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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 21, 2000
Tessco Technologies Inc., the Hunt Valley telecommunications equipment maker, said yesterday that its fourth-quarter net income, buoyed by a 40 percent jump in sales, more than doubled to $1.4 million, or 31 cents a share. The surge in sales, to $56.3 million for the three months ended March 26, was attributed to strong demand for services and products, particularly sales of test and maintenance products. Tessco said the quarterly sales figure was a record. In the fourth quarter a year earlier, Tessco booked a $468,000 profit on sales of $40.3 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
U.S. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger will be included in a "60 Minutes" piece Sunday looking at Huawei, a Chinese telecommunications equipment maker, that members of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence see as a threat to national security. Here's the release from CBS News with a quote from Ruppersberger:            Huawei, a global Chinese telecommunications equipment manufacturer already doing business in the U.S., poses a threat to national and corporate security say members of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.  Those congressmen speak to Steve Kroft for a 60 MINUTES investigation to be broadcast Sunday, Oct. 7 (7:30-8:30PM, ET, 7:00-8:00PM, PT)
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BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | July 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Japan is not carrying out its commitment last fall to buy more foreign -- mainly U.S. -- telecommunications equipment, U.S. electronics industry executives complained yesterday."
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III and WILLIAM PATALON III,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
Ciena Corp. will open its first research and development center in India, creating as many as 300 jobs over three years and enabling the struggling telecommunications equipment firm to benefit from the country's low wages and rapidly accelerating technological know-how. Nicole Anderson, a spokeswoman for the Linthicum firm, said yesterday that the move will "allow Ciena to capitalize on the expertise that has emerged in that region," which remains one of the world's fastest-growing markets for telecommunications equipment.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Barely beating Wall Street expectations, Ciena Corp. said yesterday that it had net income of $1.6 million, or 1 cent per diluted share, in the quarter ending April 30.An analyst survey released just before the earnings sheet came out predicted that the Linthicum-based telecommunications equipment maker would break even on its second fiscal quarter.For the corresponding period last year, Ciena reported $15.2 million in net income, or 14 cents per share.Revenue for the quarter was $111.5 million, down from the $142.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Corvis Corp., a private Columbia telecommunications equipment company that has major increases in building and hiring in the works but had kept its product plans secret, finally revealed some of those plans yesterday.Corvis has generated more curiosity than most other tech startups, since its president and chief executive officer, David Huber, was the founder of Ciena Corp., a Linthicum telecommunications equipment maker that set records for its initial public offering and first-year sales.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
Ciena Corp. of Linthicum and Broadwing Corp. of Columbia, both in the telecommunications business, announced yesterday that they have settled a nearly 5-year-old patent dispute, dismissing all claims. Broadwing will pay Ciena $35 million over three years but can get credit for $33 million of that by buying Ciena equipment and services at market prices. The two companies have a complex, intertwined history. Ciena, which makes telecommunications equipment, was launched in 1992 and went public in 1997 with an initial public offering that raised $3.4 billion, a record at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
U.S. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger will be included in a "60 Minutes" piece Sunday looking at Huawei, a Chinese telecommunications equipment maker, that members of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence see as a threat to national security. Here's the release from CBS News with a quote from Ruppersberger:            Huawei, a global Chinese telecommunications equipment manufacturer already doing business in the U.S., poses a threat to national and corporate security say members of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.  Those congressmen speak to Steve Kroft for a 60 MINUTES investigation to be broadcast Sunday, Oct. 7 (7:30-8:30PM, ET, 7:00-8:00PM, PT)
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
An Oklahoma-based telecommunications company said yesterday that it will use Ciena Corp.'s equipment to build part of its North American network. The deal is worth tens of millions of dollars, according to the Tulsa, Okla., company, AFN Communications. AFN has 8,000 miles of network fiber in 13 Northeastern states, including Maryland. Of those, only 2,000 miles are "lit," or running. Through the deal announced yesterday, AFN will use Linthicum-based Ciena's telecommunications equipment to light some of the remaining miles of fiber.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2002
Shares of Ciena Corp., the Linthicum maker of fiber-optic equipment, slid 7 percent by the end of trading yesterday after Moody's Investor Service Inc. said it was reviewing the company's debt for a possible downgrade. Moody's said in a statement that the review is in response to uncertainty in the telecommunications market along with a fall in demand for Ciena's products. "The review is prompted by the collapse in demand for Ciena's next-generation optical networking products, having led to an operating loss in FY 2002 Q1 and further loss expected in FY 2002 Q2, combined with the overall uncertainty that has engulfed the market for telecommunications equipment and the company's prospects for profit recovery," Moody's said.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
Ciena Corp. of Linthicum and Broadwing Corp. of Columbia, both in the telecommunications business, announced yesterday that they have settled a nearly 5-year-old patent dispute, dismissing all claims. Broadwing will pay Ciena $35 million over three years but can get credit for $33 million of that by buying Ciena equipment and services at market prices. The two companies have a complex, intertwined history. Ciena, which makes telecommunications equipment, was launched in 1992 and went public in 1997 with an initial public offering that raised $3.4 billion, a record at the time.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
There's a new royal-blue lab jacket that hangs with all the others on the rack at Corvis Corp., only this one was custom-ordered to fit the lofty build of the company's new president, James M. Bannantine. At 6 feet 5 inches tall, Bannantine still has the frame from when he coached and played volleyball years ago, and he is quick to offer jokes about the Corvis basketball team. But he is not at this Columbia fiber-optics company for a game; he is there to triumph over a challenge, and a new lab coat isn't the only thing he hopes to bring to the company.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2002
Shares of Ciena Corp., the Linthicum maker of fiber-optic equipment, slid 7 percent by the end of trading yesterday after Moody's Investor Service Inc. said it was reviewing the company's debt for a possible downgrade. Moody's said in a statement that the review is in response to uncertainty in the telecommunications market along with a fall in demand for Ciena's products. "The review is prompted by the collapse in demand for Ciena's next-generation optical networking products, having led to an operating loss in FY 2002 Q1 and further loss expected in FY 2002 Q2, combined with the overall uncertainty that has engulfed the market for telecommunications equipment and the company's prospects for profit recovery," Moody's said.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The telecommunications sector continues to be riddled with cutbacks -- ranging from layoffs to lowered financial forecasts. Ciena Corp., the Linthicum-based fiber-optics equipment maker, lowered financial forecasts for its fiscal first quarter and laid off 400 workers, or 12 percent of its staff, this month. The company also cut 380 jobs in November. Corvis Corp. of Columbia reported that its revenue in the fourth quarter was less than a third of what it was during the corresponding quarter one year earlier.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
An Oklahoma-based telecommunications company said yesterday that it will use Ciena Corp.'s equipment to build part of its North American network. The deal is worth tens of millions of dollars, according to the Tulsa, Okla., company, AFN Communications. AFN has 8,000 miles of network fiber in 13 Northeastern states, including Maryland. Of those, only 2,000 miles are "lit," or running. Through the deal announced yesterday, AFN will use Linthicum-based Ciena's telecommunications equipment to light some of the remaining miles of fiber.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Ciena Corp., one of the last makers of telecommunications equipment to buck the sector implosion, slashed its revenue and profit estimates for the fourth quarter and the year yesterday, sending its shares tumbling about 30 percent. "The whole industry has taken a hit, and Ciena's been sort of the lone holdout, and everyone's wondered if they could maintain that status," said Joe Gladue, a telecom equipment analyst for the Chapman Co. in Baltimore. But yesterday, the Linthicum-based fiber-optic equipment maker saw its shares tumble $8.50 to close at $19.62 after issuing revised estimates for the rest of this year and next year.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III and WILLIAM PATALON III,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
Ciena Corp. will open its first research and development center in India, creating as many as 300 jobs over three years and enabling the struggling telecommunications equipment firm to benefit from the country's low wages and rapidly accelerating technological know-how. Nicole Anderson, a spokeswoman for the Linthicum firm, said yesterday that the move will "allow Ciena to capitalize on the expertise that has emerged in that region," which remains one of the world's fastest-growing markets for telecommunications equipment.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
Like sumo wrestlers bulking up for combat, big telecommunications equipment companies are girding for battle by gobbling up smaller firms.This trend has been starkly evident in Maryland. In little over a month, the state has seen two of its most promising young telecom-equipment makers get swallowed by larger companies.Linthicum-based Ciena Corp., which makes devices that expand the capacity of communications networks, agreed last week to be bought by Tellabs Inc. of Lisle, Ill., for $6.9 billion.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
U.S. factory output fell for the eighth straight month in May, but consumer prices remained tame - a one-two combination that analysts say virtually guarantees that Federal Reserve policy-makers will cut interest rates yet again this month to dodge the first recession in a decade. Yesterday's reports on industrial production and the Consumer Price Index, as well as some high-profile profit warnings, highlight the crosscurrents that are buffeting an economy facing its first real downturn since the 1990-1991 recession, analysts and economists said.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and By Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2000
British telecommunications component maker Bookham Technology PLC said yesterday that it will establish its North American headquarters in Columbia, bringing hundreds of jobs to the region and bolstering an emerging high-tech cluster. The announcement clinches a deal that The Sun had reported Friday was in advanced negotiations. Bookham plans to move in February into the former Honeywell International Inc. building in Columbia's Oakland Ridge Industrial Park. The 150,000-square-foot building will house marketing, sales and applications components and a "very extensive" manufacturing operation, according to Andy Quinn, Bookham's president for North American operations.
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