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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Chesapeake High School senior Tylr Scones says he developed an interest in cooking while growing up watching his father, who he said would "go into the kitchen, look at the cabinets and all of a sudden he'd walk out with a gourmet meal. " It's a knack that father has passed down to son, who hosts a weekly culinary segment on the school's Video Production Company's daily live television program, "Good Morning, Chesapeake. " The segment, aptly titled, "Cooking With Scones," runs each Friday and is a brief portion of a television program that is about eight minutes long.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad | February 10, 2014
Hey, "The Walking Dead" is back on AMC! It's been two months since we've been able to spend our Sunday nights watching men and women in tattered clothing brutally slaughtering rotting men and women in even more tattered clothing/skin, unless you happened to catch that one really weird episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" on the Memorable Entertainment network. Sunday night's return - titled "After" - was a very strong showing, in this humble blogger's opinion. If you didn't start getting a little choked up during the scene where little Carl almost has to squeeze the trigger to put down his father, Rick, you might want to be tested to see if you're a serial killer.
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NEWS
December 26, 2013
In response David Zurawik 's column, "A 'NewsHour' filled with reruns and PBS promotion - not so much the news" (Dec. 19), I have to respectfully disagree. I worked at the NewsHour for two years, from 2011 to 2013, and had been an avid viewer long before then. I watch the NewsHour every night, but I don't watch "Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly," so the Fred de Sam Lazaro piece examining abortion in El Salvador was reporting that I certainly would not have seen otherwise, and am glad I did. This practice of airing segments that appear on other shows within the same network is common.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
In response David Zurawik 's column, "A 'NewsHour' filled with reruns and PBS promotion - not so much the news" (Dec. 19), I have to respectfully disagree. I worked at the NewsHour for two years, from 2011 to 2013, and had been an avid viewer long before then. I watch the NewsHour every night, but I don't watch "Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly," so the Fred de Sam Lazaro piece examining abortion in El Salvador was reporting that I certainly would not have seen otherwise, and am glad I did. This practice of airing segments that appear on other shows within the same network is common.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad | February 10, 2014
Hey, "The Walking Dead" is back on AMC! It's been two months since we've been able to spend our Sunday nights watching men and women in tattered clothing brutally slaughtering rotting men and women in even more tattered clothing/skin, unless you happened to catch that one really weird episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" on the Memorable Entertainment network. Sunday night's return - titled "After" - was a very strong showing, in this humble blogger's opinion. If you didn't start getting a little choked up during the scene where little Carl almost has to squeeze the trigger to put down his father, Rick, you might want to be tested to see if you're a serial killer.
NEWS
Aegis report | November 4, 2013
Harford County Government has a new television show called "Harford Happenings" airing on Harford Cable Network, and hosted by the county's Public Information Officer Sherrie Johnson. Each month, Johnson will bring an inside look at county government, its departments and its staff. The goal of the show is to educate the public on the activities of their government. "We want to let people know the positive things that are happening in Harford County Government and I am so excited to have this opportunity to showcase our initiatives," Johnson said in a press release.
NEWS
April 15, 1999
Westminster will be a featured town on Maryland Public Television's "Livelyhood: Our Towns" program at 7 p.m. Sunday.Part of the program will focus on the city's volunteer firefighters.Information: 410-581-4293.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Westminster, Reese, Pleasant Valley and Manchester responded at 8: 52 a.m. Tuesday to a building fire in the first block of W. Main St. Units were out 45 minutes.PoliceWestminster: A resident of Burning Tree Court told police Sunday that a bicycle was stolen from a shed at the rear of the property.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission sent a strong message yesterday that it will push for expanded competition in telecommunications as it granted permission for Bell Atlantic Corp. to transmit television programs over its lines on a commercial basis in Dover Township, N.J.The unanimous FCC decision makes the Philadelphia-based phone company the first telephone company with regulatory approval to offer "video dial tone" on anything but a trial basis.Brushing aside objections from the National Cable Television Association, the FCC ruled that Bell Atlantic's proposal would promote the public interest by bringing competition and broader choices to the monopoly-dominated cable TV business.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- There is good news for news in the Nielsen ratings. At a time when many prime-time entertainment series are losing audience to cable and other TV competitors, the four network news magazines have registered an increase in their ratings in the last year.One of them, CBS' venerable "60 Minutes," is the season's top-rated series to date, with ratings 1.4 percent ahead of last year.CBS' "48 Hours," meanwhile, is up 45 percent over a year ago. ABC's "20/20" is 9 percent higher and regularly wins its Friday night time period, and the network's younger news magazine, "PrimeTime Live," has improved its ratings by 10 percent this year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1995
A new show on Baltimore's cable channel showcases crime and flashes mug shots of wanted suspects into homes throughout the city. And from all indications, viewers can't get enough.Since its debut last week, "Baltimore's Most Wanted" has helped local police agencies solve seven cases and nab several suspects sought in crimes ranging from failing to pay child support to holding up downtown banks.One man turned himself in after seeing his picture on the screen. Another caller tipped off police that a wanted felon was sitting in a jail cell at the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
Aegis report | November 4, 2013
Harford County Government has a new television show called "Harford Happenings" airing on Harford Cable Network, and hosted by the county's Public Information Officer Sherrie Johnson. Each month, Johnson will bring an inside look at county government, its departments and its staff. The goal of the show is to educate the public on the activities of their government. "We want to let people know the positive things that are happening in Harford County Government and I am so excited to have this opportunity to showcase our initiatives," Johnson said in a press release.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Chesapeake High School senior Tylr Scones says he developed an interest in cooking while growing up watching his father, who he said would "go into the kitchen, look at the cabinets and all of a sudden he'd walk out with a gourmet meal. " It's a knack that father has passed down to son, who hosts a weekly culinary segment on the school's Video Production Company's daily live television program, "Good Morning, Chesapeake. " The segment, aptly titled, "Cooking With Scones," runs each Friday and is a brief portion of a television program that is about eight minutes long.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 22, 2007
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER HOLLY Hunter arrives in a weekly television series tomorrow night with the debut of cable channel TNT's Saving Grace. And while the drama about a hard-drinking police detective who is saved by a tobacco-chewing angel isn't exactly divine entertainment, it is the first in a wave of spiritually themed TV shows about to wash over prime time -- the next semi-big attempt by Hollywood to speak to the post-Sept. 11 hole in America's soul. SAVING GRACE / / premieres at 10 p.m. tomorrow on TNT ONLINE David Zurawik discusses Saving Grace at baltimoresun.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
Midlife carries some boomers to unexpected places. Take, for instance, budding TV personality Sherry Parrish. The social worker who directs resident life at Charlestown retirement community recently spent the afternoon taping television voiceovers. She is host of the pilot for What's Next? -- a program you might also call Senior Makeovers. At the moment, though, she's still chuckling over the conversation she had five months ago with an eager producer. "I sat there with my head shaking," she says.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2007
To collect cash for its television programming, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. played hardball last month by pulling its stations from cable systems in the Midwest and South and sending a strong message to the industry that its payment demands are serious. The stakes are higher for the Hunt Valley broadcaster in a fight to obtain similar fees from Comcast, the nation's largest cable operator and the biggest player in the Baltimore area. A source familiar with the negotiations said yesterday that Sinclair is prepared to cut off its programming to Comcast systems at 2 a.m. tomorrow because talks between the two sides have stalled.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | February 25, 2007
With a video camera capturing their every move, kindergartners Austin Klunk and Molli Rymer dropped clay into buckets on either side of a scale. "What happens if we put another piece of clay in only one of the buckets?" teacher Anne Heidenreich asked Molli. "It gets bigger," the 6-year-old said. "Bigger means you grow," Heidenreich said. "It gets heavier." "Yes, it gets heavier," Molli agreed. The students at Forest Lakes Elementary School were taking part in a math lesson that was being filmed as part of Your Public Schools, a bimonthly TV program that focuses on what's happening in county schools.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez Reporter David Michael Ettlin contributed to this article | December 2, 1990
On Friday afternoon, people in Aberdeen knew Joseph DeBartolo as the guy who cut their meats at Michael's Food Rite for the past year and a half, lived in a trailer park, and regularly beat the competition in a dart league at the Eagle's Nest."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | November 30, 2006
There are now something like 10,000 reality shows on TV, and the whole stupid concept shows no signs of going away soon. Apparently no subject is too ridiculous or mundane that it can't be turned into a reality show anymore. With the click of the remote, you can now watch people sing badly, traipse through mosquito-infested jungles, get their cheeks sucked out and their stomachs tucked, and have their houses made over by professional design geeks. You can watch wives swap families, fat people lose weight, cops pull over drunk drivers, and celebrities dance the tango.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | January 8, 2007
Streaks of fuchsia, brown, and denim blue went flying out of the box like confetti as a dozen excited teenage girls snatched pieces of fabric in hopes of creating the masterpiece of the day: a purse. "You found denim?" asked one member of Columbia's Wilde Lake High School fashion club. "Yeah, I did," Kelly Hetzler, 16, proudly responded as she held up a large piece of dark-blue denim. "It was at the bottom of the bag." Their after-school club, which was formed this fall and has 30 members, reflects a resurgence in fashion interest among American high-schoolers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | November 30, 2006
There are now something like 10,000 reality shows on TV, and the whole stupid concept shows no signs of going away soon. Apparently no subject is too ridiculous or mundane that it can't be turned into a reality show anymore. With the click of the remote, you can now watch people sing badly, traipse through mosquito-infested jungles, get their cheeks sucked out and their stomachs tucked, and have their houses made over by professional design geeks. You can watch wives swap families, fat people lose weight, cops pull over drunk drivers, and celebrities dance the tango.
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