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Telephone Survey

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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
A telephone survey in Sykesville reached less than 20 percent of the town's households, but officials are calling it a boon to charting the municipal future.Results show that 74 percent of the respondents were pleased with local government. That was a comforting pat on the back for the mayor and six-member council. The margin for error was about 6 percent."Our approval rating was unusually high for a government," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "The research shows governments usually get around 30 percent approval."
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NEWS
By Susan Patton and Jonathan David Farley | September 26, 2014
You've heard the statistics: one in four women will be raped in college Or is it " sexually assaulted or almost sexually assaulted"? Or is it "nearly one in five"? Or "one in six"? According to the White House, a rape epidemic is sweeping college campuses , with the #YesAllWomen campaign calling all men weapons of mass destruction. Let's look at some facts. According to the FBI "[t]he rate of forcible rapes in 2012 was estimated at 52.9 per 100,000 female inhabitants.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
A telephone survey in Sykesville reached less than 20 percent of the town's households, but officials are calling it a boon to charting the municipal future.Results show that 74 percent of the respondents were pleased with local government. That was a comforting pat on the back for the mayor and six-member council. The margin for error was about 6 percent."Our approval rating was unusually high for a government," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "The research shows governments usually get around 30 percent approval."
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
By a wide margin, Maryland voters want to raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 a hour, a poll conducted for The Baltimore Sun shows. A majority of voters in every region of the state supports that wage increase, and the proposal has near-unanimous support from African-Americans, according to the poll. Statewide, 69 percent of voters surveyed said they back a proposal now being debated in the General Assembly to increase Maryland's minimum wage from the current federal level of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016.
NEWS
By Susan Patton and Jonathan David Farley | September 26, 2014
You've heard the statistics: one in four women will be raped in college Or is it " sexually assaulted or almost sexually assaulted"? Or is it "nearly one in five"? Or "one in six"? According to the White House, a rape epidemic is sweeping college campuses , with the #YesAllWomen campaign calling all men weapons of mass destruction. Let's look at some facts. According to the FBI "[t]he rate of forcible rapes in 2012 was estimated at 52.9 per 100,000 female inhabitants.
FEATURES
By Michael Davis | March 21, 1993
Because of an editing error, Sun Magazine published an incorrect phone number yesterday for its telephone survey on "Why Husbands Dread Sundays."2 We'll report results back to you in early May.
FEATURES
March 22, 1993
Because of an editing error, Sun Magazine published an incorrect phone number yesterday for its telephone survey on "Why Husbands Dread Sundays."If you were among those who wanted to participate in the phone survey but reached only a busy signal, there is still time to weigh in.Using a touch-tone phone, please call SUNDIAL, the telephone information service of The Baltimore Sun, at (410) 783-1800 any time before midnight Tuesday.Husbands should enter Code 6820, wives Code 6830. An announcer will guide you through a short series of questions.
NEWS
August 19, 1991
With the military's backing, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was ousted today by a group of hard-liners who imposed a state of emergency that sent armored vehicles into the streets.The Evening Sun wants to know what you think of the takeover.Let us know your view by calling SUNDIAL, the free telephone information service of The Baltimore Sun, at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County) before midnight Sunday. Enter category 4600 and await instructions from the announcer. Results of our telephone survey will appear in tomorrow'sEvening Sun.
SPORTS
October 1, 1990
* What have you done for me lately? That seems to be the sentiment of an overwhelming majority of Evening Sun readers and callers to SUNDIAL on the issue of whether the Orioles should try to re-sign catcher Mickey Tettleton, who will be a free agent after the season ends this week.Eighty-three percent of the 1,893 reponses to our "It's Your Call" telephone survey (1,562 callers) said the team should not try to re-sign Tettleton, who has slumped badly this season. Only 331 callers, or 17 percent, said the Orioles should try to re-sign him."
FEATURES
May 29, 1991
People who do not dye their hair outnumber those who do, but not by much, according to a tally of those who responded to our telephone survey. Of 290 callers, 139 (48 percent) said they dye their hair.But a slight majority, 55 percent, said they would consider dying their hair. Of 287 callers who answered the question, 159 said they would consider it.Our questions were in response to a story in Tuesday's health section that cited evidence of hair dye producing adverse reactions in some people.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown has staked out a sizable lead in the Democratic contest for governor, but the primary race is far from decided as many voters have yet to pick a candidate, according to a new opinion poll for The Baltimore Sun. Bolstered by overwhelming support from African-Americans statewide and voters in his home county of Prince George's, Brown is 21 percentage points ahead of his closest competitor, Maryland Attorney General Douglas...
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
We still have a land line at the house. Quaint, you think? But the number is linked to all manner of accounts, and it would be laborious to change. The consequence, of course, is that we expose ourselves to nuisances. Kathleen once succumbed to a caller soliciting contributions for some fund for law enforcement personnel. Now all of them call us, because they pass the lists around. I have no idea whether these appeals come from legitimate organizations of from the type that spends all the income on paying phone solicitors, donating little or none to the charity.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
Five weeks before the election, a measure to legalize same-sex marriage in Maryland has seen a surge of support and is now favored by likely voters, 49 percent to 39 percent, a new Baltimore Sun poll has found. But at this stage, most voters are opposed to the gambling expansion law, according to the poll. And the electorate is conflicted about a measure to give illegal immigrants more access to higher education, with similar percentages supporting the law and opposing it. The outcome of all three referendums will be decided by a Maryland electorate in which the majority Democrats are expected to turn out in large numbers to support President Barack Obama.
NEWS
Matthew Hay Brown | September 26, 2012
Rob Sobhani, the Montgomery County businessman who announced an independent run for the U.S. Senate only this month, has leapt to a statistical tie for second place in the race, according to a Gonzalez poll of Maryland voters released Wednesday. Fifty percent of respondents said they would vote to reelect Sen. Ben Cardin, a Democrat, to a second term. Twenty-two percent said they would vote for Republican former Secret Service agent Dan Bongino; 21 percent said they would vote for Sobhani.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
The hunter-backed effort to bring wild elk back to western Maryland is gaining some steam, though fierce resistance remains in key quarters. A survey done by pro-hunting groups finds that nearly three-fourths of Marylanders asked favor restoring the large, majestic ungulates to the state's mountainous region, which hasn't seen any of the animals since the 1700s. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has been working with the Maryland Legislative Sportsmen's Foundation and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to review the biological, social and economic feasibility of restoring the species in the state.  The telephone survey, done by Responsive Management , a Virginia-based polling firm, was underwritten by the two foundations, according to a DNR press release about it. While the survey found widespread public support for bringing elk back to Maryland, the survey also found a strong current of opposition among some western Maryland farmers and others  who feared the large animals could jeopardize their livelihood, spread disease or damage their property.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
THE SUN POLL The Baltimore Sun commissioned a telephone survey of 742 likely Baltimore Democratic primary voters from Aug. 22 to 24. The Sun's pollster, OpinionWorks of Annapolis, used the Baltimore City Board of Elections database to identify registered voters with a history of voting in municipal primary elections, and gathered survey results from those who ranked their likelihood of voting in the upcoming September primary “50-50”...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 3, 2002
Maryland's First Annual Tobacco Study found significant declines in cigarette smoking in Baltimore, state officials announced yesterday. The report - based on a telephone survey - found that the percentage of adults in Baltimore who smoke cigarettes declined from 28.3 percent in 2000 to 23.6 percent this year. It also found that attempts by adults to quit smoking increased from 47.5 percent in 2000 to 53.7 percent this year. The 2000 data is based on a different survey completed that year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 10, 1992
Eight of 10 Americans say the economy is in bad shape, and President Bush is paying a clear political price for their discontent, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll. But voters know little about the Democrats who would challenge him.The telephone survey, conducted Monday through Wednesday, shows an unpredictable terrain at the start of this election year: -- The president's approval rating is down to 48 percent, and voters are evenly divided when offered a choice between re-electing Mr. Bush or replacing him with an unspecified Democrat.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has opened an imposing lead over her challengers with just weeks to go before the Democratic primary, garnering a larger share of likely voters than all of her rivals combined, according to a Baltimore Sun poll. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents approved of the job Rawlings-Blake has done as mayor since she took office last year, and half of those polled said they plan to vote her back for a full four-year term. "She looked at the city's problems and she handled them in a direct manner," said Lawrence Gray, a retired analyst with the Social Security Administration.
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