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NEWS
By Geraldine Fabrikant and Geraldine Fabrikant,New York Times News Service | September 1, 1994
In moves that could lead to a change of ownership for one and perhaps even two of the three major television networks, Time Warner Inc. is negotiating to buy NBC Network and Walt Disney Co. has apparently contacted CBS Inc. about buying that company.Time Warner, which already has extensive holdings in cable television, has held talks in recent weeks with General Electric Co. about buying its NBC Network subsidiary and some of NBC's cable services for about $2.5 billion in stock and cash, according to several people familiar with the negotiations.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
A military judge has ordered CNN and CBS to turn over unaired footage of interviews with a Naval Academy midshipman who was the alleged victim of sexual assault at an off-campus party in 2012. Marine Corps Col. Daniel J. Daugherty ordered the TV networks on Wednesday to provide a portion of footage that he deemed was not duplicative of other interviews and testimony from the female midshipman. The footage is sought by attorneys for Midshipman Joshua Tate of Nashville, who is facing a March court-martial on charges of aggravated sexual assault and making a false statement.
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BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | December 5, 1993
NEW YORK -- Like mainframe computers and gas guzzlers, television networks were supposed to be extinct by now. Dogged by aggressive cable companies for most of the 1980s, (( networks were said to be spiraling toward broadcast oblivion.But an afternoon stroll past the renovated Ed Sullivan Theater on Broadway offers another view of the networks' prospects. The area, once a decrepit strip of shops north of Times Square, has been transformed -- thanks largely to the theater's new tenant, late-night television celebrity David Letterman, and the hundreds fans he attracts.
NEWS
By Sam Farmer | September 26, 2010
We always hear about NFL players "on and off the field," whether they are good or bad people, leaders or followers. But what about when they're neither on nor off the field, but stuck in that middle ground? In other words, how do they behave on the sideline? Brandon Jacobs, the Giants running back, gave us a hint Sunday when he came off the field and, in frustration, heaved his helmet roughly 10 rows behind the Giants' bench. Although TV cameras missed the toss, they did zoom in on the Colts fan who initially refused to give back the helmet and ultimately had it pried from his grasp by a security guard.
FEATURES
By Reid Kanaley and Reid Kanaley,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1995
Need a break from television? How about logging onto the Internet for some new diversion?Oh, no.There's that darn NBC peacock staring back from the computer screen. And what's that? Hey, the CBS Cyclops.There are ABC and Fox and MTV, HBO, Nickelodeon and Court TV, and on and on. Television is invading the Internet in a big way.It's no wonder. With an estimated 30 million users dishing out $1 billion last year for on-line access, the growing global web of interconnected computers represents an irresistible new venue and another platform for blatant promotion.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1992
In a further deregulatory action aimed at helping the shrinking fortunes of the three major television networks, the Federal Communications Commission yesterday unanimously overturned a 22-year prohibition against networks' owning cable TV systems.The 5-0 decision, which followed the FCC's promise last year to conduct a thorough review of decades-old regulations governing television networks and local stations, is designed to give the networks new areas in which to expand in the face of growing competition from cable.
NEWS
November 26, 1990
The rapid evolution of television requires alteration of federal rules governing the production and ownership of programs. Twenty years ago, the networks' domination of the national TV picture was total. The arguments of movie producers to bar the networks from owning shows and production studios made sense. No longer.Diversity in programming has vanished as the number of production studios has diminished. In 1970, eight Hollywood studios provided 39 percent of the networks' program supply.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | June 19, 1992
In a further deregulatory action aimed at helping the shrinking fortunes of the three major television networks, the Federal Communications Commission yesterday unanimously overturned a 22-year prohibition against networks' owning cable TV systems.The 5-0 decision, which followed the FCC's promise last year to conduct a thorough review of decades-old regulations governing televisionnetworks and local stations, is designed to give the networks new areas in which to expand in the face of growing competition from cable.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 18, 1994
However brief it turns out to be, any U.S. invasion of Haiti is likely to be the most minutely documented military action in history.Several hundred reporters and photographers from television networks, newspapers and magazines are already in Haiti, with the most advanced equipment ever brought to a potential combat zone.In addition, representatives of news organizations say the Pentagon has promised far more access to the U.S. side of the operation than in any recent military activity, with pool reporters augmented by representatives from individual news organizations aboard U.S. ships and aircraft taking part in the invasion.
NEWS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | June 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hoping to stave off a federally imposed system of ratings for violence on television, the nation's four broadcast networks have agreed to provide a warning to parents just before shows laden with mayhem are shown.The warning would also be made available to newspapers and magazines that publish television listings, allowing them to establish what would amount to a special coding for violent shows.The agreement, which will be announced by top officials of ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox in Washington today and could take effect during the next programming season, comes amid a growing outcry in Congress about the depiction of violence in entertainment programming and its possible harmful effects on some viewers.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 22, 2008
Summertime TV has been dabbling in game shows and contestant humiliation since 2001, when NBC debuted Fear Factor with an episode featuring players lowered into a pit filled with rats. But this year, the networks have taken their game to a whole new level with programs that show competitors getting punched in the face and falling into a pit of mud as they try to climb an obstacle-course wall - or players dressed like bugs getting slammed against car windshields. One entire series is built on the premise of contestants being forced to eat rich foods like clam chowder or cream pie until they are stuffed - and then put through physical paces intended to make them sick.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | February 19, 2007
When her children were young, Jenny Lauck flipped on Today or Good Morning America as she brewed her morning coffee and tended her babies. But several years ago, the 34-year-old mother of three stopped watching the morning shows. After getting TiVo, she had no patience to sit through multiple commercial breaks during a live newscast. On top of that, the segments seemed frivolous. "Watching morning television for me is the equivalent of reading People magazine in the dentist's office," said Lauck, who writes for Web sites from her home in Santa Rosa, Calif.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | November 1, 2006
The shift in the bedrock of primetime television is evident in the fortunes of NBC's no-frills game show 1 vs 100 and its lavish drama Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. Last month, NBC added 1 vs 100, a quiz program featuring stunningly easy questions, a roster of talent that begins and ends with B-list comic Bob Saget, and contestants who compete in a stadium-like setting with 100 opponents at a time. Instantly, it became the most-watched Friday-night show on network TV with 12.3 million viewers.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 5, 2006
Weeks before the fall TV season officially begins, television networks are abandoning five decades of tradition in hopes of attracting younger audiences. Beginning today, two of NBC's most eagerly anticipated new dramas, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip and Kidnapped, will begin arriving in the mailboxes of Net-flix subscribers who have signed up for an advance glimpse of the series. Early next month, NBC's action drama Heroes will be available for downloading on iTunes - weeks before the show's on-air debut.
FEATURES
By BILL CARTER and BILL CARTER,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2006
Concerned about the recent decision by the Federal Communications Commission to fine television networks for material deemed indecent, the WB network will broadcast a new drama next week that it has censored over the objections of the program's creator. But first, the network will offer the uncut version of the pilot episode on its Web site, starting today - a further example of the new strategies network television may be pursuing, both to escape government-imposed restrictions and to find alternative ways of reaching viewers.
NEWS
By RICHARD BOUDREAUX and RICHARD BOUDREAUX,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2006
BAGHDAD -- Two German engineers held captive in Iraq appeared with their captors in a video aired yesterday by Al-Jazeera television, the first sign of the pair since gunmen seized them three days earlier. Elsewhere in Iraq, bombings and shootings claimed at least nine lives, including that of a 13-year-old girl in Basra. The German captives, seated on a floor with at least four armed men standing behind them, could be seen speaking on the televised 35-second tape but not heard. The Arab satellite channel said the video "shows the two men urging their government to help secure their release."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | March 20, 1992
PHOENIX -- Commissioner Paul Tagliabue is now going to try to convince the NFL owners that less is really more.Tagliabue closed the annual March meetings yesterday by putting the immediate focus on a special meeting he has called for March 30 in Dallas to discuss giving the television networks a rebate for 1993 in return for a two-year extension of their contract in 1994-95."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission voted yesterday to allow broadcast television networks to buy local cable television systems, a move that could hasten a basic realignment of the television industry.Rather than having one local over-the-air affiliate station in a city, for example, a network could operate a local cable system offering dozens of channels of programming. That probably would alter, and perhaps terminate, the traditional relationship between the networks and local affiliates.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | September 22, 2005
Robert L. Johnson, the Black Entertainment Television co-founder whose leading role in building a Baltimore convention hotel has become uncertain, is buying the new Marriott Residence Inn downtown, Baltimore Development Corp. officials said yesterday. The 188-unit hotel, at Light and Redwood streets, is owned by Bethesda developer Urgo Hotels and opened its doors in July. It is about four blocks northeast of the Baltimore Convention Center. "It's a good thing," said M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the BDC. "It's more investment in the city."
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2005
Every epic struggle has its chronicler, whether in verse or image. The Trojan War had Homer; the American Civil War, Mathew Brady. And the World Series of Poker has Bob Chesterman, who, as coordinating producer, has helped record ESPN's coverage of the Las Vegas poker championship the past three years. While TV poker is ubiquitous across the dial, it's the poker World Series telecasts that have become the most recognizable and familiar showcase for the game. Over the course of ESPN's poker shows, audiences have been introduced to a cast of stoic pros, antagonistic foils, and the occasional Everyman who hits the jackpot.
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