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Telephone Calls

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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising side effect of new technologies, Americans' telephone calls are suddenly getting much shorter -- and if the phone companies have their way, those short calls will soon get much more expensive.Despite the nation's long love affair with leisurely phone chats, innovations such as pagers, voice mail, e-mail, electronic credit card readers and fax machines are now abbreviating telephone calls and luring longer connections off the public phone network.Today, as people leave voice mail rather than call back -- or send e-mail rather than call at all -- some 52 percent of residential phone conversations last one minute or less, compared with 22 percent of such short connections in 1982.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
In school, and in court, showing up is half the battle. So when statistics revealed that 60 percent of juveniles charged in Baltimore County were missing their court dates, officials decided they needed something to help make sure the youngsters showed up. The result was the Notification Caller Project, an effort in which a court staffer simply calls juveniles several days before their court dates to remind them — and their parents — of the...
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NEWS
March 7, 2003
Mount Airy Volunteer Fire Company is warning area residents of a possible scheme involving telephone solicitation for donations to the fire company. Complaints have been received about telephone calls asking for a $100 donation to Mount Airy fire company and asking to pick up the check. The fire company does not solicit by telephone. All fire company fund-raisers are conducted by mail or in person for the annual door-to-door photo drive. Solicitors for the photo drive carry fire company credentials.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 29, 2012
A simple automated telephone call may be enough to convice people to take their medicine, a study by Kasier Permanente has found. As part of the study, an automated telephone call was made to patients on cholesteral-reducing drugs who hadn't picked up their medicine two weeks after it was prescribed. A letter was sent a week later if patients still hadn't filled their prescriptions. The calls and letters informed people about the importance of taking the medication and encouraged them to have prescription filled or to call their doctor.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | July 10, 1994
Baltimore County police continue to receive telephone calls with information about the unsolved 1969 slaying of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik, "and there is some substance to the calls," said Capt. Rustin E. Price, head of the homicide squad.Some of the calls have taken investigators to other states because people have moved in the intervening years. "It's tedious work, but we are diligently following up every piece of information we get," Captain Price said.Sister Catherine, a popular teaching nun, disappeared Nov. 7, 1969, after she left on an evening shopping trip from her residence at the Carriage House Apartments on North Bend Road, in Southwest Baltimore.
FEATURES
By William E. Thompson Jr. and William E. Thompson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Actor John Heard will have 18 months of supervised probation and must attend a 22-week program for abusive men at the House of Ruth, Baltimore District Court Judge Barbara B. Waxman decided yesterday.Heard, 51, best known for his role as the father in the "Home Alone" movies, was found guilty in March of trespassing and harassing his ex-girlfriend, "Homicide" actress Melissa Leo, with telephone calls. The charges resulted from a dispute between the two over Heard's visitation rights to their son, John Matthew, 9, who was placed in Leo's custody by a New York judge in 1994.
NEWS
June 26, 1991
The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland this afternoon was scrambling to find the cause of a widespread problem that was preventing the connection of some telephone calls in Maryland, Washington and Virginia.People were getting fast busy signals or recordings when the connection couldn't be made, said Ralph G. Blunt, a C&P spokesman. The intermittent problem first became evident at 11:40 a.m. today. The problem seemed to involve the company's switching stations, which relay calls from one group of telephone exchanges to another.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2004
State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer's tirade at Wednesday's Board of Public Works meeting complaining about immigrants who don't speak English brought about 180 telephone calls to his office yesterday - the vast majority from people who agreed with him, a spokesman said. "It seems like people are in favor of what the comptroller had to say," said Schaefer spokesman Mike Golden. "Only about eight of the calls were opposed." Schaefer, the octogenarian former governor and Baltimore mayor, made the comments, which some described as insensitive and inappropriate, recounting a trip to a McDonald's restaurant where a woman who took his order didn't speak English.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
A 69-year-old Manchester woman, who was told repeatedly in telephone calls from July 20 to July 26 that she was the winner of a $150,000 sweepstakes prize, lost $8,600 to a scam artist last week, according to state police.The woman, whose name was not released, told investigators she received a daily call at her home from a man identifying himself as Carl Williams, an attorney in Las Vegas.He told her he was resolving a bankruptcy claim for a mail sweepstakes company called CMCD, police said.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
An Ellicott City woman is suing her husband's ex-wife for $450,000, claiming she received numerous harassing telephone calls from the woman during the past three years.Mary L. Hauck-Hall also is asking that the court block the ex-wife from calling her and husband, John Hall, at their home.The suit was filed Sept. 10 in Howard County Circuit Court against Betty L. Hall, of Rockville.Ms. Hall denies making any harassing calls.But Mrs. Hauck-Hall claims in the suit that Ms. Hall invaded her privacy by making repeated telephone calls.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
WASHINGTON - At times yesterday, the telephone calls into the Capitol Hill office of Rep. Elijah E. Cummings merged into a single, constant ring. And with a House vote possible today on the $700 billion financial rescue package approved by the Senate, the Baltimore Democrat was hearing from both sides. After meeting last night with his fellow House Democrats, he said he was still "wrestling" with his vote. "We're still trying to make sure that there's clarity with regard to helping people who are facing foreclosure," said Cummings, who voted against a bailout earlier this week.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2006
Michael Stebbins recently joined Rep Stage as artistic director, producer and occasional actor. He is starting his job in spectacular fashion by starring in Fully Committed. Becky Mode's comedy, which runs through Feb. 26, puts Stebbins alone on the stage for an hour and a quarter, playing 40 characters. The show is a series of telephone conversations, with Stebbins acting both sides. The central character, Sam, is an aspiring actor who works in the dingy basement of a posh New York restaurant, answering phones and booking reservations.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
Ravens star running back Jamal Lewis expressed disappointment yesterday that the team had not offered him a contract extension as promised in the preseason and left open the possibility that he might not return for the 2006 season. Lewis, 26, has one year remaining on the original six-year, $35.5 million contract he signed in July 2000 when he was the team's top draft pick and the No. 5 selection overall. Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome has publicly admitted he promised Lewis a new contract after the former University of Tennessee star rushed for 2,066 yards in 2003, but negotiations came to a halt when Lewis was indicted on federal drug charges in February 2004.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2004
State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer's tirade at Wednesday's Board of Public Works meeting complaining about immigrants who don't speak English brought about 180 telephone calls to his office yesterday - the vast majority from people who agreed with him, a spokesman said. "It seems like people are in favor of what the comptroller had to say," said Schaefer spokesman Mike Golden. "Only about eight of the calls were opposed." Schaefer, the octogenarian former governor and Baltimore mayor, made the comments, which some described as insensitive and inappropriate, recounting a trip to a McDonald's restaurant where a woman who took his order didn't speak English.
NEWS
March 7, 2003
Mount Airy Volunteer Fire Company is warning area residents of a possible scheme involving telephone solicitation for donations to the fire company. Complaints have been received about telephone calls asking for a $100 donation to Mount Airy fire company and asking to pick up the check. The fire company does not solicit by telephone. All fire company fund-raisers are conducted by mail or in person for the annual door-to-door photo drive. Solicitors for the photo drive carry fire company credentials.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
To reduce distractions in Anne Arundel County's 911 center, police Chief P. Thomas Shanahan has ordered officers to limit the types of radio and telephone calls they make to emergency dispatchers. The chief's directive, issued last week, also reduces the number of radio channels that 911 operators are required to monitor. The orders were handed down as part of a review of the communications center that began in August when a 911 call about a fatal carjacking was botched. Although Shanahan said the call was mishandled because of "human error," the chief ordered a review of the 911 center's staffing, equipment and operating procedures.
NEWS
September 26, 1997
WHATEVER HIS MOTIVE, President Clinton's threat to keep the Senate in session until it debates and votes on a bill to curb abusive campaign financing practices seems to have had its desired effect. The way is now clear for action on a watered-down reform measure.That is a remarkably positive advance for a proposal that had been shelved by Majority Leader Trent Lott. Still, resistance remains stiff, especially from the Republicans' champion of unlimited party fund-raising, Sen. Mitch McConnell.
NEWS
December 3, 1997
ATTORNEY GENERAL Janet Reno marches to her own drummer. She's not beloved by either the Clinton White House or the Republican Congress. That's why her decision not to name a special prosecutor to probe telephone fund-raising by the president and vice president deserves careful analysis on its own merits.There's no doubt Republicans were gleeful at the prospects of a probe of the president. It's just as true spin-control artists among Democrats did their best to dismiss the allegations as political hot air. The truth probably lies somewhere in between.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 2001
This season's strike zone seems to be causing more conflict between the umpires and Major League Baseball officials than between umpires and players. Umpires are outraged over instructions that have come to some of them in the past 10 days via e-mail and telephone calls from Sandy Alderson, baseball's chief of operations, two persons who had been told by umpires said yesterday. Alderson said that either the messages had been misinterpreted or the reaction "is all part of a political agenda that some people have," stemming from the bitter feelings between two factions of umpires over which union would represent them.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 28, 2000
There are senior citizens out there who, this time around, probably heard from the mayor's office before they heard from their own kids. Not to lay a guilt trip on my fellow baby boomers, but it looks as if that nice, young O'Malley fella scored some serious points with Ma and Pa by getting his people to the phones first. The mayor's office claims to have made about 18,000 telephone calls to see if any of our elderly citizens needed anything during and immediately after Tuesday's storm.
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