Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTelegram
IN THE NEWS

Telegram

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Scott Shane and Tom Bowman and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
A secret Soviet message released yesterday strengthens the case that Alger Hiss, whose loyalty has been fiercely debated for five decades, was a spy while serving as a top State Department official.The 1945 KGB telegram identifies a high-level State Department official who accompanied President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Yalta Conference as an agent code-named "Ales."A federal government footnote to the telegram, made public by the National Security Agency, identifies "Ales" as "probably Alger Hiss."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 21, 2006
"A beaming Jerry Jones pulled the string, unleashing Saturday afternoon the biggest snake in the NFL's sack. Terrell Owens, the football reptile from hell, slithered into Valley Ranch." Randy Galloway Fort Worth Star- Telegram columnist "With a pencil." Loek Van Mil 7-foot pitcher, when asked how how a guy from the Netherlands signed a contract with the Minnesota Twins "Stephon Marbury came in with a lot of baggage and hasn't found success in New York. But this is a collective effort.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
The bad news came, as it always seems to, in the middle of the night.My wife answered the phone. Shadows cast by the headlights of a passing car rippled through the blinds. "Oh, no," she muttered, still groggy. "Oh, my God. No."She hung up. "Jeff and Ann are dead," she said. She made it sound as though dead were the most improbable thing anyone could ever be."What?""And Siena. There was a car accident."I got up and wandered downstairs. Memories of the Fairbanks family darted through the dark rooms.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
If this were a telegram, we'd say: TLGRM DED. But this is a newspaper, so we'll say this: Western Union sent its final telegram last week, bringing to a close 150 years of shooting messages around the world, of those square message cards, of messenger boys (and later girls) on bikes and in radio cars fanning out across the country to announce births, deaths and everything in between. Western Union was making little money sending telegrams - $500,000 in revenue last year on 20,000 telegrams delivered - and will focus on the more lucrative money transfer business, with revenue of $4 billion annually.
NEWS
February 23, 1999
U.N. tribunal moves to speed up trials in '94 Rwanda genocideARUSHA, Tanzania -- Hoping to speed up its work, the U.N. tribunal trying suspects in the 1994 Rwandan genocide opened a third courtroom yesterday and swore in three new judges.The addition brings to nine the number serving the tribunal, established in November 1994 to bring to justice those responsible for the slaughter in which at least 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed.Rwandan authorities and human rights groups have accused the court -- which has completed work on four cases -- of incompetence.
SPORTS
March 21, 2006
"A beaming Jerry Jones pulled the string, unleashing Saturday afternoon the biggest snake in the NFL's sack. Terrell Owens, the football reptile from hell, slithered into Valley Ranch." Randy Galloway Fort Worth Star- Telegram columnist "With a pencil." Loek Van Mil 7-foot pitcher, when asked how how a guy from the Netherlands signed a contract with the Minnesota Twins "Stephon Marbury came in with a lot of baggage and hasn't found success in New York. But this is a collective effort.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 16, 1992
Recently, I made fun of Dan Quayle for trying to get a campaign contribution from a Baltimore doctor.Quayle had sent the doctor a snazzy come-on letter promising him a special seat at the Republican convention, invitations to fancy balls and meetings with bigwigs if the doctor would cough up $1,000 a year.But it turns out the doctor is a lifelong Democrat, who just happens to loathe Dan Quayle.Which I thought was pretty funny. Until a few days ago when I came across something even dumber than Republicans trying to get money out of Democrats:Bill Clinton trying to get money out of me.His letter came disguised as a telegram.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 29, 1991
Well, it wasn't manna from heaven, but it was a win, which amounted to almost the same thing.It meant John Oates got back his appetite.Admit it, you were worried. You hardly knew the guy, but when Oates lost 9 pounds in four days, at the least you wanted him to get his thyroid checked out. The problem was simpler. Until the Orioles won, the new manager couldn't eat.For diets, I'll go with the Lasorda stuff, thank you. Oates is just lucky he didn't get the job in '88. After only four losses, Oates was melting, and I don't mean tuna-melting either.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It's a practice as old as politics -- casting ballots in the names of dead people. But in a new twist to tradition, dead people and other unsuspecting voters are apparently now lobbying politicians on Capitol Hill.Last week, representatives of the nation's biggest phone companies shipped thousands of telegrams to House members before they voted on a sweeping telecommunications bill. The trouble is, at least one of the senders is dead, and some are confined to nursing homes or hospitals.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
If this were a telegram, we'd say: TLGRM DED. But this is a newspaper, so we'll say this: Western Union sent its final telegram last week, bringing to a close 150 years of shooting messages around the world, of those square message cards, of messenger boys (and later girls) on bikes and in radio cars fanning out across the country to announce births, deaths and everything in between. Western Union was making little money sending telegrams - $500,000 in revenue last year on 20,000 telegrams delivered - and will focus on the more lucrative money transfer business, with revenue of $4 billion annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafer Guzman and Rafer Guzman,Newsday | January 25, 2004
Now, why didn't you think of this? A New York start-up company is updating the old singing telegram with an urban twist: the Rapagram. The concept is almost ridiculously simple: Instead of flowers or a card, you can send a friend or loved one (or hated one) a personalized rap, written and delivered by one of Rapagram's half-dozen MCs. Choose from the Rapagram, the Dissagram or the Krush-On-U-Gram, among others. And for an extra charge, you can add flowers or chocolates. The Manhattan company was founded by Gail Powell and Nelson Rodriguez, two struggling rappers still holding day jobs to make ends meet.
NEWS
By David Perlmutt and David Perlmutt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 3, 2002
WARRENTON, Va. - Through the rolling horse-and-hunt country of Northern Virginia, down a rural road lined by stone walls, retired airline pilot Ken Hyde is rediscovering flight by crawling delicately into the genius of Wilbur and Orville Wright. In a sprawling hangar, Hyde and his team of mechanics, machinists, woodworkers and engineers are reproducing the 1903 Wright Flyer One that will be flown on the North Carolina Outer Banks on Dec. 17, 2003 - at the anniversary of the exact moment the Dayton, Ohio, brothers propelled the world into powered flight 100 years earlier.
NEWS
February 23, 1999
U.N. tribunal moves to speed up trials in '94 Rwanda genocideARUSHA, Tanzania -- Hoping to speed up its work, the U.N. tribunal trying suspects in the 1994 Rwandan genocide opened a third courtroom yesterday and swore in three new judges.The addition brings to nine the number serving the tribunal, established in November 1994 to bring to justice those responsible for the slaughter in which at least 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed.Rwandan authorities and human rights groups have accused the court -- which has completed work on four cases -- of incompetence.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Scott Shane and Tom Bowman and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
A secret Soviet message released yesterday strengthens the case that Alger Hiss, whose loyalty has been fiercely debated for five decades, was a spy while serving as a top State Department official.The 1945 KGB telegram identifies a high-level State Department official who accompanied President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Yalta Conference as an agent code-named "Ales."A federal government footnote to the telegram, made public by the National Security Agency, identifies "Ales" as "probably Alger Hiss."
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
The bad news came, as it always seems to, in the middle of the night.My wife answered the phone. Shadows cast by the headlights of a passing car rippled through the blinds. "Oh, no," she muttered, still groggy. "Oh, my God. No."She hung up. "Jeff and Ann are dead," she said. She made it sound as though dead were the most improbable thing anyone could ever be."What?""And Siena. There was a car accident."I got up and wandered downstairs. Memories of the Fairbanks family darted through the dark rooms.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It's a practice as old as politics -- casting ballots in the names of dead people. But in a new twist to tradition, dead people and other unsuspecting voters are apparently now lobbying politicians on Capitol Hill.Last week, representatives of the nation's biggest phone companies shipped thousands of telegrams to House members before they voted on a sweeping telecommunications bill. The trouble is, at least one of the senders is dead, and some are confined to nursing homes or hospitals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafer Guzman and Rafer Guzman,Newsday | January 25, 2004
Now, why didn't you think of this? A New York start-up company is updating the old singing telegram with an urban twist: the Rapagram. The concept is almost ridiculously simple: Instead of flowers or a card, you can send a friend or loved one (or hated one) a personalized rap, written and delivered by one of Rapagram's half-dozen MCs. Choose from the Rapagram, the Dissagram or the Krush-On-U-Gram, among others. And for an extra charge, you can add flowers or chocolates. The Manhattan company was founded by Gail Powell and Nelson Rodriguez, two struggling rappers still holding day jobs to make ends meet.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 16, 1992
Recently, I made fun of Dan Quayle for trying to get a campaign contribution from a Baltimore doctor.Quayle had sent the doctor a snazzy come-on letter promising him a special seat at the Republican convention, invitations to fancy balls and meetings with bigwigs if the doctor would cough up $1,000 a year.But it turns out the doctor is a lifelong Democrat, who just happens to loathe Dan Quayle.Which I thought was pretty funny. Until a few days ago when I came across something even dumber than Republicans trying to get money out of Democrats:Bill Clinton trying to get money out of me.His letter came disguised as a telegram.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.