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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 1, 2004
Boohbah. A sneeze? A new Winnie-the-Pooh character? Neither. But those two silly-sounding syllables just may form one of the most important new words learned this year by parents of preschool children. Boohbah is the newest variation in television fare for kids. Created by Anne Wood, the controversial mastermind behind the phenomenally successful television show Teletubbies, the new PBS program is available in 99 million homes. Remember Teletubbies? It's the show criticized because it featured fuzzy little creatures with TV sets inserted into their stomachs.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 1, 2004
Boohbah. A sneeze? A new Winnie-the-Pooh character? Neither. But those two silly-sounding syllables just may form one of the most important new words learned this year by parents of preschool children. Boohbah is the newest variation in television fare for kids. Created by Anne Wood, the controversial mastermind behind the phenomenally successful television show Teletubbies, the new PBS program is available in 99 million homes. Remember Teletubbies? It's the show criticized because it featured fuzzy little creatures with TV sets inserted into their stomachs.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
Tinky Winky, the oldest and biggest of TV's psychedelic quartet of Teletubby children's characters, is purple. He's got a triangle-shaped antenna sticking out of his head. He carries a "magic bag," which looks suspiciously like a purse.And the Rev. Jerry Falwell can't get the prancing baby-show superstar out of his head.In the February edition of his National Liberty Journal, Falwell has published "Parents Alert: Tinky Winky Comes Out of the Closet," in which he interprets the Teletubby's purpleness (the gay pride color)
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2001
MARCH 20 WAS a big day for the preschoolers at Rhymes and Reasons Day Care Center in Eldersburg. The group took a school bus to Maryland Public Television studios in Owings Mills early that morning to participate in the filming of "Teletubbies Get Up and Go! First Annual Exercise Day." The program is part of an initiative to fight childhood obesity and promote health and fitness, according to promoter Tina Waganer of itsy bitsy Entertainment Co., which markets the popular children's show "Teletubbies."
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
NEW YORK -- It takes less than 15 minutes for the Teletubbies to become irredeemably irritating in their U.S. debut. The four little antennaed fur balls run around, a windmill turns and suddenly a video clip of a girl and her horse is playing on their tummies. Just when you can't take any more of the horse scenes, when the adult mind begs for mercy or sleep, the clip ends.But not for long. "Again! Again!" the Teletubbies cry. And the clip rolls again."Teletubbies," a British phenomenon so mind-numbing that the UK's education minister has condemned it, debuts on PBS tomorrow.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 6, 1998
The four little, roly-poly toddlers with the ET faces are standing in their underground bomb shelter of a home when suddenly what looks like a periscope rises up out of the floor."
NEWS
April 9, 1998
THE SHOW has been controversial from the start. Many rightly question whether children so young should be watching it. With a cast of pint-sized characters, the show -- strangely, but perhaps predictably -- has become a cult hit among age groups for which it was never intended.We're referring to "Teletubbies," the British show imported by U.S. public television for toddlers but also rated as a favorite among college students overseas.Or, we could be describing "South Park," the profane nighttime cartoon on cable TV about a group of kids, one of whom dies weekly.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It's official. The moral majority is dead. That's the word from Paul Weyrich, the conservative broadcaster who first suggested that televangelist Jerry Falwell name his famous political organization "Moral Majority."Those were happier days for Mr. Weyrich, who is president of the Free Congress Foundation. Now, in an open letter to conservatives in the wake of President Clinton's acquittal, Mr. Weyrich is raising the surrender flag."I believe that we probably have lost the culture war," he writes in a letter posted on his organization's Web page, and he no longer believes "there is a moral majority."
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2001
MARCH 20 WAS a big day for the preschoolers at Rhymes and Reasons Day Care Center in Eldersburg. The group took a school bus to Maryland Public Television studios in Owings Mills early that morning to participate in the filming of "Teletubbies Get Up and Go! First Annual Exercise Day." The program is part of an initiative to fight childhood obesity and promote health and fitness, according to promoter Tina Waganer of itsy bitsy Entertainment Co., which markets the popular children's show "Teletubbies."
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
You know the holiday season is here when a voice from inside Christopher Byrne's luggage loudly pleads: "Mommy, I want milk."That happened recently at a LaGuardia Airport ticket counter. No big deal though. It was just Amazing Amy, the talking doll."People look at you funny, but, hey, it's the best-selling doll in the country right now," said Byrne.Byrne, a 20-year veteran of the toy business, is editor of Playthings Market Watch, a Manhattan-based industry newsletter. His job is to keep track of toy trends, including knowing what will be the holiday's best sellers.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 29, 1999
THE U.S. presidential election is a scant 14 months away, and you can feel the excitement building across the nation, all the way from Washington, D.C., to the immediate suburbs of Washington, D.C.For the benefit of those of you normal civilian humans who live outside Wingtip World and do not plan to start caring about this election for at least another year, here's a rundown of recent developments:On the Republican side, the big summer news event was...
NEWS
August 11, 1999
MOST PARENTS realize that watching television is not the most healthy activity for their children. But the American Academy of Pediatrics may have startled them nonetheless with its recent recommendation that children under age 2 watch no television at all.The organization also recommended that parents keep logs for their pediatricians of the nature and amount of programming their older children watch.Scientific evidence to support the claims was scant, and the warning may be overblown. But the exaggeration helped make the point: Children need mental and physical activity, and watching television is the epitome of passivity.
TOPIC
By Elizabeth Schuett | March 7, 1999
WHEN IT comes to the news of the day, I confess I am a victim of lowered expectations and sorely in need of an attitude adjustment.Every morning, I unfurl the daily blab foolishly hoping for some good news. Maybe a headline proclaiming "Peace in the Middle East" or maybe even a cure for the common cold.Warily, I scan page one for assurance that Bill Clinton made it through the night without being accused of assaulting the entire soprano section of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.More and more, I find myself responding to the news with comments such as "Lord, help us" and "Who cares?"
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It's official. The moral majority is dead. That's the word from Paul Weyrich, the conservative broadcaster who first suggested that televangelist Jerry Falwell name his famous political organization "Moral Majority."Those were happier days for Mr. Weyrich, who is president of the Free Congress Foundation. Now, in an open letter to conservatives in the wake of President Clinton's acquittal, Mr. Weyrich is raising the surrender flag."I believe that we probably have lost the culture war," he writes in a letter posted on his organization's Web page, and he no longer believes "there is a moral majority."
NEWS
February 12, 1999
THE REV. Jerry Falwell is crazy -- or crazy like a fox -- for denouncing a character on the preschooler's "Teletubbies" television show as a sinister symbol of homosexuality.Mr. Falwell's foolish, homophobic statements don't normally garner headlines. But when the fundamentalist preacher and founder of the Moral Majority criticizes the sexuality of an androgynous make-believe character on a hit public-television series, his denunciation makes news. He issued a "Parent Alert" in this month's issue of the National Liberty Journal, a magazine he publishes that is also available on the Internet.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
Tinky Winky, the oldest and biggest of TV's psychedelic quartet of Teletubby children's characters, is purple. He's got a triangle-shaped antenna sticking out of his head. He carries a "magic bag," which looks suspiciously like a purse.And the Rev. Jerry Falwell can't get the prancing baby-show superstar out of his head.In the February edition of his National Liberty Journal, Falwell has published "Parents Alert: Tinky Winky Comes Out of the Closet," in which he interprets the Teletubby's purpleness (the gay pride color)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
This year it's Furby and Teletubbies -- and retailers can't stock the popular toys fast enough.But whether or not such best-sellers will give the toy industry a much-needed boost remains unclear at the crucial end of a year in which sales are expected to creep up a modest 1 percent and no single, hot new toy appears poised to sweep the nation.Many retailers are finding a need to generate their own excitement -- especially as toy retailing becomes more and more fragmented. Some are offering exclusive toy packages; others are distancing themselves from the mass market by stressing educational toys or one-on-one service.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 29, 1999
THE U.S. presidential election is a scant 14 months away, and you can feel the excitement building across the nation, all the way from Washington, D.C., to the immediate suburbs of Washington, D.C.For the benefit of those of you normal civilian humans who live outside Wingtip World and do not plan to start caring about this election for at least another year, here's a rundown of recent developments:On the Republican side, the big summer news event was...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
This year it's Furby and Teletubbies -- and retailers can't stock the popular toys fast enough.But whether or not such best-sellers will give the toy industry a much-needed boost remains unclear at the crucial end of a year in which sales are expected to creep up a modest 1 percent and no single, hot new toy appears poised to sweep the nation.Many retailers are finding a need to generate their own excitement -- especially as toy retailing becomes more and more fragmented. Some are offering exclusive toy packages; others are distancing themselves from the mass market by stressing educational toys or one-on-one service.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
You know the holiday season is here when a voice from inside Christopher Byrne's luggage loudly pleads: "Mommy, I want milk."That happened recently at a LaGuardia Airport ticket counter. No big deal though. It was just Amazing Amy, the talking doll."People look at you funny, but, hey, it's the best-selling doll in the country right now," said Byrne.Byrne, a 20-year veteran of the toy business, is editor of Playthings Market Watch, a Manhattan-based industry newsletter. His job is to keep track of toy trends, including knowing what will be the holiday's best sellers.
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