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HEALTH
By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News | February 7, 2014
An intensive care unit nurse in a small-town hospital on the Eastern Shore suspected that a patient had necrotizing fasciitis, the so-called "flesh-eating" disease. The condition is rare. Even experienced intensive-care doctors seldom see it, and, since it was nighttime, no such physician was in the ICU. Pinning down the diagnosis was critical - and in this case Berlin's Atlantic General Hospital had backup. A critical-care doctor 125 miles away was monitoring the patient's health via voice, video and high-speed data lines constantly streaming information about vital signs, medications, test results and X-rays, a telemedicine service known as University of Maryland eCare.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News | February 7, 2014
An intensive care unit nurse in a small-town hospital on the Eastern Shore suspected that a patient had necrotizing fasciitis, the so-called "flesh-eating" disease. The condition is rare. Even experienced intensive-care doctors seldom see it, and, since it was nighttime, no such physician was in the ICU. Pinning down the diagnosis was critical - and in this case Berlin's Atlantic General Hospital had backup. A critical-care doctor 125 miles away was monitoring the patient's health via voice, video and high-speed data lines constantly streaming information about vital signs, medications, test results and X-rays, a telemedicine service known as University of Maryland eCare.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 23, 2013
The state Medicaid program is expanding the types of doctors and other medical providers it will reimburse for providing consultation to patients remotely. In the past, Medicaid only reimbursed such telemedicine services for mental health consultation. Now the program will pay for other specialists as well. The patient must be in the office with their physician when the consultation is given. The program is meant to provide better care in areas, such as rural parts of the states, where there is a shortage of specialists.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 23, 2013
The state Medicaid program is expanding the types of doctors and other medical providers it will reimburse for providing consultation to patients remotely. In the past, Medicaid only reimbursed such telemedicine services for mental health consultation. Now the program will pay for other specialists as well. The patient must be in the office with their physician when the consultation is given. The program is meant to provide better care in areas, such as rural parts of the states, where there is a shortage of specialists.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 7, 1994
HONESDALE, Pa. -- It was a routine medical consultation, with a 21st Century twist.Marcellus A. Walker, small town doctor, shined a light into Betty Tuleya's ear and peered in with his otoscope. Harold A. Harvey, a renowned cancer specialist, watched as his colleague examined their patient, who was receiving a follow-up examination after successful surgery for a rare tumor on her adrenal gland.When he finished, Dr. Walker did not pass the instrument over to Dr. Harvey. There was no need. The specialist had seen everything Dr. Walker saw -- and just as clearly.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
Continuing to explore ways to market its medical expertise, Johns Hopkins Medicine announced two health-by-telecommunications deals yesterday.Hopkins will join three other prestigious medical centers -- Massachusetts General Hospital, the Cleveland Clinic and Duke University Medical Center -- in providing telemedicine consulting for a company called WorldCare Limited.And InteliHealth, for which Hopkins provides health information, announced that its World Wide Web health site will be an "anchor tenant" for the Health Channel of the on-line service America Online.
NEWS
By Karen Blum and Karen Blum,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2005
As medical director of the Maryland Perinatal Outreach Program, Dr. Hugh Mighty would spend hours in his car traveling from Baltimore to the far reaches of the state and back just to visit one patient with a high-risk pregnancy. Now, thanks to a pilot telemedicine program, Mighty can talk to several women around the state in one afternoon without ever leaving his office building. With a $200,000 grant from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Mighty, chief of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Maryland Medical Center, has established relationships with St. Mary's Hospital in Leonardtown and Union Hospital in Elkton to offer consultations for high-risk pregnant patients via video teleconference.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
The weather outside was frightful, at 60 below zero, and one of the surgical assistants was a cook. But a family physician at the South Pole has successfully repaired a meteorologist's ruptured kneecap, guided by specialists watching via two-way satellite hookup from Boston, 10,400 miles away. The July 5 operation was the first "telemedicine" surgery ever attempted at the United States' Amundsen Scott South Pole Station. "It went very well, exactly as we planned," says Dr. Bertram Zarins, chief of sports medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, who supervised the surgery from Boston.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After mounting major efforts to foster electronic commerce and connect schools and libraries to the Internet, the federal government is falling short on another ambitious cyberspace goal: using the Net to improve rural medical care.A 2-year-old, $400 million federal program aimed at helping the United States' 22,000 rural medical facilities get high-speed Internet access did not award any money last year because of bureaucratic delays. As of July 6, $289,424 had been distributed to 68 of 452 applicants -- less than one-fifth of the annual $1.4 million cost of administering the program.
NEWS
By Michael James and Joan Jacobson and Michael James and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
No one has stopped Baltimore's "telemedicine man." Not the federal agents who raided his offices, not the state physicians' -- board that has subpoenaed his records, not the former patients who claim he is a reckless doctor loose on the Internet.Eleven months after the widely publicized raid that appeared to end Dr. Pietr Hitzig's medical practice, the resilient and computer-savvy doctor is still online and running a downtown Baltimore treatment center.He has no examining room, no stethoscope, no lab coat.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Are you ready for Watson to join you and your doctor in the examining room? That could be the outcome of a collaboration under way between Watson's creators at IBM and experts at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine. They have begun work on merging the speech recognition and question-answering skills of Watson — the computer that beat two humans on "Jeopardy!" this week — with the vast stores of clinical knowledge and analytical skills in the medical profession.
NEWS
January 9, 2008
The U.S. is facing a shortage of physicians in the next dozen years, but the problem is even more acute in Maryland, where the situation could become severe by 2015, particularly in primary care, emergency medicine and at least a half-dozen specialties. A report released this week by the Maryland Hospital Association warns the situation will be particularly bad in the rural areas, where whole counties may be critically understaffed. Action needs to be taken soon to avert a crisis. In Caroline County, for instance, it's difficult to find a pediatric specialist or to even get an appointment with a urologist or psychiatrist 20 miles or more away in Easton.
NEWS
By Karen Blum and Karen Blum,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2005
As medical director of the Maryland Perinatal Outreach Program, Dr. Hugh Mighty would spend hours in his car traveling from Baltimore to the far reaches of the state and back just to visit one patient with a high-risk pregnancy. Now, thanks to a pilot telemedicine program, Mighty can talk to several women around the state in one afternoon without ever leaving his office building. With a $200,000 grant from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Mighty, chief of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Maryland Medical Center, has established relationships with St. Mary's Hospital in Leonardtown and Union Hospital in Elkton to offer consultations for high-risk pregnant patients via video teleconference.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 25, 2004
After passing out and winding up in an emergency room last year, William Robie agreed to wear a heart-monitoring device about the size of a pager. Each time it alerted him, the 84-year-old Lake Forest, Ill., resident dialed a phone number so the device could transmit data to technicians stationed at LifeWatch Inc. "I seemed to have more incidents at night, so it'd wake me up," Robie said. "I'd transmit the data, reset it and go back to sleep." After monitoring Robie for a month, his cardiologist prescribed a pacemaker.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
The first thing Rinaldo J. Bucci does each morning is have his heart monitored for the sort of trouble that landed him in the hospital in January, short of breath and bloated with fluids. But he doesn't have to leave home. In a low-tech application of telemedicine - technology that enables physicians to consult on cases around the globe by computer hookup - Bucci weighs in with a nurse practitioner at the University of Maryland Medical Center from his bedside in Bel Air. It takes less than 15 minutes for the 70-year-old retired engineer to step on a scale, don a blood-pressure cuff and wrap two heart-rhythm sensors around his wrists.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2002
Two years ago, IC-USA, a startup launched by two Johns Hopkins doctors, had an intriguing idea - using telemedicine to oversee intensive-care patients - and was bringing its first customer on line. Results were dramatic: lower mortality, shorter hospital stays and cost savings for the hospital. But no other customers signed up. Now, the company has a new name, VISICU, a new chief executive and a new business model. And the customers are coming. In recent weeks, VISICU has announced deals with two high-profile clients.
NEWS
January 9, 2008
The U.S. is facing a shortage of physicians in the next dozen years, but the problem is even more acute in Maryland, where the situation could become severe by 2015, particularly in primary care, emergency medicine and at least a half-dozen specialties. A report released this week by the Maryland Hospital Association warns the situation will be particularly bad in the rural areas, where whole counties may be critically understaffed. Action needs to be taken soon to avert a crisis. In Caroline County, for instance, it's difficult to find a pediatric specialist or to even get an appointment with a urologist or psychiatrist 20 miles or more away in Easton.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Are you ready for Watson to join you and your doctor in the examining room? That could be the outcome of a collaboration under way between Watson's creators at IBM and experts at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine. They have begun work on merging the speech recognition and question-answering skills of Watson — the computer that beat two humans on "Jeopardy!" this week — with the vast stores of clinical knowledge and analytical skills in the medical profession.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
The weather outside was frightful, at 60 below zero, and one of the surgical assistants was a cook. But a family physician at the South Pole has successfully repaired a meteorologist's ruptured kneecap, guided by specialists watching via two-way satellite hookup from Boston, 10,400 miles away. The July 5 operation was the first "telemedicine" surgery ever attempted at the United States' Amundsen Scott South Pole Station. "It went very well, exactly as we planned," says Dr. Bertram Zarins, chief of sports medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, who supervised the surgery from Boston.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
There are, says Dr. Brian Rosenfeld, about 5,500 physicians in the country specializing in intensive care -- but to staff every intensive-care unit around the clock would require about 35,000. Without enough specialists to provide round-the-clock coverage, many ICUs are staffed by "intensivists" only during the day, with nurses and residents on evening and overnight shifts. Or those in smaller hospitals don't have specialists at all, and are supervised by other doctors. "Less than half the ICU patients in this country ever interact with an intensive-care specialist," Rosenfeld said.
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