Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTehran
IN THE NEWS

Tehran

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Our man Brody keeps everyone guessing right up through the end of this episode. Carrie, however, shows again that she cannot be fooled. Yelling across the globe through a cell phone, Carrie stakes her claim: “I've always been right about Brody!” Whatever her flaws (and they are numerous), she has always been right about Brody. Or has she? The action takes place in Tehran, where Brody is on a top-secret CIA mission to assassinate General Akbari, the head of Iran's Revolutionary Guard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Schwartz | July 13, 2014
With the meteoric rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), the United States and Iran find themselves in the peculiar position of seeing their strategic goals fall into step. It is in the interest of neither country to witness the emergence of an unstable Iraq, least of all one that serves as a safe haven for Sunni extremists to harass Iranian and American interests in the region. The alignment of American and Iranian strategic interests, which last significantly occurred with the unseating of the Taliban in 2001, should not merely be viewed as a fleeting moment in which coordination - or even cooperation - between the two countries is possible.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 3, 2012
The muted communication from a spokesperson for the Navy's Fifth Fleet that it won't tolerate an Iranian attempt to close to Strait of Hormuz and shut off much of the world's oil supply is not an adequate response to the threat. It comes off as another sign of an apathetic, apologetic U.S. foreign policy ("Iran warns U.S. over Strait of Hormuz," Dec. 29). Why does it always seem that President Obama is out of town when we need him? We see him getting ice cream with his family, which is very touching.
ENTERTAINMENT
Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Our man Brody keeps everyone guessing right up through the end of this episode. Carrie, however, shows again that she cannot be fooled. Yelling across the globe through a cell phone, Carrie stakes her claim: “I've always been right about Brody!” Whatever her flaws (and they are numerous), she has always been right about Brody. Or has she? The action takes place in Tehran, where Brody is on a top-secret CIA mission to assassinate General Akbari, the head of Iran's Revolutionary Guard.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 17, 2004
VIENNA, Austria - Iran threatened yesterday to resume enrichment of uranium - a prerequisite for making nuclear weapons - if the International Atomic Energy Agency passes an expected resolution rebuking it for not cooperating. Iran's president, Mohammad Khatami, said his country no longer had a "moral commitment" to suspend uranium enrichment, though he added that it had not made a decision to restart such work. "If the draft resolution proposed by the European countries is approved by the IAEA, Iran will reject it," Khatami said in Tehran.
NEWS
December 16, 1997
THE SUMMIT conference of the Organization of the Islamic Conference in Tehran was a triumph for its revolutionary regime, mocking Washington's fantasy of isolating Iran.Egypt's presence gave that U.S. client its closest relations with revolutionary Iran since it granted asylum to the fleeing shah in 1979. The visit of Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia heals relations despite private Saudi accusations of Iranian-sponsored terrorism. Saddam Hussein of Iraq brought an architectural model of what he claims will be the world's largest mosque, to be named for himself, revisiting the country he invaded in 1980.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 19, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - A student demonstration in support of a popular reformist professor who has been sentenced to die for blaspheming Islam turned bloody yesterday when extremists supporting Iran's theocracy clashed with the students at Tehran's Sharif University. One student speaker suffered a cracked skull and cuts and was carried off by friends during the attack by roughly 500 members of the hard-line militia group Ansareh Hezbollah, or Friends of the Party of God, witnesses said. A number of other students also were injured.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2008
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates -- President Bush called Iran "the world's leading state sponsor of terror" and sought yesterday to shore up opposition to the government in Tehran throughout the Middle East. But even as he criticized Iranian leaders, saying they were seeking to repress their own citizens and to cow neighboring countries, Bush appealed to U.S. allies in the region to open up their own political and economic systems to greater democracy. Iran, meanwhile, promised the head of the United Nation's nuclear watchdog agency yesterday that it will answer all remaining questions about its past nuclear activities within four weeks, including secret activities the United States suspects were linked to a weapons program.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Despite American concerns about Iran's suspected nuclear-weapons program, President Bush faces powerful diplomatic and military obstacles in trying to influence Tehran's nuclear ambitions. After U.S. forces toppled Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq, many in Washington hoped that Iran's leaders had taken away this message: The United States was back in the Middle East and Persian Gulf in force, determined to confront governments that maintained ties with terrorists and sought to acquire weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iranian officials called U.S. accusations that it is arming Shiite militias in Iraq with tank-piercing explosives "unfounded" yesterday, and insisted that Iran is committed to joining a regional effort to halt the tightening spiral of violence. But the back-and-forth charges between Tehran and Washington highlight a growing recognition of Iran's substantial influence on its next-door neighbor and its ability, if nothing else, to prevent the U.S. from untangling the political conflicts that have plunged Iraq into mounting sectarian warfare.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 26, 2013
Seeking to create an analogy with the deal the United States negotiated with Iran to supposedly limit further production of its centrifuges, Secretary of State John Kerry chose to recall disarmament agreements between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. A better analogy would be the 1938 Munich Pact, which gave Hitler part of Czechoslovakia in the vain hope that war could be avoided. It is worth noting that several of the nations that were signatories in Munich - namely Germany, France and Britain - are also part of the current deal with Iran.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
President Barack Obama's critics lost no time in calling him naive for welcoming talks offered by Iran's president aimed at reducing tensions between their two countries over Tehran's disputed nuclear program. Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu was outspoken in his disdain for the diplomatic initiative launched at the United Nations last month by Iranian President Hasan Rowhani, calling him a wolf in sheep's clothing who only wants to bargain in order to buy more time for Iran to build a bomb.
NEWS
By Mitchell Reiss | June 3, 2013
The plight of the organized resistance to the regime in Iran, particularly the violent persecution of the group known as the Mujahedeen e-Khalq (MEK/PMOI), has been one of the great, untold stories in international politics. It is a story of deadly betrayal, broken promises and political expediency. And that's just on the U.S. side. Over several decades, the group was opposed to the corrupt military dictatorship of the Shah and was instrumental in the revolution that saw the end to monarchy in Iran.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Speculation in Israel about the possibility of a strike on Iran's nuclear program in the coming weeks has intensified, and not just because of Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney's tough talk in Jerusalem. Mr. Romney called for the U.S. and Israel to use "any and all measures" to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons - a position repeated virtually verbatim by U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta when he visited Israel a few days later. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said this week that "time to resolve this peacefully is running out," even as theU.S.
NEWS
By Alireza Jafarzadeh | April 16, 2012
After a yearlong round of escalating international economic sanctions and rhetoric, the regime in Iran has finally come around to raising expectations that it will take some constructive steps in reining in its nuclear weapons ambitions. But this cycle of threat and accommodation has played out before, and its outcome should have been predictable. According to the information provided by Iranian dissidents obtained from their sources inside the regime, as well as the U.N.'s atomic watchdog agency, the nuclear genie is out of the bottle in Iran, and the regime's genius for delay and subterfuge will only give it the time to complete the dash to a workable weapon.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | April 3, 2012
Not long ago, an astute reader noted that it has been nearly two years since I wrote in a column that "most experts now estimate that Iran needs about 18 months to complete a nuclear device and a missile to carry it. " His point - that those estimates were way off - was a good one, especially since experts are still estimating that Iran is 18 months away from being able to build a nuclear weapon. So what gives? Why does Iran always seem to be about 18 months away from a nuclear bomb, at least in the eyes of U.S. officials?
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | July 2, 2008
UNITED NATIONS - Iran's senior diplomat said yesterday that Tehran is seriously considering a new offer from six world powers to resolve the dispute over its nuclear program. He called the offer "constructive." The unusually positive remarks by Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki to a small group of reporters raised hope that a negotiated solution can be found to defuse the crisis. The U.N. Security Council has demanded that Iran suspend the enrichment of uranium that can be used for nuclear weapons, and the Bush administration has refused direct talks with Iran until it meets that condition.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran - In a potential major political shift in Iran, a political rival to Iran's president was elected by an overwhelming majority as speaker of the Parliament yesterday. The new speaker, Ali Larijani, Iran's former chief nuclear negotiator, is viewed by the West as a moderating influence in Tehran. The role of parliamentary speaker is a powerful position in Iranian politics, and analysts said Larijani could use it to challenge the president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, against whom Larijani ran for president in 2005.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
We should expect a horrific human toll from any exchange of hostilities between Iran and Israel ("Nuclear saber-rattling," Jan. 6). Steps toward avoiding that, such as your editorial call for an intricate U.S.-Tehran agreement, are morally well-intentioned. But it wouldn't disturb our rest if these were Buddhist monks developing nuclear power for Nepal. Why not? Because common sense says their benign intentions are trustworthy and they respect human life. The Tehran mullahs have rebuffed (to say the least)
NEWS
February 6, 2012
The threat of an Israeli strike against Iran'snuclear facilities ratcheted up a notch last week when Israel'sdefense minister, Ehud Barak, issued new warnings that time was running out to stop Tehran's drive to build a bomb. If Israel waits much longer, Mr. Barak told a security conference in Jerusalem, it would no longer have the option of destroying the Iranian weapons program before it disappeared into newly constructed mountain bunkers where it would be invulnerable to attack. Israel's escalating rhetoric is understandable: The nation's leaders have good reason to fear a nuclear-armed Iran would act on its vows to destroy the Jewish state.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.