. I rarely see this kind of behavior from Gov. Martin O'Malley.
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NEWS
June 8, 2014
It is a rare pleasure in any election year (and perhaps this one more than most) to have a candidate for state-wide office we can endorse so enthusiastically as we do Brian Frosh in the Democratic primary for attorney general. In his career in the General Assembly, he has distinguished himself as a considerate and effective legislator, and we have no doubt that he would excel as Maryland's top lawyer. Mr. Frosh has represented Montgomery County in the state Senate since 1995 and was in the House of Delegates for two terms before that.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 5, 1995
With his long chestnut hair falling over his wire-rimmed glasses, former Marylander John Glover yelled a joyous "Thank you!" after receiving the best featured actor Tony Award last night for his performance in "Love! Valour! Compassion!"It was the first Tony nomination for Glover, who was raised in Salisbury and was the first theater major to graduate from what was then called Towson State Teachers College.Calling from Sardi's Restaurant only moments after his triumph, an exuberant Glover exclaimed: "I'm telling you I can't describe what that feeling is like when they said my name, but, boy, I hope everybody in their lifetime could have it once, it's such a rush."
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 2, 2012
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburglikes the Indian Healthcare Improvement Act and other ingredients of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka "Obamacare. " Why, she asked toward the end of three days of hearings, shouldn't the court keep the good stuff in Obamacare and just dump the unconstitutional bits? The court, she explained, is presented with "a choice between a wrecking operation ... or a salvage job. And the more conservative approach would be salvage rather than throwing out everything.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | January 28, 2001
You know you live in Columbia when someone complains of "leggy" flowers. You'd have heard it at last Wednesday evening's Columbia Council hearings on a proposed budget of $51.7 million for the fiscal year beginning in May. The citizen's concern leads to a bit of conjuring on the relationship between politics and plants. Persons with disproportionately long legs are or may be called leggy. Horticulturally, the word refers to a condition occurring when too little light reaches the right plant surfaces.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 2, 2012
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburglikes the Indian Healthcare Improvement Act and other ingredients of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka "Obamacare. " Why, she asked toward the end of three days of hearings, shouldn't the court keep the good stuff in Obamacare and just dump the unconstitutional bits? The court, she explained, is presented with "a choice between a wrecking operation ... or a salvage job. And the more conservative approach would be salvage rather than throwing out everything.
NEWS
By STEVEN LUBET AND DAVID MCGOWAN | November 28, 2005
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. did not play fast and loose with judicial ethics rules in a 2002 appeal involving the Vanguard mutual fund company, as some recent reports suggest. Eight Senate Democrats have initiated an inquiry into the case, requesting information about Judge Alito's initial decision not to recuse himself even though he held a six-figure investment in Vanguard funds at the time. They will discover that Judge Alito's conduct in the matter, though not perfect, actually provides a good example of how judges should ultimately handle financial conflicts of interest.
NEWS
November 4, 1992
More than eight months ago, we quoted Gov. Bill Clinton as saying of his second-place finish in the year's first presidential primary, "New Hampshire tonight has made Bill Clinton the comeback kid." He was referring to the fact that after explosive revelations about his womanizing and his draft avoidance had knocked him out of first place in the public opinion polls, he gained back about half his loss to finish behind Paul Tsongas.We took the conventional view that former Senator Tsongas was the real comeback kid. He doubled his support to win the New Hampshire primary.
NEWS
October 24, 2003
On Tuesday, October 21, 2003, ELIZABETH J. "BETTY", wife of the late Nicholas P. Tempera; beloved mother of Lori L. Ingram; devoted daughter of John L. and E. Marian Patterson; sister of Barbara Williams and the late Janet Jubb; and grandmother of Jay C. and Shawn C. Ingram. Friends may call on Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Stallings Funeral Home, P.A., 3111 Mountain Road, Pasadena, where funeral services will be held on Saturday at 4 p.m. Interment private. Memorial contributions may be made to Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Oncology Dept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Staff | December 9, 2001
Temperament: The Idea That Solved Music's Greatest Riddle, by Stuart M. Isacoff. 288 pages. Alfred A. Knopf. $23. Given the spate of unexpectedly popular books on scientific and mathematical subjects in recent years, it's not surprising that someone should attempt to turn a rather arcane musical matter into an entertaining slice of history. Usually, only musicians and piano technicians get intensely interested in discussing the complex issue of tuning, and even they may not take the conversation all the way back to Sir Isaac Newton or Galileo, not to mention Pythagoras.
NEWS
July 23, 2010
In recent weeks I've noticed a trend that I'm surprised no one has pointed out yet. Whenever former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. faces any kind of criticism or what might qualify as an "off-script" question, he seems to become genuinely enraged--disconnecting callers on his own radio show, lashing out a caller recently on WTOP, essentially yelling back at him that he would not hear this person out--because he didn't agree. I rarely see this kind of behavior from Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
January 12, 2010
I t's been less than a week since Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake learned that she would become mayor next month, and it was clear in an hourlong meeting with The Sun's editorial board Monday that she does not yet have all the answers for solving the major challenges the city faces. To her credit, she doesn't pretend to, either. She gave definitive answers where she could - for example, that she plans to retain Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III - and otherwise conveyed a solid approach to setting priorities and making public policy.
NEWS
October 26, 2008
Today, America finds itself beset by challenges on all sides. At home, a faltering economy teeters on the edge of financial collapse. Abroad, some 175,000 U.S. troops are fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet victory in the war on terror remains elusive. Russia and China vie for world leadership, while rogue states North Korea and Iran destabilize their regions with the threat of nuclear proliferation. But Americans, many of whom have felt profoundly the heartache and anxiety of these uncertain times, have been energized by the historic, hard-fought campaign for president.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2006
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger apologized yesterday for saying the lone Latina Republican lawmaker in California had a "very hot," fiery personality because of her ethnicity, a comment captured on audiotape last spring in his private office. The governor made his apology in Santa Monica, Calif., standing next to Assemblywoman Bonnie Garcia, the lawmaker Schwarzenegger and his chief of staff discussed. Garcia's parents were from Puerto Rico. "Anyone out there that feels offended by these comments, I just want to say I'm sorry," Schwarzenegger said.
NEWS
By STEVEN LUBET AND DAVID MCGOWAN | November 28, 2005
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. did not play fast and loose with judicial ethics rules in a 2002 appeal involving the Vanguard mutual fund company, as some recent reports suggest. Eight Senate Democrats have initiated an inquiry into the case, requesting information about Judge Alito's initial decision not to recuse himself even though he held a six-figure investment in Vanguard funds at the time. They will discover that Judge Alito's conduct in the matter, though not perfect, actually provides a good example of how judges should ultimately handle financial conflicts of interest.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 3, 2005
President Bush and his White House staff typically say little when asked about possible Supreme Court nominees. There is no opening on the court, they point out, so there is no reason to talk about replacements. But amid rampant speculation that Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist will announce his retirement when the court finishes its term this month, the president offered a hint this week of how he would fill the seat. "I look forward to talking to members of the Senate about the Supreme Court process, to get their opinions as well, and will do so," President Bush said at a news conference Tuesday.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | March 10, 1996
WHAT CAN be gleaned from Maryland's primary election last week? Experience counts. So does moderation. And bridge-building. And persistence.Chalk up Bob Dole's landslide victory in the Maryland presidential primary to those factors. Elijah Cummings is all but elected to Congress for the same reasons.Voters in this state clearly aren't ready for flame-throwers on the right or the left. Maryland remains, much as it has been since its founding, a state of middle temperament.Pat Buchanan never had a chance here.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
Robin Kienzle of Glen Burnie owns, trains and treats dogs, particularly Akitas. She owns four. ''Their temperament is what I admire the most,'' she says. ''They are not aggressive, are wonderfully mellow around the house, laid back, happy and loyal."Mrs. Kienzle is also a veterinary technician for the Huffard Animal Hospital in Pasadena.Two of her Akitas are brothers, 6-year-old Tanaka and Kinichi, which she adopted at age 6 weeks, and two Pausing with pets are females, Chikara, age 3, and Tora, 7 months.
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