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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
Ken McPeek is the only trainer making waves at Pimlico Race Course this week by shipping in a dog.Everyone loves Blinkers, the 6-year-old black Lab that saunters around the Preakness barn in between scarfing up bran muffins and posing for TV cameras."
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1997
If the Preakness Stakes is Maryland racing's "Animal House," the Pimlico Special is its elegant dinner at the Prime Rib.You'll find the Kentucky Derby winner and a whole lot of shakin' in the Preakness. But in today's Pimlico Special you'll find a field of older horses that could end up being the strongest of any handicap race this year.Skip Away the morning-line fourth choice in a field of eight? That's strong."It's the toughest handicap field we've seen," said Kenny McPeek, trainer of Tejano Run."
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Tejano Run had put up some numbers. The Kentucky-bred chestnut had finished out of the money once in nine lifetime starts and had run an impressive second at the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago.It was no wonder that he was one of the betting favorites for yesterday's 120th running of the Preakness, but Tejano Run didn't run very well -- finishing a disappointing ninth in the 11-horse field.The Derby runner-up got out of the gate slowly and never mounted a serious challenge over the 1 3/16-mile course.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1997
When last seen at Pimlico Race Course two years ago, Tejano Run was running a dull ninth in the Preakness and entering a period in which he was plagued by one injury or illness after another.But he bounced back with a flourish, so trainer Kenny McPeek was ready for the worst yesterday when the chestnut got a leg tangled in a nylon rope at the track's stakes barn area."I was a nervous wreck," said McPeek. "Fortunately, I was holding him myself and it turned out to be very minor. Once he got untangled, everything was fine."
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By BILL TANTON | May 16, 1995
At stall 34 in the Pimlico stakes barn yesterday, Kelly Detray was baring her soul and her left forearm."Look at this," she said with a grimace as she exhibited skin-breaking teeth marks, the souvenir of a bite by Preakness horse Tejano (pronounced tay-HAH-no) Run.An area the size of a baseball on Kelly's arm was already beginning to show discoloration."I'm glad he don't have no top teeth," said the 29-year-old groom. "If he had 'em, I'd be in trouble. Oh, well, I been bit worse than this."
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1995
The last time Ft. Stockton ran, trainer Ben Perkins was experimenting with him on the turf at Keeneland.The colt obviously didn't like the going, stopping to finish seventh after dueling for the early lead in a $39,000 allowance race.But Ft. Stockton was back on dirt in the $50,000-added Hirsch Jacobs Stakes yesterday at Pimlico and he returned to splendid form.In a race full of speedsters, jockey Jerry Bailey bided his time with the Perkins horse, passed pacesetter Cumberland Gap at the head of the stretch and held off a later charge by favored Splendid Splinter.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1997
When last seen at Pimlico Race Course two years ago, Tejano Run was running a dull ninth in the Preakness and entering a period in which he was plagued by one injury or illness after another.But he bounced back with a flourish, so trainer Kenny McPeek was ready for the worst yesterday when the chestnut got a leg tangled in a nylon rope at the track's stakes barn area."I was a nervous wreck," said McPeek. "Fortunately, I was holding him myself and it turned out to be very minor. Once he got untangled, everything was fine."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1997
If the Preakness Stakes is Maryland racing's "Animal House," the Pimlico Special is its elegant dinner at the Prime Rib.You'll find the Kentucky Derby winner and a whole lot of shakin' in the Preakness. But in today's Pimlico Special you'll find a field of older horses that could end up being the strongest of any handicap race this year.Skip Away the morning-line fourth choice in a field of eight? That's strong."It's the toughest handicap field we've seen," said Kenny McPeek, trainer of Tejano Run."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 5, 1997
Gentlemen, the West Coast star trained by Richard Mandella, has been assigned top weight of 122 pounds for the $600,000 Grade I Pimlico Special coming up Saturday at Pimlico.Gentlemen, who carried 123 pounds when third to stablemate Siphon in the Santa Anita Handicap, heads a lineup of 10 still eligible for the 1 3/16-mile handicap race.Gentlemen, a 5-year-old, has not raced since March 2 when he lost to Siphon by three lengths. Before that loss, he won five straight races on the West Coast.
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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Serena's Song, the filly who took on the boys nine days ago in the Kentucky Derby, is headed to Pimlico Race Course.But she won't be running Saturday in the Preakness Stakes.Instead, her owner, Robert Lewis of Newport Beach, Calif., confirmed yesterday what had been rumored at the track for the past couple of days -- Serena's Song will start Friday at Pimlico in the $200,000 Black-Eyed Susan Stakes, which is restricted to 3-year-old fillies.Serena's Song, who set some of the quickest early fractions in Derby history and led until the top of the stretch, also will have a new jockey: Gary Stevens, who won the Kentucky Derby on Thunder Gulch.
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1997
The top three finishers in the Kentucky Derby arrived in Maryland yesterday to begin preparations for the 122nd running of the Preakness Stakes on May 17 at Pimlico Race Course.Their arrival was a welcome reversal from last year, when in the Derby aftermath the winner, Grindstone, was retired and the beaten favorite, Unbridled's Song, withdrawn from the Preakness -- both because of injuries.Yesterday, the seven horses that flew into Baltimore-Washington International Airport signaled to Maryland sports fans the quality and diversity of racing they're about to witness during the next 10 days.
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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 5, 1997
Gentlemen, the West Coast star trained by Richard Mandella, has been assigned top weight of 122 pounds for the $600,000 Grade I Pimlico Special coming up Saturday at Pimlico.Gentlemen, who carried 123 pounds when third to stablemate Siphon in the Santa Anita Handicap, heads a lineup of 10 still eligible for the 1 3/16-mile handicap race.Gentlemen, a 5-year-old, has not raced since March 2 when he lost to Siphon by three lengths. Before that loss, he won five straight races on the West Coast.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Tejano Run had put up some numbers. The Kentucky-bred chestnut had finished out of the money once in nine lifetime starts and had run an impressive second at the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago.It was no wonder that he was one of the betting favorites for yesterday's 120th running of the Preakness, but Tejano Run didn't run very well -- finishing a disappointing ninth in the 11-horse field.The Derby runner-up got out of the gate slowly and never mounted a serious challenge over the 1 3/16-mile course.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
In the Preakness, less can mean more.At least that's the lesson of history that handicappers might want to keep in mind as they pore over their sheets and search for a clue as to who can beat seemingly invincible Team Lukas today, or at least be wheeled with Lukas in the exactas.Seldom has a trainer packed such a one-two Preakness punch.Lukas' horses are Thunder Gulch, a Kentucky Derby winner, and Timber Country, a 2-year-old champion.Together, they cost their owners nearly $1 million, a considerable sum compared with the $6,500 local owner Charles Oliver paid for Maryland-bred Oliver's Twist.
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By JOHN EISENBERG | May 20, 1995
You want this column. You need this column.You're down on your knees in the infield, your best friend has been "gone to the bathroom" for 55 minutes, it's late and you don't have a Preakness bet.Or maybe you're sitting in the grandstand next to a smart aleck from New Jersey who keeps giving you tips that run second and you've realized that you haven't seen your ride home in hours and you don't have a Preakness bet.Don't worry. Everything is going to be fine.The third annual Baltimore Sun Extremely Unofficial Preakness Betting Guide is here.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Kent Baker and Ross Peddicord and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writers | May 20, 1995
Kentucky Derby winner Thunder Gulch is getting no respect -- at least from Maryland bettors in Preakness advance wagering.After a small total of $49,422 was bet on the race yesterday, Thunder Gulch ranks as co-third choice with Derby runner-up Tejano Run at 5-1 odds.But Timber Country, Thunder Gulch's stablemate, is attracting plenty of play. So far, he's the 2-1 favorite.Here's the complete advance run-down:Timber Country, 2-1; Talkin Man, 5-2; Tejano Run, 5-1; Thunder Gulch, 5-1; Oliver's Twist, 8-1; Our Gatsby, 13-1; Mecke, 20-1; Star Standard, 20-1; Mystery Storm, 25-1; Itron, 40-1; and PanaBrass, 60-1.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1997
The top three finishers in the Kentucky Derby arrived in Maryland yesterday to begin preparations for the 122nd running of the Preakness Stakes on May 17 at Pimlico Race Course.Their arrival was a welcome reversal from last year, when in the Derby aftermath the winner, Grindstone, was retired and the beaten favorite, Unbridled's Song, withdrawn from the Preakness -- both because of injuries.Yesterday, the seven horses that flew into Baltimore-Washington International Airport signaled to Maryland sports fans the quality and diversity of racing they're about to witness during the next 10 days.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Thunder Gulch turned "Wayne's World" upside down yesterday in the 121st Kentucky Derby.The muscular colt, a 24-1 shot that trainer D. Wayne Lukas considered the least likely of his three starters to win, stormed to the front at the top of the stretch at Churchill Downs and with another quarter of a mile to go, held off all comers in the fastest Derby in 10 years.Lukas watched as Serena's Song, the filly that he trains and was the lone female in the 19-horse field, wilted and finished 16th after setting a quick early pace that left her exhausted.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
Activity at Pimlico's Preakness barn was to be stepped up considerably today when a planeload of at least 13 horses, including five starteres in the Preakness, arrives at BWI Airport from Standiford Field in Louisville, Ky.Included in the shipment is Kentucky Derby winner Thunder Gulch, as well as his two D. Wayne Lukas-trained stablemates, Timber Country and Serena's Song.Track oddsmaker Clem Florio is ranking Thunder Gulch, sent off at 24-1 odds in the Derby, as the 2-1 Preakness favorite.
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