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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
Don Scott was anchoring the noon news from a rain-swept street corner when a truck ran over a power cord and left only his voice on the air. Marianne Bannister and Rod Daniels anchored the 6 p.m. news from a makeshift set the color of Aqua-Velva. Kai Jackson and Sally Thorner did the 5 p.m. news from the studios of competitors.That's how Baltimore's TV news looked yesterday, as personnel at WBAL, Channel 11, and WJZ, Channel 13, soldiered on with 12 tons of metal dangling precariously above their studios.
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By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Hill Harper is perhaps best known for his characters on television shows such as “CSI: NY” and the cable series “Covert Affairs.” Yet the actor came to Baltimore to tackle a different role: working to help incarcerated individuals across the country - particularly young African-American men.   "To me, this is the issue of our time," said Harper ,who spent Sunday speaking at two city churches - Bethel AME and Empowerment Temple AME -...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2005
Edward A. Russell Jr., a Television Hill stalwart whose ready smile cheered WBAL colleagues for more than half a century, died of cancer Tuesday at Joseph Richey Hospice -- little more than two weeks after his retirement as reproduction manager for the radio and TV stations. The Lochearn resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Rutland Avenue, he was a 1951 graduate of Dunbar High School and attended Loyola College. Mr. Russell was hired in 1952 as a $35-a-week mail clerk at WBAL, when its studios were at Charles and 26th streets.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 18, 2011
Glenn H. Lahman, a pioneering television broadcast chief engineer who never lost his affection for old tube radios, died of cancer Oct. 10 at his Annapolis home. He was 86. Born in Bucyrus, Ohio, he left a farming community for the Valparaiso, Ind., Technical Institute, an engineering school. He then joined the Army and served in Europe during World War II. He landed at Normandy in July 1944 while in the Second Armored Division and later fought in the Battle of the Bulge. In later years, Mr. Lahman wore his original master sergeant uniform in the St. Patrick's Day Parade and in the Annapolis Memorial Day Parade.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 18, 2011
Glenn H. Lahman, a pioneering television broadcast chief engineer who never lost his affection for old tube radios, died of cancer Oct. 10 at his Annapolis home. He was 86. Born in Bucyrus, Ohio, he left a farming community for the Valparaiso, Ind., Technical Institute, an engineering school. He then joined the Army and served in Europe during World War II. He landed at Normandy in July 1944 while in the Second Armored Division and later fought in the Battle of the Bulge. In later years, Mr. Lahman wore his original master sergeant uniform in the St. Patrick's Day Parade and in the Annapolis Memorial Day Parade.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Hill Harper is perhaps best known for his characters on television shows such as “CSI: NY” and the cable series “Covert Affairs.” Yet the actor came to Baltimore to tackle a different role: working to help incarcerated individuals across the country - particularly young African-American men.   "To me, this is the issue of our time," said Harper ,who spent Sunday speaking at two city churches - Bethel AME and Empowerment Temple AME -...
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1997
The candelabra-like tower atop Television Hill has been a Baltimore landmark for nearly 40 years.Soaring 1,319 feet into the Northwest Baltimore sky, 730 feet above the high ground of Television Hill, and visible from almost any location in the metropolitan area, the transmission tower has been broadcasting the signals of stations WJZ-TV, WBAL-TV and WMAR-TV since August 1959.From its heights, there are spectacular views of the surrounding city and counties as well as the Chesapeake Bay and the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
April 3, 1998
THE 1968 riots rank with the 1904 fire that wiped out much of the downtown business district and the state legislature's 1947 vote to prevent the city from annexing additional land as major events that changed the course of history for Baltimore this century.In the early hours, the unrest didn't seem like a momentous event. The city was relatively quiet after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on the evening of #F Thursday, April 4. But by April 6, sporadic, isolated incidents had gained momentum.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 11, 1998
"Tell me your diamonds."This is one of many memorable lines in "Beloved," the film adapted from Toni Morrison's book that opens in theaters on Friday. The title character, a strange, otherworldly girl, is asking her mother, played by Oprah Winfrey, to tell the story of a long-lost pair of shiny crystal earrings.But when Winfrey - who has spent 10 years bringing Morrison's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to the screen - recently met with the press in Chicago, she was not wearing crystal. She was wearing very real, very big diamonds that dangled voluptuously from her ears.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | August 8, 1992
So you're a producer of the early morning news program on Channel 13 and you're waiting for Anita Nall to show up at your station for an exclusive interview.You look up at a TV monitoring the competition, and there is Baltimore's Olympic heroine being interviewed on Channel 11 -- live -- just a few hundred yards away down Television Hill!When the staff at WJZ saw their star on WBAL yesterday, they reacted immediately."They dispatched an envoy who politely reminded us where we were supposed to be in the first place, up at Channel 13 being interviewed by Marty Bass," said John Nall, Anita's father.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2005
Edward A. Russell Jr., a Television Hill stalwart whose ready smile cheered WBAL colleagues for more than half a century, died of cancer Tuesday at Joseph Richey Hospice -- little more than two weeks after his retirement as reproduction manager for the radio and TV stations. The Lochearn resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Rutland Avenue, he was a 1951 graduate of Dunbar High School and attended Loyola College. Mr. Russell was hired in 1952 as a $35-a-week mail clerk at WBAL, when its studios were at Charles and 26th streets.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
Don Scott was anchoring the noon news from a rain-swept street corner when a truck ran over a power cord and left only his voice on the air. Marianne Bannister and Rod Daniels anchored the 6 p.m. news from a makeshift set the color of Aqua-Velva. Kai Jackson and Sally Thorner did the 5 p.m. news from the studios of competitors.That's how Baltimore's TV news looked yesterday, as personnel at WBAL, Channel 11, and WJZ, Channel 13, soldiered on with 12 tons of metal dangling precariously above their studios.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1997
The candelabra-like tower atop Television Hill has been a Baltimore landmark for nearly 40 years.Soaring 1,319 feet into the Northwest Baltimore sky, 730 feet above the high ground of Television Hill, and visible from almost any location in the metropolitan area, the transmission tower has been broadcasting the signals of stations WJZ-TV, WBAL-TV and WMAR-TV since August 1959.From its heights, there are spectacular views of the surrounding city and counties as well as the Chesapeake Bay and the Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik | November 27, 2003
The November ratings period that helps to set advertising rates is all but complete. And both of the Titans of Television Hill are busy bragging. For the "sweeps" period ending tonight, WBAL-TV seems highly likely to take top ratings for its 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. newscasts, and for the 11 p.m. news programs on Monday through Friday. The NBC affiliate also has the highest-rated weekend morning shows as of the figures available early yesterday morning. Yet it is possible that WJZ, a CBS station with the No. 1 prime-time lineup in the market, will snare highest ratings for the 11 p.m. newscasts when the full week is considered.
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