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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
The head of the Maryland Public Service Commission is resigning to work for a telecommunications industry group.H. Russell Frisby Jr. will leave his post as PSC chairman by the end of this month to take the presidency of the Competitive Telecommunications Association, a Washington organization that does lobbying and advocacy work for communications companies."
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BUSINESS
By Ken Belson and Ken Belson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2005
If SBC Communications succeeds in buying its former parent, AT&T Corp., the reunion of two players in the old Bell System could set off another round of mergers in the rapidly consolidating phone industry. In other industries, a dwindling number of players typically means fewer choices and higher prices for consumers. Yet in the telecommunications industry, technology is turning that logic on its head. Cell phones, high-speed Internet connections and video - not plain old phone lines - now determine the winners and losers in today's market.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
Members of the General Assembly's ethics committee admonished Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr. yesterday not to sponsor legislation involving his employer's clients after disclosures revealed that he introduced half a dozen bills related to businesses his law firm represents. Giannetti was rebuked during a regular session of the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics yesterday at which Giannetti was told that ethics law prohibits lawmakers from sponsoring bills in which their employer is the only party affected or is a predominant member of the affected group.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
Members of the General Assembly's ethics committee admonished Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr. yesterday not to sponsor legislation involving his employer's clients after disclosures revealed that he introduced half a dozen bills related to businesses his law firm represents. Giannetti was rebuked during a regular session of the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics yesterday at which Giannetti was told that ethics law prohibits lawmakers from sponsoring bills in which their employer is the only party affected or is a predominant member of the affected group.
NEWS
October 11, 1994
Someone built a speed bump in the middle of the information superhighway.It's not clear who the culprit was, but there are plenty of candidates. The effort to bring federal regulation of the rapidly transforming telecommunications industry has been slowed. So, inevitably, will innovation in bringing the fruits of the electronic revolution to the homes of U.S. consumers.A bill to revise the 60-year-old federal communications law was ,, one of the most thoroughly studied and heavily lobbied measures in this Congress.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a battle of two titans in the telecommunications industry, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. moved yesterday to block Britain's biggest phone company from gaining broader access to the U.S. market until AT&T is allowed to compete in Britain.Both AT&T and British Telecommunications PLC want to provide everything from phone service to high-speed data transmission and video services to multinational companies. These private global corporate networks represent one of the hottest segments of the telecommunications industry, and all the world's phone giants are vying for the business.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 1997
For decades Americans have assumed, correctly, that they could call "800" telephone numbers free, any time and from any )) telephone.But as a result of the federal government's deregulation of the telecommunications industry, consumers may soon find that they are unable to call some toll-free numbers from the nation's roughly 2 million public pay phones.In a little-noticed move that could cost U.S. consumers and businesses almost $1 billion a year, the Federal Communications Commission ruled in October that owners of toll-free numbers must pay a fee of 28.4 cents a call to owners of pay phones when customers dial a toll-free line from a public phone.
NEWS
October 13, 1999
CONSOLIDATION rather than competition seems the defining dynamic among the nation's largest telecommunications companies. Last week, SBC Communications received federal approval to purchase Ameritech. Hours earlier,MCI Worldcom announced its $115 billion acquisition of Sprint.Buying the competition has become a priority in the new era of communications. The reason is simple: The industry is no longer centered around the telephone.To survive, telecommunications companies must transmit data and video images as well as voice.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
Bell Atlantic, city-school and elected officials today will dedicate a training facility designed to give high school students entree into careers as telecommunications technicians.The telecommunications training lab is at Edmondson Westside High School and was built over the past year with more than $500,000 in time, equipment and other resources donated by Bell Atlantic Corp., telecommunications vendors such as Lucent Technologies Inc., several retailers and the school system, according to Bill Darden, Bell Atlantic's director of central office engineering.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | January 5, 1994
NEW YORK -- In what amounted to a declaration of war on the nation's local telephone companies, MCI Communications Corp. said yesterday that it is building a $20 billion telecommunications network that will allow consumers to choose their local phone company just as they now choose their long-distance carrier.Drawing a parallel with MCI's successful battle a decade ago to introduce competition for long-distance telephone calls, which used to be monopolized by AT&T, MCI officials said the "Baby Bells" would find their local monopolies challenged over the coming years.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The fragile balance of power in the telecommunications industry may have tilted a bit more toward the powerful regional Bell phone companies after Tuesday's national elections. Legislation that would help local phone giants such as Verizon Communications Corp. gain in areas such as broadband Internet service has been blocked by the Democratic-led Senate. And the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael K. Powell, has been restrained from pushing an aggressive deregulatory agenda that might favor the Bells because of the party split in Congress.
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
This is a planet of data gluttons. The latest estimates show Internet traffic - everything from e-mail to photos to full-length Hollywood films - is doubling every 100 days or so. And the thought of this tidal wave of ones and zeroes makes people such as Jeff Ferry smile. Ferry heads the marketing department at Yafo Networks Inc., a closely watched start-up in Hanover that makes gear for optical communications networks. The use of light to transmit voice, video and data over hair-thin glass fibers has become the backbone of the Internet during the past decade.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
They are, quite literally, the nuts and bolts of a multibillion-dollar industry. Or, to be more precise, the hex nuts and the pal nuts, the U-bolts and J-bolts and concrete base bolts. The little metal fasteners sit in small bins stacked near the conveyor belt, which snakes along the warehouse floor like a clattering, metallic river. These nuts and bolts are destined to become part of the emblematic gizmos of the Communications Age, the mobile phones and cell towers that have changed our physical landscape and our methods of interaction.
NEWS
October 13, 1999
CONSOLIDATION rather than competition seems the defining dynamic among the nation's largest telecommunications companies. Last week, SBC Communications received federal approval to purchase Ameritech. Hours earlier,MCI Worldcom announced its $115 billion acquisition of Sprint.Buying the competition has become a priority in the new era of communications. The reason is simple: The industry is no longer centered around the telephone.To survive, telecommunications companies must transmit data and video images as well as voice.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
In the frenetic telecommunications industry, where companies spring up like April grass, only a few firms have managed to develop and retain a truly distinct corporate character. AT&T Corp. is the distinguished, slightly dotty patriarch, looking to regain the vibrancy of youth. MCI WorldCom Inc. is the pushy parvenu gunning for the top spot.Then there is Comsat Corp. If Maryland's most prominent telecommunications company were a person, it would be an aging playboy with a glamorous past and a squandered inheritance.
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall | August 2, 1998
MERGERMANIA is sweeping through the telecommunications industry in earnest. Last week, British Telecommunications PLC. and AT&T Corp. reached an agreement for a joint venture in the wake of AT&T's announcement to acquire Tele-Communications Inc. Bell Atlantic Corp., which oversees local phone service from Maine to Virginia, has announced its bid to buy GTE in a stock swap. And there is the pending $62 billion deal for SBC Communications Inc., the product of two Baby Bells, to take over the Midwest's Ameritech Corp.
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall | August 2, 1998
MERGERMANIA is sweeping through the telecommunications industry in earnest. Last week, British Telecommunications PLC. and AT&T Corp. reached an agreement for a joint venture in the wake of AT&T's announcement to acquire Tele-Communications Inc. Bell Atlantic Corp., which oversees local phone service from Maine to Virginia, has announced its bid to buy GTE in a stock swap. And there is the pending $62 billion deal for SBC Communications Inc., the product of two Baby Bells, to take over the Midwest's Ameritech Corp.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1998
Yurie Systems Inc., a Landover telecommunications equipment firm that has emerged as one of Maryland's top high-technology companies, is being bought by Lucent Technologies Inc. in an all-cash deal valued at about $1 billion.The companies announced the planned acquisition yesterday, and said that they expected the purchase to close by the end of June.While the Yurie name will disappear, the company's operations will remain in Landover, and no job losses are anticipated. Yurie has 240 employees nationwide, 212 of whom are in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
Bell Atlantic, city-school and elected officials today will dedicate a training facility designed to give high school students entree into careers as telecommunications technicians.The telecommunications training lab is at Edmondson Westside High School and was built over the past year with more than $500,000 in time, equipment and other resources donated by Bell Atlantic Corp., telecommunications vendors such as Lucent Technologies Inc., several retailers and the school system, according to Bill Darden, Bell Atlantic's director of central office engineering.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1998
Yurie Systems Inc., a Landover telecommunications equipment firm that has emerged as one of Maryland's top high-technology companies, is being bought by Lucent Technologies Inc. in an all-cash deal valued at about $1 billion.The companies announced the planned acquisition yesterday, and said that they expected the purchase to close by the end of June.While the Yurie name will disappear, the company's operations will remain in Landover, and no job losses are anticipated. Yurie has 240 employees nationwide, 212 of whom are in Maryland.
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