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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | October 10, 2006
A health care union supporting Mayor Martin O'Malley is launching two television commercials today as part of its $1 million effort to help the Democrat's election campaign against Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The TV commercials, in addition to three radio spots already airing, are being paid for by 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East for broadcast in the Baltimore and Washington markets. Two radio ads and one television commercial attack Ehrlich's health care policies by highlighting his opposition to state legislation passed this year that attempted to force Wal-Mart to pay more for employee health care.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | October 8, 2012
A group opposing same-sex marriage in Maryland began airing television commercials Monday morning that say children reared by their biological parents are best off. The Maryland Marriage Alliance, which paid for the ad, has yet to provide supporting material for that claim. We will add to this post when they do. The commercial is very similar to an anti-same-sex marriage ad that debuted recently in Minnesota. Both ads stress that the institution of marriage has been around for a long time, that marriage is about "more than what adults want for themselves" and make the claim that "children do best when raised by their married mom and dad. " The Maryland ad includes an interesting disclaimer that does not appear in the Minnesota spots: It allows that divorce and death also contribute to situations where children are raised outside of a nuclear family.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | October 8, 2012
A group opposing same-sex marriage in Maryland began airing television commercials Monday morning that say children reared by their biological parents are best off. The Maryland Marriage Alliance, which paid for the ad, has yet to provide supporting material for that claim. We will add to this post when they do. The commercial is very similar to an anti-same-sex marriage ad that debuted recently in Minnesota. Both ads stress that the institution of marriage has been around for a long time, that marriage is about "more than what adults want for themselves" and make the claim that "children do best when raised by their married mom and dad. " The Maryland ad includes an interesting disclaimer that does not appear in the Minnesota spots: It allows that divorce and death also contribute to situations where children are raised outside of a nuclear family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Robert Lee "Bob" Bell, who began his career in auto sales in the 1950s and went on to own the Bob Bell Automotive Group, one of the state's largest car dealers, died Sunday of leukemia at theUniversity of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident, who earlier had lived in Laurel, was 78. Born and raised in Alexandria, Va., Mr. Bell was appointed a Capitol Hill U.S. Senate page and graduated from the Senate Page School. "He was a page for Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn," said a daughter, Mary Catherine Bishop of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1994
Democratic challengers Susan B. Gray and Sue-Ellen Hantman continue to scramble for financial crumbs while County Executive Charles I. Ecker feasts on fund-raising riches, election board records show.During the most recent reporting period -- Aug. 10 to Aug. 28 -- the Republican incumbent raised what for him was a paltry $910 in cash. That sum, added to $3,360 in in-kind contributions, brought his total for the 19-day period to $4,270. Reports for the most recent period were due Friday.Mr.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 3, 1993
Oh, that Stephen L. Miles, he's a winger and a dinger, ain't he?Also, not to be overlooked, he is one very brilliant man in certain obvious ways. For instance, Stephen L. (the ''L'' stands for ''Laughing All the Way to the Bank'') now says he might want to be the next attorney general of Maryland. He says this only slightly less than two years before we're even having an election for the office, but never mind.Before this, he was busy in other ways. He said he might want to be the owner of the Baltimore Orioles the last time Eli Jacobs hinted he might want to sell.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | November 1, 1994
As next week's general election draws closer, the two candidates for Congress in the 2nd District are waging a war of television commercials -- fueled by growing war chests.Through Oct. 19, the cutoff date for the latest reports, Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. raised $133,197 -- nearly $85,000 more than his Democratic opponent, Gerry L. Brewster, who raised $48,263.The big money seems to be flowing more easily to Mr. Ehrlich now than to Mr. Brewster. He collected three times as much political action committee money as Mr. Brewster during the last reporting period.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
One of the most accomplished directors of television commercials ever, Joe Pytka would rarely seem at a loss for how to make one. He has created thousands of TV ads, from Pepsi and McDonald's spots to the famed "This Is Your Brain on Drugs" series. His portfolio includes more than 30 Super Bowl commercials and the 1996 Warner Bros. cartoon movie Space Jam. His fee is $15,000 a day. But when presented last spring with a concept for a Gatorade commercial depicting Michael Jordan playing basketball against a younger version of himself - to air during Super Bowl XXXVII on Sunday - Pytka was uncertain he could pull it off. "It was almost like an impossible project.
NEWS
By J. Herbert Altschull | December 4, 1991
COPIOUS tears are shed over the influence of Big Money in the American political process. You've got to be a millionaire to get elected, it is said, and it's nearly impossible for challengers to campaign successfully against entrenched, moneyed incumbents."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 27, 2003
THERE IS a breaking point in all human beings at which they can no longer stand the sight of the AFLAC duck, or the Sprint guy in the black raincoat, or Brian Henderson of 12 Maple Lane tossing Bud Light bottles into the sea with his precious be-my-pen-pal notes. There is a point at which the brain begins to recoil at the 200th viewing of Fran Drescher's goofy winks in those Old Navy painters' jeans spots. There is a point at which one no longer cares to "ask your doctor about Levitra," because seeing that aging jock throw the football through the tire over and over and over again has sapped one's will to live.
NEWS
December 11, 2010
Granted, it is not the most important piece of legislation ever to come out of Washington. But when President Barack Obama signs the CALM Act, probably sometime this month, I will give a muted cheer. The Commercial Advertising Loudness Mitigation Act is the latest effort to stop the shouting on television commercials. This is something that the best minds in our nation's capital have been wrestling with for decades. While it seemed obvious to me and the rest of the viewing public that the car dealer screaming "Come on down!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
Even in the mashed-up world of TV these days, it is a little jarring in the middle of a Baltimore Ravens game or "Late Night With David Letterman" to suddenly see the screen fill with images of Martin O'Malley and Bob Ehrlich talking about a 72 percent energy rate hike that they were fighting about in 2006, during the last governor's campaign. In fact, when their ads run back to back during a commercial break, it is almost surreal — as if their video images are locked in a TV time warp, a kind of candidates' (and viewers')
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
John Raymond "Ray" Gaeng, a retired advertising executive who gained fame in the late 1980s as a Ford pitchman, died July 18 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at his Bel Air home. He was 81. Mr. Gaeng, the son of a Baltimore police sergeant and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Normal Avenue. After graduating in 1946 from Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington, he studied acting on a scholarship at the Studio of Dramatic Arts at the New York School of the Theater in New York City.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Mark Helman, the founder of Bill's Carpet Fair who appeared in scores of zany television commercials and was a donor to many charities, died of leukemia July 12 at his Pikesville home. He was 80. Born Morris Helman in Philadelphia, he graduated from Olney High School in 1948. He moved to Baltimore and became a "tin man," a salesman for Air-Tite aluminum windows, doors and siding. When he learned that carpet weavers were selling 12-foot-wide lengths at prices middle-class buyers could afford, he embraced wall-to-wall carpet sales.
BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2007
The ad industry is redefining "public" television. With people fast-forwarding faster than ever through TV commercials at home, advertising companies have taken their campaigns into the open. Perhaps you've noticed: Flat-panel screens filled with ads plugging cars, orthodontists and face-lifts are everywhere. They greet you at the grocery store, bank and service station. Most recently they've popped up in restrooms, mounted on hand dryers. And no, you can't change the channel. "Consumers want control," said Eli Portnoy, founder of the Portnoy Group, a brand strategy consultant.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 12, 2007
Patricia L. Geritz, an administrative assistant who danced with the Chanticleer Lovelies as a young woman, died Feb. 4 of complications from bowel surgery at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 74. Born Patricia Lilly, she was raised in Homeland and attended Notre Dame Preparatory School from kindergarten until she graduated from high school in 1950. She would walk the mile from her home to the school's former location at what is now the College of Notre Dame of Maryland campus.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 11, 2011
Robert L. "Bob" Bell, who began his career in auto sales in the 1950s which later grew into the Bob Bell Automotive Group, died Sunday of leukemia at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 78. Mr. Bell was best known for his appearances in TV ads for his dealerships dressed in a pink tuxedo and playing a piano. A University of Virginia graduate and a Korean War veteran, Mr. Bell went to work selling cars for the Ford Motor Co. in 1956. He opened his own agency, Academy Ford, in Laurel in 1963.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | October 10, 2006
A health care union supporting Mayor Martin O'Malley is launching two television commercials today as part of its $1 million effort to help the Democrat's election campaign against Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The TV commercials, in addition to three radio spots already airing, are being paid for by 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East for broadcast in the Baltimore and Washington markets. Two radio ads and one television commercial attack Ehrlich's health care policies by highlighting his opposition to state legislation passed this year that attempted to force Wal-Mart to pay more for employee health care.
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