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SPORTS
By David Selig | July 23, 2012
  Orioles top prospect Dylan Bundy will be featured in a segment on the premiere episode of Sports Illustrated's new television series, which debuts Tuesday night on NBC Sports Network. The 19-year-old right-hander is also the subject of a story by SI's Tom Verducci in the upcoming issue of the magazine. The television series -- which seems a bit like ESPN's E:60 -- airs at 9 p.m. According to an email from an SI spokesman, "The show will take Sports Illustrated's renowned editorial pieces and play them out through feature segments with original reporting from SI journalists.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The hit television show "House of Cards" will stay in Maryland, even though state incentives offered to keep the Netflix series here came up millions of dollars short of what the producers wanted. Gov. Martin O'Malley and Media Rights Capital announced Friday that they had reached an agreement that would allow the third season of the political drama to be filmed in the state. The producers said they expect to begin filming over the next several months. But the accord negotiated by O'Malley included no new money to make up for lawmakers' failure this month to give "House of Cards" the full $15 million the series producers were seeking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Baltimorean David Simon, whose groundbreaking television series "The Wire" examined the institutions of his hometown with a passionate and unsparing eye, today won a 2010 MacArthur "genius" award. The 50-year-old Simon is one of only a few people ever to receive one of the prestigious fellowships for work in television. The MacArthur carries a $500,000, no-strings-attached grant parceled out over five years. "The great value of this award is that it will make it easier for all of us to argue for stories that might not otherwise be perceived as popular television," Simon said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Responding to a threat that the "House of Cards" television series may leave Maryland if it doesn't get more tax credits, the House of Delegates adopted budget language Thursday requiring the state to seize the production company's property if it stops filming in the state. Media Rights Capital, the Beverly Hills, Calif., company producing the popular Netflix show, wrote Gov. Martin O'Malley that it was putting off work on its third season until it could be assured that sufficient tax credits would be approved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
Television writer David Simon might have just picked up a MacArthur Award, commonly called a "genius grant. " School principal and super mom Debbie Phelps might excel at educating others. And Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake might have the intellectual firepower to run an entire city. But that doesn't mean they're up to the challenge of repeating the sixth grade. Indeed, Simon had to rely on two petite powerhouses — middle school students Tyteyona Berry and Rickelle Carter — to defeat five other teams Saturday night in the "Are You Smarter Than a Sixth-Grader" fundraising competition.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Christopher Gaul, former managing editor of the Catholic Review and reporter for The Sun and The Evening Sun and area television stations, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Essex. He was 72. He joined the Catholic Review as a writer in 1995 and worked there until he retired in 2005. George P. Matysek Jr., the Review's assistant managing editor, remembered Mr. Gaul as a mentor to the junior writers at the paper, taking time to carefully edit their work. "He really showed us what went into a good story," Mr. Matysek said, "He was very nurturing in how he dealt with younger writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2005
Television series are pouring out of studios' vaults for the DVD market -- and the cash flow -- but the majority offer few extras. This week's entrants are no different: A couple have some decent added treats, but most are of the bare-bones variety, such as Universal's set of the first two seasons of the NBC detective series McCloud ($40). Dennis Weaver played a wily marshal from Taos, N.M., who goes to New York to recapture an escaped prisoner. Afterward, he found himself on temporary assignment at Manhattan's 27th Precinct.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | June 13, 1992
Barry Levinson plans to proceed with a television series based on the Baltimore Police Department's homicide squad after resolving a plagiarism complaint he had against the producers of another TV series, said an assistant to the Baltimore-born director.Mr. Levinson had charged Warner Bros., the producer of an upcoming CBS drama, "Polish Hill," with plagiarizing elements of the 1991 book, "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," on which he was basing his own series. "Homicide" was written by Sun reporter David Simon, who spent a year with the police detectives who investigate murders.
FEATURES
By Brad Kuhn and Brad Kuhn,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 7, 1997
More evidence that the theme-restaurant business is a hard life: Hard Rock Cafe, which has had flat sales in its restaurants, is branching into television.It also plans to announce a new music-recording venture later this month."Hard Rock Live," a weekly one-hour television music series produced by the co-creator of MTV's popular "Unplugged," is scheduled to debut in March on the VH-1 cable-music channel.The $35 million production, to be taped at Sony Studios in New York, is sponsored by VH-1, Pontiac automobiles and Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By Ron Miller and Ron Miller,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 15, 1991
This fall NBC will gamble that America is ready for a weekly series built around a relationship between a man and a woman who talk to each other in sign language.Of course, they aren't exactly ordinary people. Mark Harmon is one of TV's busiest leading men. And Marlee Matlin is the Oscar-winning star of "Children of a Lesser God," the acclaimed 1986 feature film.But their new series, "Reasonable Doubts," is the first to star a hearing-impaired performer such as Matlin, which means it comes with built-in problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
If Baltimore is indeed becoming Hollywood east - and who are we to argue the point? - then here's your handy map to the movie stars' homes. Only in this case, it's a map to where movie stars have roamed - sites captured forever on film and TV, going back to the 1970s. We begin our journey with a pair of television series, both set in Washington, but filmed right here in Charm City and its environs. And we've also pinpointed a couple of spots from films that are classic Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014
Though it came into Sunday's Golden Globes awards as the leading TV series with four nominations, the Baltimore-shot series "House of Cards" quickly buckled under the weight of "Breaking Bad. " But star Robin Wright snapped up the best drama actress for her work as the scheming Claire Underwood. It was a banner weekend for Wright, who also just got engaged to actor Ben Foster. The Netflix production and cast members Kevin Spacey and Corey Stoll lost in their contests for best drama series (to "Breaking Bad")
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
For an agricultural operation that is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, Maple Lawn Turkey Farm is adept at blending the old and the new. Tried-and-true methods still prevail at Maple Lawn. But the Fulton farm also embraces modern concepts, such as raising free-range birds and using large arrays of solar panels to generate enough electricity to offset what it consumes each year. And just in time for Thanksgiving, the turkey farm's success story will unfold on the airwaves Tuesday in the debut of a new half-hour TV series featuring farms across the state.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Christopher Gaul, former managing editor of the Catholic Review and reporter for The Sun and The Evening Sun and area television stations, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Essex. He was 72. He joined the Catholic Review as a writer in 1995 and worked there until he retired in 2005. George P. Matysek Jr., the Review's assistant managing editor, remembered Mr. Gaul as a mentor to the junior writers at the paper, taking time to carefully edit their work. "He really showed us what went into a good story," Mr. Matysek said, "He was very nurturing in how he dealt with younger writers.
SPORTS
By David Selig | July 23, 2012
  Orioles top prospect Dylan Bundy will be featured in a segment on the premiere episode of Sports Illustrated's new television series, which debuts Tuesday night on NBC Sports Network. The 19-year-old right-hander is also the subject of a story by SI's Tom Verducci in the upcoming issue of the magazine. The television series -- which seems a bit like ESPN's E:60 -- airs at 9 p.m. According to an email from an SI spokesman, "The show will take Sports Illustrated's renowned editorial pieces and play them out through feature segments with original reporting from SI journalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
More and more these days, it seems as if the most interesting TV projects are coming from new and different places. "House of Cards,"  which Netflix is making in Baltimore, leads the parade. But DirecTV is getting in the game, too, and this week debuts a six-part mini-series about a transgendered contract killer played by Chloe Sevigny ("Big Love," "Boys Don't Cry"). "Hit & Miss," which premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday on DirecTV's Audience Channel is a British import created by Paul Abbott, who is usually praised for "Shameless"and "State of Play.
FEATURES
By Martin Miller and Martin Miller,Los Angeles Times | July 17, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- Isaiah Washington, who was written out as a major character on ABC's Grey's Anatomy after publicly using a homophobic slur, has been written into NBC's promising new fall show Bionic Woman, network executives said yesterday at the annual summer television press tour. The controversial actor, who has been attacking his former network as racist for firing him, will appear in five of the new show's first six episodes. In spite of Washington's obvious baggage, Ben Silverman, co-chairman of NBC Entertainment and Universal Media Studios, said he was elated to land the actor, who became the butt of national jokes this year when he entered a Malibu, Calif.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
The show opens with a drumbeat, a horse running, and the words: "In the world of the thoroughbred, one thing you can count on is the unexpected." The show is "Thoroughbred," a 13-part series about life at Bonita Farm, the Boniface family's pride and joy in Darlington. The first 30-minute episode begins at 8 p.m. Tuesday on the cable channel Animal Planet. Subsequent episodes will be televised Tuesdays at that hour through June 19 (and also at 7 p.m. Saturdays). I have seen the first episode, and let me tell you, this is tonic for our state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | July 3, 2012
Ah yes, we return this week to the "Real Housewives of New York City" with another fight about London, a single storyline with LuAnn's pregnancy problems, and a few jabs by Ramona. Honestly, there was nothing new with the NYC ladies this week. It felt like this episode was just a repeat of the last but this time with slightly different dialogue and different scenery. Here are some of the highlights. Heather and Aviva meet in the park to chat about the London issue with Ramona.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
WBAL-TV won a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a series on judges by investigative reporter Jayne Miller, the Radio Television Digital News Association announced Tuesday. Here's part of what the press release: The award for Best Video Investigative Reporting is for a series by WBAL-TV 11 News I-Team lead investigative reporter Jayne Miller called "Judging The Judges. " The award-winning investigation opens the book on judges who misbehave, violate ethics and break the law. The story focuses ion judicial accountability and reveals a system where reprimands are often kept private and judges remain on the bench...
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