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BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2001
Turn on the TV or radio. Drive along the interstate. Open a newspaper or magazine. They're everywhere, or so it seems. Advertisements for telecommunications companies and their services - wireless phones, long-distance calling, Internet connections and Web-enabled phones - are hard to miss. Technology and the deregulation of the phone industry aren't just changing the way we communicate with each other. Almost overnight, the field has become a marketing force trying to communicate to us. AT&T Broadband has its orb logo that morphs into various shapes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
U.S. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger will be included in a "60 Minutes" piece Sunday looking at Huawei, a Chinese telecommunications equipment maker, that members of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence see as a threat to national security. Here's the release from CBS News with a quote from Ruppersberger:            Huawei, a global Chinese telecommunications equipment manufacturer already doing business in the U.S., poses a threat to national and corporate security say members of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.  Those congressmen speak to Steve Kroft for a 60 MINUTES investigation to be broadcast Sunday, Oct. 7 (7:30-8:30PM, ET, 7:00-8:00PM, PT)
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BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 2006
Are you getting your money's worth from caller ID? Some callers can't be identified because their information is blocked or unavailable, but in other cases the callers aren't named because the customer's phone company simply doesn't want to spend the money to obtain the data. A small Boston Globe test of caller ID accuracy found several instances in which Verizon Communications and Comcast Corp. didn't provide a caller's name because they didn't want to pay the extra money. The price is minimal on a per-call basis - often a penny or less a call - but spread across a telecommunications giant's many customers, it can quickly run into the tens of millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Matthew Hay Brown and Bradley Olson and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | June 20, 2008
WASHINGTON - The White House and senior members of Congress reached a deal yesterday on a long-stalled overhaul of the nation's eavesdropping laws, leaving in place a controversial provision that largely protects telecommunications companies from liability for their roles in past information gathering. The proposal - the most significant revision of the nation's intelligence laws in 30 years - in many ways mirrors the warrantless wiretapping program President Bush secretly began using shortly after the Sept.
BUSINESS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1999
NEW YORK -- Although some companies, including Bell Atlantic Corp., are improving the racial diversity of their operations, NAACP leaders yesterday criticized major hotel and telecommunications companies of failing to adequately hire, promote and contract with minorities.In all, 13 hotels and 15 telecommunications companies were rated.Alltel Corp. of Little Rock, Ark., was awarded an F, the lowest grade for a telecommunications company.The lowest-ranked hotel chain was Omni Hotels, which received a C."
NEWS
October 13, 1999
CONSOLIDATION rather than competition seems the defining dynamic among the nation's largest telecommunications companies. Last week, SBC Communications received federal approval to purchase Ameritech. Hours earlier,MCI Worldcom announced its $115 billion acquisition of Sprint.Buying the competition has become a priority in the new era of communications. The reason is simple: The industry is no longer centered around the telephone.To survive, telecommunications companies must transmit data and video images as well as voice.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
The state's dominant telephone provider does relatively well in hiring, promoting and contracting with African-Americans, according to a score card of telecommunications companies released yesterday by the NAACP.New York-based Bell Atlantic Corp., which rated a B overall, received high marks on hiring blacks nationwide, except in the company's uppermost echelons: corporate officers and members of the board of directors.The company's lowest scores came in spending with black-owned media and black vendors, the report said.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
The state's dominant telephone provider does relatively well in hiring, promoting and contracting with African-Americans, according to a score card of telecommunications companies released yesterday by the NAACP.The New York-based Bell Atlantic Corp., which rated a B overall, received high marks on hiring blacks nationwide, except in the company's uppermost echelons: corporate officers and members of the board of directors. The company's lowest scores came in spending with black-owned media and black vendors, the report said.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2000
Joining the Baltimore harbor's move from factory to high tech, the new owners of the former Coca-Cola plant in Locust Point say they are installing cables and fiber where syrup once flowed in an effort to lure telecommunications companies. The 300,000-square-foot building on Fort Avenue will become offices and a so-called carrier hotel, which would be a home for telecommunications companies planning on entering the local telecom market. It would become a place where they could physically hook into the local network.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2002
Although the nation's wobbly economy is showing signs of strengthening, the telecommunications industry is mired in a deep slump with no end in sight, according to industry experts. Further evidence came this week when Ciena Corp., a Linthicum-based maker of fiber-optic equipment, said that it eliminated 650 employees, or 22 percent of its work force. The company already had slashed 400 workers last month and 380 jobs in November. Combined, the layoffs have reduced Ciena's work force by 38 percent.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Senate rejected Democratic attempts yesterday to scale back expansion of the government's powers to monitor phone calls and e-mail as part of its efforts to fight terrorism. Senators also voted to immunize telecommunications companies from lawsuits for their role in aiding the government's warrantless eavesdropping program. The bill, comprising amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, now goes to the House for a potential showdown. The House version offers no protection for the telecom industry and more restrictions on government power.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Telecommunications companies won a skirmish in the Senate yesterday as a bill to protect them from lawsuits for cooperating with the Bush administration's eavesdropping programs easily overcame a procedural hurdle. The Senate voted 76-10, with Democrats divided, to advance the bill for consideration. A measure to block it, which was led by Sen. Christopher J. Dodd, a Connecticut Democrat, fell short as those who wanted the bill to reach the floor got 16 votes more than the 60 needed to achieve that goal.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush launched an effort yesterday to preserve new spying powers for U.S. intelligence agencies that critics worry could ensnare unwitting American citizens. Bush said restrictions being considered by Congress would leave the country less prepared to combat terrorism. During a visit to the National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, the president said that workers who collect and interpret communications need provisions contained in the Protect America Act, adopted last month, to do their jobs.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 2006
Are you getting your money's worth from caller ID? Some callers can't be identified because their information is blocked or unavailable, but in other cases the callers aren't named because the customer's phone company simply doesn't want to spend the money to obtain the data. A small Boston Globe test of caller ID accuracy found several instances in which Verizon Communications and Comcast Corp. didn't provide a caller's name because they didn't want to pay the extra money. The price is minimal on a per-call basis - often a penny or less a call - but spread across a telecommunications giant's many customers, it can quickly run into the tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 2006
Before last week's report that Qwest Communications was apparently the lone holdout among the four major telecommunications companies secretly supplying the National Security Agency with call records on Americans, the Denver company was often referred to by online grumblers as "the Qworst." Whether or not that reputation had been healed by the company's unexpected (and perhaps overstated) turn as defiant protector of consumer privacy is unclear. A hastily conducted Washington Post-ABC News poll did suggest Friday that 63 percent of Americans thought the NSA program was "an acceptable way to investigate terrorism."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
Members of the General Assembly's ethics committee admonished Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr. yesterday not to sponsor legislation involving his employer's clients after disclosures revealed that he introduced half a dozen bills related to businesses his law firm represents. Giannetti was rebuked during a regular session of the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics yesterday at which Giannetti was told that ethics law prohibits lawmakers from sponsoring bills in which their employer is the only party affected or is a predominant member of the affected group.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Senate rejected Democratic attempts yesterday to scale back expansion of the government's powers to monitor phone calls and e-mail as part of its efforts to fight terrorism. Senators also voted to immunize telecommunications companies from lawsuits for their role in aiding the government's warrantless eavesdropping program. The bill, comprising amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, now goes to the House for a potential showdown. The House version offers no protection for the telecom industry and more restrictions on government power.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Telecommunications companies won a skirmish in the Senate yesterday as a bill to protect them from lawsuits for cooperating with the Bush administration's eavesdropping programs easily overcame a procedural hurdle. The Senate voted 76-10, with Democrats divided, to advance the bill for consideration. A measure to block it, which was led by Sen. Christopher J. Dodd, a Connecticut Democrat, fell short as those who wanted the bill to reach the floor got 16 votes more than the 60 needed to achieve that goal.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 23, 2003
NEW YORK - Former WorldCom Inc. Chief Financial Officer Scott D. Sullivan pleaded innocent yesterday to new charges that he lied on financial statements to secure $4.25 billion in credit for the company. At the same time, his attorney offered a glimpse of his defense strategy, asking a federal judge for permission to subpoena other telecommunications companies. Sullivan is accused of defrauding J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., Bank of America Corp., and other banks of $4.25 billion through improper accounting that hid some of WorldCom's expenses.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
Maryland's largest corporations - including many regulated by state government or doing business with it - are helping pay for Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s inaugural bash, according to documents released yesterday by the inaugural committee. The list of sponsors paying to celebrate Maryland's first Republican governor in 36 years includes prominent Democratic donor and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, and two Democratic state lawmakers. In all, 150 contributors agreed to pay between $1,000 and $20,000 to underwrite tomorrow's gala ball and other events, generating $964,000, documents show.
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