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March 3, 1994
A $2,000 telescope, powerful enough to enable the viewer to observe mountain ranges and shadows on the moon, was stolen from the enclosed back porch of a Linwood home Sunday night.Richard J. King, who received the the electric clock-drive telescope as a Christmas present in 1991, said it was mounted on a self-leveling sealed tripod.Mr. King said the Meade Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope has an 8-inch reflector that brings Jupiter, the largest planet of the solar system and the fifth in distance from the sun, into view at the size of a quarter.
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By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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NEWS
April 6, 2002
A month after undergoing the most sweeping tune-up in its 12-year history, the Hubble Space Telescope has been given a clean bill of health by NASA scientists. Preliminary tests showed that extensive new hardware installed by astronauts last month in a series of five grueling spacewalks appears to be working flawlessly. The centerpiece of last month's mission was a new electrical system and a state-of-the art camera that promises a tenfold improvement in the $2 billion telescope's ability to find distant objects.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists are building a telescope meant to look at space in a way no one has before, hoping to probe the blackness between planets, stars and galaxies, into deep time and the mystery of how it all began. For decades, scientists have used telescopes to plumb the origins of the universe, but have not applied the scale or precision of the project that will use a four-telescope array called the Cosmology Large-Angular Scale Surveyor, or CLASS, being built now at the university's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2000
STUDENTS AT Glenelg Country School soon will be able to take a close look at stars and other celestial wonders. Thanks to a gift from the Gould family, the school is the owner of one of the most powerful telescopes in Maryland. Plans have been made to use the telescope as the focal point for a comprehensive astronomy curriculum from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. The telescope was presented Saturday during a Chinese New Year celebration at the school. The crowd of 175 people included current and former faculty, trustees, headmasters and founders of the school -- people who had played a major role in the growth of the school during its 46-year history.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1998
The starlings have been evicted, and the Maryland Science Center's long-neglected rooftop observatory in Baltimore is once again providing dramatic views of whatever stars and planets manage to shine through the city's nighttime glare."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 1999
MOUNT MAUNA KEA, Hawaii -- In a mountaintop ceremony bringing together a Japanese princess and members of the Hawaiian royal order wearing crimson robes, Japan inaugurated on Friday what many astronomers expect will soon prove to be the world's most powerful land-based telescope. Experts who gathered under a dazzling sun at the 13,796-foot summit of Mount Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest mountain, said the 26.9-foot instrument, known by the Japanese name for the constellation Pleiades, or Subaru, would help propel Japan from astronomical obscurity into the highest echelons of space-observing nations.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
WASHINGTON - A powerful new telescope technology is allowing astronomers to produce celestial images from the ground that are as sharp as those snapped by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Called adaptive optics, the new technology cancels out distortions caused by turbulence in Earth's atmosphere by changing the shape of the telescope's flexible mirror more than 1,000 times per second. With a growing number of big mountaintop telescopes now fitted with adaptive optics, scientists say, there should be an acceleration in the search for knowledge about the formation of planetary systems like ours and for evidence that life has evolved around other stars.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Dennis O'Brien and Frank D. Roylance and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2004
At the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, the messages of sympathy have been pouring in for days. No one has died, exactly. But NASA's decision last week to cancel the fifth and final space shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope has doomed the revered orbiting observatory to an early demise. And that has triggered real grief among astronomers stricken by the loss of future scientific discoveries, the derailing of their scientific quests and perhaps their jobs. "We have people who are emotionally all over the place," said John MacKenty, 46, the institute's group leader for one of two new Hubble instruments grounded by the decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
The trouble with cheap amateur telescopes is that you can't see much through them. Expensive telescopes really do bring the heavens into your back yard. But they're, well, really expensive. Mike Paolucci is betting that frustrated stargazers will spend $50 a year for access to a telescope bigger and better than anything they could ever hope to buy. Especially if it came with a guide, and they never had to stand in the cold to use it. Paolucci, 33, a self-described "serial entrepreneur" based in New York City, is preparing for a Christmas Day launch of Slooh.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center last month, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and space agency Administrator Charles Bolden stressed the importance of maintaining budget support for the James Webb Space Telescope, keeping it on track for a 2018 launch. Sticking to that schedule is the job of the Webb telescope's project manager, Bill Ochs, who, from his office on the Greenbelt campus, oversees all of the moving parts slated to come together and be blasted into space in 41/2 years. It's a complicated job, Ochs acknowledged, but since new development and spending plans were approved three years ago for the delayed and over-budget project, things have been running smoothly.
NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Stephanie Todd, 8, smiled broadly as she talked about the pink telescope that sits in her home. But she's even more excited about the opportunity to look through a telescope that has some history. "The first thing I'm going to look for is [the constellation] Orion," she said, "which is the kind of star that I see outside, and is always so noticeable. " If everything goes as planned for the Howard Astronomical League, Stephanie will be gazing at Orion through the Paul Watson telescope - a device built by a renowned Johns Hopkins University professor that will be the main attraction at Howard County's new observatory.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Learn more about Comet ISON and other visitors to the solar system from the experts who study it right in our backyard. The Space Telescope Science Institute is holding a monthly lecture Tuesday, this time from astrophysicist Frank Summers, titled “Great Comets from Humble Origins & Eyes on ISON.” You can also get a chance to peer into the heavens from the institute's observatory. The event is free and starts at 8 p.m. in the institute's auditorium at 3700 San Martin Drive.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
EDITOR'S NOTE: What follows is a text-only version of this Hidden Maryland story. To view the full feature version, which includes photos, video and graphics, go here .  Once you've passed through a vestibule, an air shower, a changing room and three more doors separating the grime of life from the "clean room" where NASA is building the James Webb Space Telescope, a gust of 72-degree filtered air greets your face. That's the only exposed skin allowed inside. To prepare for the room, shoe-covering booties and a hair net go on first.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
Robert Lee Lyles Jr., who had two careers in his 69 years and excelled at each, died May 27 at his home in Annapolis. A scientist, physician and state policy adviser, Dr. Lyles "was a modern renaissance man with a tremendous curiosity," said Gene Ransom, CEO of MedChi, the Maryland State Medical Society. In April, Dr. Lyles was honored by the Maryland Society of Anesthesiologists by having a scholarship created in his name, "established to support the efforts of MSA members to promote the specialty of anesthesiology and preserve the appropriateness and safety of the delivery of anesthesia in Maryland.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them - and encourages others to do so, as well. For two years, Kalirai, an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history. Now he is the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful. "Astronomy is my passion, and the James Webb Space Telescope is the most exciting astronomy project ever," said Kalirai, 35, of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2005
A billion dollars in projected cost overruns have thrown the $3.5 billion James Webb Space Telescope project into a crisis that could threaten its mission and hundreds of Maryland jobs associated with it. Astronomers designed the 6.8-ton observatory to fly a million miles from the Earth and begin searching in 2011 for the feeble light from the first stars and galaxies that emerged from the darkness after the Big Bang. But with mirror manufacturing under way and $820 million spent, Webb's problems are increasing and scientists are concerned about its future.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
Students at Glenelg Country School will soon be able to use a recent gift to explore worlds they may have seen only in textbooks. Yesterday evening, the school celebrated the opening of its new space observatory with a research-quality telescope. In 2000, three children of Kingdon and Mary Gould, who founded the school in 1954, donated the $35,000 instrument in their parents' name. Nearly three years later, Glenelg Country has completed two small structures to house the telescope on its campus in western Howard County.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, pete.pichaske@gmail.com | April 26, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them — and encourages others to do so as well. Kalirai, 35, is an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. For two years, he worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history, and for the past 2 1/2 years has been the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful than Hubble.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
Future 'Google for Genealogists' The Anne Arundel Genealogical Society meets at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 3 at Severna Park United Methodist Church, 731 Benfield Road. Refreshments and networking follow the meeting. Information: 410-760-9679 or aagensoc.org . Concert Banjoist Jayme Stone's "Room of Wonders" tour makes a stop at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 9 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis. Tickets are $15; $10 for hall members. Information: 410-280-5640 or marylandhall.org . Lecture Donna Hill Staton, a member of the Maryland Board of Education, will give the keynote address, "Protecting Our Children, Protecting Our Future," at 9:30 a.m. Jan. 12 in St. John's College's Francis Scott Key Auditorium, 60 College Ave. in Annapolis.
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