Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTelevision Stations
IN THE NEWS

Television Stations

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. has finalized a planned purchase of Four Points Media for $200 million, the Hunt Valley-based broadcaster said Tuesday. Sinclair financed the acquisition of Four Points' television stations with a $180 million loan plus $20 million in cash that it had already paid. Sinclair acquired the Four Points TV stations, which it has been operating since Oct. 1, from affiliates of Cerberus Capital Management LP. The newly purchased assets include television stations in Salt Lake City; Austin, Texas; West Palm Beach, Fla.; Providence, R.I., and New Bedford, Mass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. plans to sell two television stations to help the company move ahead with a $1 billion planned purchase of seven ABC affiliates and a Washington-based cable news network. Selling the stations for a combined $97.4 million will allow Sinclair to comply with updated broadcast ownership rules as it aims to win regulatory approval on the purchase from Allbritton Communications by July 27. Sinclair said Monday it expects that deal to close in the third quarter.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
When Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. completes three deals announced in the past two months, it will own more television stations across the country than any other company. The Hunt Valley company will operate 134 stations in 69 markets, reaching more than a third of all U.S. homes with televisions. It will have more than doubled in size in about two years, and that's presuming it doesn't broker any more acquisitions. It still won't own stations in megamarkets such as New York or Los Angeles, but that's part of its strategy.
NEWS
May 18, 2014
David Zurawick is the czar when it comes to matters on TV. I always enjoy listening to his commentary on the radio. His column, "Surveillance images give unfiltered feel to WMAR standoff coverage," (May 14), discussed the effects on the TV station and its viewers but never discussed the real issue. Too bad The Sun's headline didn't read, "Mental illness: What are we as a society doing about this horrible problem?" No one seems to want to deal with the real issue of mental illness, and for that we should be ashamed.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
It took a decade of lobbying by child advocacy groups to win passage of a law addressing the dismal state of television programming for children. It may well take another decade to ensure that stations comply with the law. The first "report card" for commercial stations serving Maryland viewers has bad news -- and good.The bad news is that commercial stations in the area so far have been "seriously deficient" in their efforts to comply with the law, earning only a D+. But the good news for Marylanders is the grass-roots interest that produced the report.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | July 28, 1993
Commercial TV stations in Maryland and Washington barely get a passing grade when it comes to children's programming, according to a "report card" released yesterday by the Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV. The 13 monitored TV stations received an overall grade of D+."The stations in Maryland aren't doing a very good job," said campaign director Charlene Hughins Uhl. "Most of the stations had virtually nothing of quality for children on the air."The Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV is a project of two statewide organizations, Advocates for Children & Youth and Ready At Five, in association with a Washington-based national organization, the Center for Media Education.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcasting Group said yesterday it has agreed to buy television stations in Oklahoma City and Lexington, Ky., from an investment group for $63 million.In doing so, the fast-growing company will position itself as one of the leading independent broadcasting groups in the country and should gain considerable leverage at the bargaining table with Hollywood producers when it buys programming for its stations, industry analysts said."It's a very good move. They are building market position and clout.
BUSINESS
By Jube Shiver Jr. and Edmund Sanders and Jube Shiver Jr. and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - A House committee moved yesterday to block media giants from owning television stations that reach more than 35 percent of viewers nationwide, boosting efforts to reverse the Federal Communications Commission's loosening of media ownership rules. In a 40-25 vote, the House Appropriations Committee attached the media legislation to a larger spending bill that is expected to pass. The amendment prohibits the FCC from using its money to implement its proposed changes to the national ownership cap. The move came only six weeks after the FCC's party-line vote to increase the cap to 45 percent.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1995
Aiming to halt what it called an "unwarranted" 46 percent drop in its stock price, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it would buy back as much as $50 million of its common stock.The Baltimore-based chain of independent television stations has seen its share price plunge from a high of $31 on Sept. 8 to a new low of $16.25 Thursday -- $4.75 less than the initial offering price of $21 in June, when it sold 5 million shares for $105 million. The stock closed yesterday at $16.75.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 26, 1999
Television stations like to tell us in their promotional messages how committed they are to diversity. But, when it comes time to walk the walk and air programs that might be controversial because of the diversity they celebrate, many stations run for cover.Maryland Public Television is backing up its campaign to promote diversity this television season with a couple of productions dealing with gay and lesbian issues, and our local PBS outlet deserves some recognition. Not that MPT has made a major commitment to gay and lesbian programming by any stretch of the imagination.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
A man who claimed to be God rammed a stolen landscaping truck into the WMAR television station Tuesday, according to police and employees, barricading himself inside the building for several hours as journalists scrambled to cover their own story from the suburban streets outside. Baltimore County police identified the suspect on Wednesday as Vladimir Mehul Baptiste, 28, of Parkville. Baptiste faces three charges of attempted second-degree murder in addition to charges that include first-degree assault, burglary and malicious destruction of property.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Vladimir Mehul Baptiste imagined conversations with his family, according to his mother, banged on the walls of his home screaming, "What's wrong with me?" and sat in a rainstorm because he said it felt good. The man now accused of ramming a stolen truck into the WMAR television station had been hospitalized at psychiatric facilities in recent years, his mother said in an interview. She expressed concern her son was using marijuana. Baptiste was under outpatient care as recently as Monday - one day before police say he barricaded himself into the Towson offices of Channel 2 news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
What a sorry state of affairs I discovered last week when I started reporting the TV aspect of the first Democratic gubernatorial debate. I quickly came to understand that Baltimoreans would not be seeing the event, which will be staged Wednesday at the University of Maryland, College Park and produced by WRC-TV, the NBC-owned station in Washington. But how could that be, especially with three candidates hardly known in the city: Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur?
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. is one of several large broadcasters that could be forced to sell television stations or other assets or rethink future acquisitions under new media ownership rules the Federal Communications Commission is set to consider later this month. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler proposed changes that would restrict the number of TV stations controlled by a single owner in a market, a step designed to protect competition and diversity in local media. Specifically, the FCC is examining broadcasters' use of sharing arrangements for sales as well as facilities and employees.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said Monday it finalized its planned purchase of 18 television stations owned by Barrington Broadcasting Group for $370 million. Those stations, plus another six Barrington stations that Sinclair will operate or service, are located in 15 markets, including Syracuse, N.Y., Colorado Springs, Colo., Flint and Traverse City, Mich., and Myrtle Beach, S.C. Sinclair funded the purchase through cash on hand. Because of a conflict under Federal Communication Commission ownership rules, Sinclair sold its FOX stations in Syracuse, N.Y., and Peoria, Ill. The company also assigned a local marketing agreement and purchase option on a MNT affiliate in Syracuse to Bristlecone Broadcasting, while selling off license assets of five other stations.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said Wednesday that it plans to buy eight television stations from New Age Media for $90 million, continuing a string of recent station acquisitions. The stations are spread throughout three markets, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, Pa., Tallahassee, Fla., and Gainesville, Fla., and give the broadcaster a mix of FOX, MyNetwork, CW, CBS and NBC affiliates. "We are excited to be adding the New Age stations to our portfolio, growing our presence in Pennsylvania and Florida, and further diversifying our affiliation mix," CEO David Smith said in the company's announcement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Christopher Gaul, former managing editor of the Catholic Review and reporter for The Sun and The Evening Sun and area television stations, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Essex. He was 72. He joined the Catholic Review as a writer in 1995 and worked there until he retired in 2005. George P. Matysek Jr., the Review's assistant managing editor, remembered Mr. Gaul as a mentor to the junior writers at the paper, taking time to carefully edit their work. "He really showed us what went into a good story," Mr. Matysek said, "He was very nurturing in how he dealt with younger writers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it is embarking on an aggressive round of investments in its television stations nationwide, and warned Wall Street analysts that this spending will temporarily drag down the Cockeysville company's financial numbers.Sinclair cast its announcement as a reaction to changes in the television industry. Independent television station owners like Sinclair face ever-increasing competition from cable and satellite television, movies and the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
On Thursday morning, I read a Page 1 article in The Baltimore Sun that featured Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake saying how sad she was about the “state of our community.” She was referring to the shocking run of 29 shootings and 10 deaths in a six-day span in Baltimore. The article also included quotes from Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts saying the department's initial “messaging” about the crimes had been “terrible.” I don't cover crime, but I do cover messaging.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.