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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
Ralph Warren Hills, a top production manager at a Baltimore television station who helped shape what thousands of people viewed over four decades, from children's programming to live sporting events, died from complications of Parkinson's disease Thursday at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 73. Hills, better known as Warren or "Hillsy" to his friends, was born and raised in Baltimore and worked in local television for most of his life before retiring 12 years ago from WBAL-TV. His father was a doctor and his mother a homemaker and civic activist.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Blair Wheeler had fished only a few times in her life when she decided to rent a charter boat off Tracys Landing near Deale in late July to celebrate the respective birthdays of her husband and brother. It was the first time Wheeler had gone fishing on the Chesapeake Bay. It probably won't be the last. Wheeler, a 25-year-old from Herndon, Va., who works as a television news producer in Washington, became the first person to win the Diamond Jim fishing contest's $25,000 grand prize in the nine years since the Maryland Department of Natural Resources revived it as part of the agency's Maryland Fishing Challenge.
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NEWS
December 15, 1990
Services for Deborah L. Bock-Leader, a Baltimore native who was a television producer, will be held at 1 p.m. Monday at the Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Road.Mrs. Bock-Leader, who was 38, died of cancer Dec. 9 at her home in Santa Monica, Calif.For the past three years, she produced follow-up segments for the NBC series "Unsolved Mysteries" and was a director for the show.She also produced a segment of the "America Undercover" series on Home Box Office and a segment of the "Silk Screen" series on the Public Broadcasting Service.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
Ralph Warren Hills, a top production manager at a Baltimore television station who helped shape what thousands of people viewed over four decades, from children's programming to live sporting events, died from complications of Parkinson's disease Thursday at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 73. Hills, better known as Warren or "Hillsy" to his friends, was born and raised in Baltimore and worked in local television for most of his life before retiring 12 years ago from WBAL-TV. His father was a doctor and his mother a homemaker and civic activist.
NEWS
February 16, 1997
Sister Mary James Kaufman, 89, teacherSister Mary James Kaufman, S.S.N.D., who taught at schools in Puerto Rico and several states including Maryland, died of heart failure Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 89.Born in Washington, she entered the order of School Sisters of Notre Dame in 1925 and professed her vows in 1929. She earned a bachelor's degree from Mount Mary College in Milwaukee in 1939.She began her career teaching first grade in New York and New Jersey schools, then taught in Puerto Rico, Florida and Maryland.
NEWS
May 15, 1997
L. Jeffrey Selznick,64, a film and television producer and the president of the Louis B. Mayer Foundation, died Monday in Los Angeles. His brother, Daniel, said he suffered a heart attack.Mr. Selznick was a son of film producer David O. Selznick and theatrical producer Irene Mayer Selznick. Since 1989, he had headed the Mayer Foundation, begun 40 years ago by his maternal grandfather to support education in the arts.In 1989, Mr. Selznick and his brother were the executive producers of "The Making of a Legend: 'Gone With the Wind,' " a documentary about the classic film produced by their father.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
"When I had my daughter, it was the toughest time of my life," says Baltimore native Jean Marie Fiumara. "I wanted so badly for somebody to tell me it was going to be all right ... that this is normal." By "this" she means a baby's drooling or crying, a mother's lack of time for even a phone call, or the ways doubt creeps in when one is caring for an infant. "I went from a full-time career as a television producer ... who used to make major decisions to a person who couldn't even think," she says.
FEATURES
September 13, 1991
File this one in the life-imitates-art-imitates-life department: The Baltimore-born producer for the sydicated program"Emergency Call" had an emergency of his own while in town this summer to tape segments scheduled to air Sunday night (Channel 11, 12:30 a.m.)Allan Holzman, a 1964 graduate of Forest Park High School, had returned to Baltimore in mid-July for extensive filming with city ambulance crews when his pregnant wife went into premature labor. Rushed to University Hospital, Susan Justin gave birth to a pound, 5-ounce girl, Shayne, on July 16.The baby remains in intensive care but is doing well and breathing on her own, Mr. Holzman said.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
The news director of WBAL-TV announced yesterday that she would leave the station, saying personal ties were luring her back to Philadelphia. "I have decided to quit, for the first time in my crazy career, to care about my personal life," Margaret Cronan said yesterday in an interview. She said she decided to move to avoid the long-distance relationship she has been maintaining with her boyfriend, who lives there. Cronan, 38, also referred to job opportunities that are likely to arise in Philadelphia once her current contract ends.
NEWS
September 20, 1991
Nicholas W. Russo, 75, who raised thoroughbred horses with his daughter in Frederick County and was the creator and producer of a widely syndicated sports television show in the 1960s, died Saturday at Frederick Memorial Hospital of complications from diabetes.Funeral services were private.Since 1988, Mr. Russo has raised horses with his daughter, Stephanie Peddicord, at Brush Hill Farm near New Market.He was chairman of the board of GG Communications, which he started after he created the sports show, which was called "The Flying Fisherman."
NEWS
By Norman Lear | January 2, 2012
I was recently shown a picture from one of the Occupy protests taking place across the country. It featured a young woman surrounded by police. She was the only protester in the picture, but she didn't seem intimidated. All by herself, up against the police barricade, she held a handwritten sign saying simply, "I am a born again American. " I've never met this woman, but I think I know exactly what she's feeling. I had my first "born again American" moment 30 years ago, when I was moved to outrage and action by a group of hate-preaching televangelists who were trying to claim sole ownership of patriotism, faith and flag for the far right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
I expected the worst from CNN's debate Tuesday when I saw John King interviewing Wayne Newton outside the hall during "John King USA. " I know Newton is Mr. Las Vegas, but I still wondered why anyone at CNN thinks it is a wise use of one of the best political reporters in the country to have him doing pre-debate chat-ups with the likes of Newton -- unless he's talking to the veteran entertainer about the politics of too much cosmetic surgery....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Joyce L. Green, an educational television specialist and a former Maryland Public Television producer, died Dec. 6 of complications from multiple sclerosis at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 63. Ms. Green was born in Baltimore - the youngest of five sisters - and raised on Beaumont Avenue in Govans. After graduating from St. Mary's parochial school in 1960, she attended Mercy High School and was a member of the school's first graduating class in 1964.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Joyce L. Green, an educational television specialist and a former Maryland Public Television producer, died Dec. 6 of complications from multiple sclerosis at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 63. Ms. Green was born in Baltimore - the youngest of five sisters - and raised on Beaumont Avenue in Govans. After graduating from St. Mary's parochial school in 1960, she attended Mercy High School and was a member of the school's first graduating class in 1964.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 8, 2008
Patricia Herold Nielsen, an environmental activist and founding member of the Eastern Shore's Chester River Association, died of breast cancer Feb. 28 at her Brooklyn, N.Y., home. She was 59. Born and raised Patricia Herold in Westfield, N.J., she earned a degree in English literature from Emmanuel College in Boston in 1970. She began her broadcasting career at WBUR-FM in Boston as an associate producer, and later joined WCVB-TV, also in Boston, as a member of its award-winning documentary unit.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
Clifford R. Jarrett Jr., an actor who was the first producer of Maryland Public Television's The Critics' Place, died of cancer Friday at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. The former Bolton Hill resident was 62. Born in Baltimore, he attended Gilman School and went into radio broadcasting on the Eastern Shore in his late teens. He recalled being on duty in March 1962 while a major storm lashed Ocean City's Boardwalk and destroyed numerous buildings. During the later 1960s through early 1970s, Mr. Jarrett worked at WJZ-TV as a producer and floor director for news, prime time and public affairs programming, including Family Counselor, which was syndicated and received an Emmy from the Washington Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 17, 1995
Author John Grisham's good friend, novelist Stephen King, once gave what Mr. Grisham considers some very sound advice about selling a best-selling book to the movie industry."
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | June 11, 1991
Black teen-agers have been big fans of "Video Soul" and other Black Entertainment Television programs since the cable network made its debut 11 years ago. Now Robert L. Johnson, chairman and founder of BET, is banking on their loyalty with a new magazine for black teens called Young Sisters and Brothers.For the past few months, BET has aired slick commercials during music video programs, urging young viewers to phone a 900-number and order 10 issues of YSB for $11.95. Paige Communications, a BET subsidiary, plans to distribute the first issue in August.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
ATHENS - Two years ago, Christy Nicolay was introducing largemouth bass to television viewers across the country. This summer, she is the behind-the-scenes host for the millions of spectators at the 35 Olympic venues in and around the city. Whatever fans hear or see beyond the athletic pursuits themselves - from videos describing sports and introducing competitors to the music and announcements - started with Nicolay, the executive producer of sport presentation. Add it up and it's 151 announcers, a play list of 1,900 songs and a library of 600 videos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2004
Thank goodness for British television drama. Though American networks have all but switched from making new (costly) dramas to pumping out (cheaper) reality TV shows, the British are sticking to what they've done well for decades. After a week of Trump-mania - and the finale of NBC's The Apprentice - tonight's premiere of two soul-stirring, brain-engaging, multipart dramas from the other side of the Atlantic could not be more welcome. It has been seven years since Helen Mirren's landmark character, Inspector Jane Tennison of Prime Suspect fame, first solved a case for the London Metropolitan Police.
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