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Telecommuting

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BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1991, Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 29, 1991
You work at home and communicate with the office by computer and telephone. (Or you'd like to.) It's called telecommuting.In the past, those of you who worked at home encountered barriers, and you still do, such as zoning and taxes. Are you conducting business in a residential area? If you have the option of commuting to a conventional business office, can you take the home office deduction on your tax return?Now many of these barriers may be swept away. Why? Credit the environment and the war. At first the connections may seem strained, yet the Environmental Protection Agency has come up with some compelling statistics.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
Many Baltimore County employees will be able to work from homeup to half the time under a telecommuting policy announced Tuesday by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. The county will offer telecommuting to workers in all agencies. Kamenetz said telecommuting will benefit the environment, make employees happier and increase productivity. Not all employees' work can be done fromhome, officials said. Employees will be able to apply in January. Those who are approved will be able to work remotely up to five days for every two-week pay period.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
When Christine Snyder woke up to find a thick sheet of ice around her Hunt Valley home yesterday, she decided not to go to the office, but that didn't mean she took the day off.Ms. Snyder, a partner in the accounting firm of Price Waterhouse, just threw on her sweatsuit, sat down in front of her personal computer, tapped into her office data banks and got down to work. "The business is continuing to hum," she said.From icebound Baltimore to earthquake-stricken Los Angeles, many businesses continued to hum yesterday even though workplaces were dark and deserted.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
Employees at Carefirst BlueCross BlueShield, the region's largest insurer, can work from home several days a week. Hunt Valley-based McCormick & Co. lets some full-time spice plant employees work four-day weeks. And in the "flexible workplace" of Harris-Kupfer Architects in Baltimore, employees' kids can tag along to the office, where they curl up on the lounge couch to play video games on snow days. However they define it, more companies in Maryland and beyond have adopted flexible workplace policies.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 8, 1998
I THINK telecommuting is a bust as a workplace lifestyle.My sister, fed up with clients calling during dinner time and at bedtime, finally kicked her telecommuting lawyer husband out of the house, trussed like a goose in his multiple phone lines.My spouse, facing a drive to work that might soon double, won't even consider telecommuting. He believes the fire dogs need to be in the firehouse when the siren sounds.And, ending the ultimate telecommuting experiment, 200,000 people who were told to work at home during the Atlanta Olympics hopped back in their cars the Monday morning after and were glad to do it.The notion that we were all going to save the environment and smooth the conflicts between work and home by sitting at a computer terminal in a bathrobe and slippers until the kids arrived home from school is a bust as a trend.
BUSINESS
By Kathleen Murray and Kathleen Murray,Orange County Register | April 13, 1992
IRVINE, Calif. -- Everyone expected Sally McManus to have quite the life when she started working at home one day a week.Her friends joked that she would be at her desk in a bathrobe and curlers. Her boss suggested that she do laundry between phone calls. And there were always her children to play with.Now, six months later, Ms. McManus, 40, a technical writer from Unisys Corp., often wears work clothes when telecommuting. She figures that she puts in at least as many hours at her home in Irvine as she would at the office in Mission Viejo, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
Every morning, you can see thousands of them, one to a car, clogging the Beltway as they drive to an office to make phone calls and type at a computer -- work they could do just as easily at a home office.That's changing. A handful of Maryland employers, from Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to the Montgomery County government, are experimenting with "telecommuting," allowing employees to work at home, in offices equipped with computers and telephones.And more employers are likely to follow soon because of reports like a recent AT&T survey that found that telecommuting boosts productivity, makes workers happier and cuts companies' space costs.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | November 8, 1993
Cathy Markey always thought it would be nice to have a couch in her Baltimore office. The idea of lying down for a few minutes sounded so appealing after her exhausting morning routine of getting her two children up, taking them to day care and catching the Metro to work.Now Ms. Markey has a bed in her office and she never uses it. But there's one big difference in her life. Her office is in a spare room in her comfortable Westminster home.Equipped with a computer, a modem and a fax, Ms. Markey does her work as a production editor for the North Charles Street Design Organization from her home office.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 31, 1994
SANTA CLARITA, Calif. -- Happily secluded from the metropolis 30 miles away, residents of this picturesque desert valley north of Los Angeles are finding themselves trapped in their own paradise.Many of them had fled up the Golden State Freeway over the last decade in search of a spot where the streets were safer and the air clear enough for a view of the encircling San Gabriel, Santa Susana and Tehachapi Mountains.Their entire outlook changed at 4:31 a.m. on Jan. 17.When the 6.6-magnitude earthquake dropped the Golden State Freeway like it was made of toy blocks, people in the Santa Clarita Valley realized how tenuous and how important their sole concrete connection to the big city really was.Suddenly, half of those in the valley's work force found that, instead of their usual 30- to 40-minute commute, they had to endure five-hour, bumper-to-bumper trips on side roads.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2003
Is work a tough place to, well, work? People looking for a new job say telecommuting is a top priority among job perks, according to a survey of more than 200 people. The survey also found that 80 percent believe telecommuting would make them more productive in their current jobs. Of the more than 200 respondents, 47 percent said they telecommute now, with 41 percent of those working from home at least 20 hours per week. The popularity relates to flexible work hours, the benefit noted by 43 percent.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
An effort to expand telecommuting by federal workers ran afoul Thursday of a newly intensified Republican strategy to highlight government spending as an election-year issue. The House of Representatives rejected a telework measure, introduced by Rep. John Sarbanes of Maryland, that would require uniform rules for federal employees who work at sites other than their regular government offices, such as their homes. In addition to improving government productivity, proponents say, telecommuting can reduce traffic congestion in places like the Baltimore-Washington corridor and lessen air pollution by taking cars off the road.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | July 14, 2008
Beth Vessey lives 36 miles from her Howard County government job in Ellicott City. And although her Toyota Camry gets a healthy 29 miles to the gallon, commuting four days a week instead of five sounds appealing. "It would save me a lot of money," said Vessey, who lives near Westminster. "It seems like it might be a good idea." Vessey, who has worked in the Howard County communications office for 20 years, took notice when County Executive Ken Ulman announced last week that alternative work schedules will be available for some county employees.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 4, 2008
One superhighway is jammed and expensive. The other is open and cheap. So, next time, take the route to work with no choking emissions, no raised middle fingers and no $4 gas. Sit at your computer and drive straight ahead. Now that Maryland has built one of the world's best broadband networks, let's use it to grease the economy and cut costs ranging from filling the tank to pollution to road construction to high blood pressure. Oil at $140 and what's called "telework" were made for each other like migraines and aspirin.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | May 28, 2008
What are recent college graduates looking for most in a job? A flexible schedule? Opportunities for creativity and personal growth? High salary? None of the above. Instead, these 20-something workers are most interested in advancement opportunities and job security, at least according to research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. The group surveyed 19,000 people from 370 schools nationwide. It asked them to rate 15 job attributes in terms of importance and then asked them to rank one attribute against another.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | September 9, 2007
If he had to show up every day in his office at the Defense Information Systems Agency, Greg Krawczyk says he probably wouldn't be working there. The round-trip commute between his waterfront Pasadena home and the agency's headquarters in Arlington, Va., can take 2 1/2 to four hours - sometimes longer, depending on traffic and weather. But thanks to the agency's liberal tele-work and work schedule policy, Krawczyk, 48, says he only has to make that grueling drive around congested Washington every other workday.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
The Defense Information Systems Agency, one of the largest federal commands moving to Maryland as part of a national military realignment, announced yesterday it has opened a telecommuting center at Fort Meade - the first step toward moving its 4,300 workers to the Army post. The agency is the first to establish a foothold in Maryland among those transferring here as part of the base realignment and closure process known as BRAC, which is expected to bring tens of thousands of defense jobs to Maryland over the next five years.
NEWS
By TYEESHA DIXON and TYEESHA DIXON,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
Paula Brantner's job as a program director for a nonprofit group is centered in San Francisco. But she works from her home in Silver Spring. Brantner is a long-distance telecommuter - and has been for more than four years. She makes up just a sliver of the work force that is employed in a home office that is far from the company's main headquarters. Yet a number of businesses have gone to geographic extremes by allowing workers to telecommute full time - even if they live halfway around the world.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH HEUBECK and ELIZABETH HEUBECK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2005
On most workdays, account executive Jean Gunning's highly orchestrated commuting routine begins at 7:30 a.m. when she leaves her Towson home and arrives about two hours later at her office in Washington. She follows a similar path home, getting in on most nights after dark. "On the days I commute, I can't do anything other than work, eat, and sleep," she says. But once a week, Gunning avoids the commuter shuffle by telecommuting from her home office. "It's great to actually be home in Baltimore at 6 p.m. and make a real dinner that doesn't come out of a box," Gunning says.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | January 31, 2007
As much as we want flexibility in our jobs, we seem to be burdened by our doubts. Would I appear less committed? How would it affect my career? What would my colleagues think? Such ambiguity continues to exist even though many companies allow employees to work flexible hours, telecommute and take an extended break to raise children or take care of other personal business. This perk is considered one way to attract and retain the best people. A new survey shows the dilemma many workers face.
NEWS
By ERIC PETERS | June 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- "Road rage" is now an official disease - intermittent explosive disorder, the shrinks call it. According to a study funded by the National Institutes of Mental Health, about 16 million Americans suffer from IED. Inadequate production of the brain chemical serotonin leaves victims unable to regulate their moods properly - and thus, their behavior on the nation's crowded highways. But is IED really a malady? Or just the natural expression of a heavily overtaxed fight-or-flight mechanism that has been intrinsic to human nature since time immemorial?
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