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By JEFF COHEN | May 4, 1997
In a May 4 article in the Perspective section on political lobbying by the broadcast industry, a quote from Reed Hundt, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, was incorrectly attributed to Bob Dole. Hundt called the government's distribution of the new digital broadcast spectrum "the biggest single gift of public property to any industry in this century."Pub Date: 5/13/97The news you are about to read is news you may never see on television. nn nnIt's about an industry that has long had unrivaled clout on Capitol Hill, an industry that receives billions in corporate welfare, an industry whose gifts to - and influence over - Washington politicians dwarf the lavishly scrutinized Chinese or Indonesian efforts.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | January 14, 2014
How much longer can Hollywood claim to be the movie capital of the world? Can the California legislature reverse the slide of film production away from Los Angeles simply by enhancing tax credits for the movie and TV industry or, one day, will the Oscars be presented in Atlanta or Toronto or New Orleans? Such questions grow more pertinent year by year. Lawmakers in Sacramento are even now mulling over a plan that would extend the current $100 million movie industry tax credit program that is set to terminate on July 1, 2017.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 21, 1996
If ABC, NBC and CBS follow Fox's lead in coming days and promise to impose a ratings system for sex and violence on their programs, the word "historic" will be sounded often and loudly from Washington to Hollywood. After all, the networks have resisted calls for a ratings system for more than 25 years.But such self-regulation by the networks may simply be a bad rerun of the movie industry's evasive tactics rather than a watershed development, say media scholars. In their analysis, the proposed ratings system -- which will be modeled on one instituted in 1968 by the Motion Picture Association of America -- is mainly an attempt by the networks to dodge government regulation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
After four tough years, these are heady days in the world of Maryland TV and film production. Last month, "Game Change," the Baltimore-made HBO docudrama on the 2008 presidential election, premiered to strong reviews and even stronger debate. This week, "House of Cards," the $100 million Netflix political drama starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, starts filming after three months and millions of dollars spent in pre-production on sets in Harford County and Baltimore. And next Sunday, "VEEP," starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus and filmed in Columbia, debuts on HBO. But all the jobs, money and excitement that Hollywood has brought to Maryland during the last year in could soon disappear amid all the finger-pointing and blame-gaming over the budget impasse in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On the eve of the first hearing on the television industry's voluntary age-based ratings, congressional critics moved yesterday to effectively require a system that shields children from programs that depict violence."
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 1997
NEW YORK -- Dissatisfied with the television industry's age-based ratings system, several members of Congress intend to introduce legislation that would effectively force the TV networks to provide content-based TV ratings.Sen. Ernest Hollings, D-S.C., planned to introduce a new "safe harbor" bill in the Senate today that would require the television industry -- which includes the major networks, cable stations and syndicators of programs -- to either label shows for violence or move them to "safe harbor" hours when children are less likely to be watching.
FEATURES
By Pat Karlak and Pat Karlak,Los Angeles Daily News | July 24, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- The industrywide conference on television violence and its impact on children and crime is triggering controversy even before it opens next month.Missy Zeitsoff, a former Malibu, Calif., city councilwoman whose son was slain last year, is criticizing organizers for failing to provide opportunities for members of the viewing public and crime victims groups to speak at the Aug. 2 conference in Beverly Hills, Calif., which is being financed by the television industry."The TV industry is so sensitive to being censored in their programming, yet they're willing to censor public comment," said Ms. Zeitsoff, whose son, Justin, 17, was shot by two men in what prosecutors contended was a soured illegal-gun deal.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 1996
The majority of programs on television contain violence that is "psychologically harmful," according to a year-long study sponsored by the cable industry and released yesterday.While those findings are not new, an industry-funded study has never condemned television violence in such strong terms. And they come on the eve of a new initiative in Washington to limit the exposure of children to television violence through the use of blocking devices called v-chips.The study "simply confirm(s)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The three major television networks, after years of criticism that they glamorize violence, appear to be ready to clean up their act.In an unusual joint letter sent by ABC, NBC and CBS to Sen. Paul Simon, D-Ill., who has pushed hard for legislation to curb television violence, the three networks have agreed to issue a uniform set of guidelines for depiction of violence on the air.Although those guidelines are not expected to be notably different from the standards already in place at each network, the agreement is significant because it pressures others in the television industry, including cable TV and the burgeoning syndication market, to take similar steps.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 16, 1997
Under pressure from the White House, the television industry is expected to announce this week that it will revise its controversial age-based ratings system to include information on language, sex and violence.The announcement will most likely be made at a White House meeting late this week or early next week depending on President Clinton's schedule, according to industry sources.The ratings system, which was designed by Hollywood lobbyist Jack Valenti, has been under fire from parents' groups, educators and members of Congress since its introduction in January.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 1, 2007
My thoughts on a few things that, by themselves, won't make a complete column but will do nicely when combined: First of all: what Hollywood writers' strike? Hollywood writers have been on strike how many days now? Does anybody really miss 'em? There are only three shows that I give a darn about. One is 24, the action-thriller starring Kiefer Sutherland. I'm still hooked on the series, even though last season smacked suspiciously of a recycled product. The second is the bad-cop/worse-cop series The Shield.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In the face of a lobbying blitzkrieg by the cable television industry, the head of the Federal Communications Commission said yesterday evening that he had scaled back his proposal to more tightly regulate the industry to salvage the effort. The chairman, Kevin J. Martin, and some consumer groups said the agreement could help to make programming more diverse and ultimately reduce cable costs. The compromise was a significant, though not total, victory for the cable industry, whose executives and lobbyists had worked to erode support on the commission for Martin's agenda.
FEATURES
By Martin Miller and Martin Miller,Los AngelesTimes | July 5, 2007
"Pulled Indefinitely." "Off the Schedule." "Permanent Hiatus." These could easily be titles for a new slate of fall sitcoms and dramas. Instead they are the most common euphemisms employed by networks when they talk about the dying elephant in the screening room - the uncomfortable truth that somebody's favorite television show is being canceled. It's a sad fact of life and prime-time television, where a show can last a few episodes (like last season's crime drama Smith) or 11 seasons (like the comedy Cheers)
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | August 10, 2006
A few weeks ago, a friend had a cable jack installed in his bedroom, then slowly went bananas trying to get his TV to work properly. No matter what he tried, it would always skip some channels. Naturally, he blamed the cable company, which responded by dispatching a young technician to check out the signal and the new wall jack. Nothing wrong with either one. Then the lad had an inspiration: He pressed the setup button on the remote control, inspected an on-screen menu and pronounced the problem solved.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 5, 2006
Weeks before the fall TV season officially begins, television networks are abandoning five decades of tradition in hopes of attracting younger audiences. Beginning today, two of NBC's most eagerly anticipated new dramas, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip and Kidnapped, will begin arriving in the mailboxes of Net-flix subscribers who have signed up for an advance glimpse of the series. Early next month, NBC's action drama Heroes will be available for downloading on iTunes - weeks before the show's on-air debut.
BUSINESS
By Meg James and Meg James,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2005
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - In the eyes of the television industry, Charlie Flint is the enemy. His Beverly Hills apartment has not one but two TiVo digital video recorders. Flint records television shows - even when he and his wife are at home - so that when they watch them later, they can skip commercials. He persuaded his parents to buy their own digital video recorder, or DVR, so his sports-fan father could instantly review any play he wanted. "Once you've used one, you can't imagine life without TiVo," said Flint, 36, a project manager for a company that builds Web sites.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 1996
The television ratings system being hashed out by industry executives is likely to have five or six categories, similar to those for big-screen movies, according to a published report.Although no final decisions have been made, sources told the Los Angeles Times that the ratings are likely to be G for general audiences and a handful of PG derivatives, which will suggest suitable viewing age. For example, some shows would have a PG-8, representing a show that may be inappropriate for kids under 8.Most programs are expected to be rated either G or PG. Shows such as ABC's "NYPD Blue" and "Walker, Texas Ranger," would get a PG-13 rating, according to the Times.
FEATURES
By N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 1997
If you believe Nielsen Media Research Co., February was a month when a lot of people quit the television-viewing habit.According to Nielsen figures, the average number of American households watching prime-time television on all channels fell by more than 1 million in February, a precipitous drop that will surely be cited by the growing number of combatants in what the Intel chairman, Andy Grove, has labeled the coming "war for eyeballs" in the American home.It...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 5, 2004
The fallout from the Janet Jackson-Justin Timberlake Super Bowl fiasco continued yesterday as NBC executives decided to delete a scene depicting an elderly female patient's breast from tonight's episode of the hit drama ER. The decision was made in the face of growing pressure from the network's local affiliates. The National Football League, meanwhile, canceled a half-time performance by JC Chasez, a member of Timberlake's band, scheduled to air Sunday on ESPN's Pro Bowl. "We thought it was over the top," Brian McCarthy, an NFL spokesman said of the performance, which included Chasez singing "Blowin' Me Up (With Her Love)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 21, 2003
How many comedians does it take to emcee an awards show? Eleven, it seems -- at least on The 55th Annual Emmy Awards telecast, which airs tonight. The lineup: Ellen DeGeneres, Brad Garrett, George Lopez, Bernie Mac, Dennis Miller, Conan O'Brien, Garry Shandling, Martin Short, Jon Stewart, Wanda Sykes and Darrell Hammond. Gone are the days in which Johnny Carson or Bob Hope possessed more than enough talent to serve as host -- note the singular noun -- for the Emmy or Oscar telecasts. Some might see tonight's lineup as an industry's response to the growing fragmentation of its audience.
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