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July 29, 1991
Who: Nancy and Larry FittonAges: 38 and 44 respectivelyFrom: Long GreenAssignment: Honduras, 1976-79Larry taught photography at Pan American Agricultural School, known as Zamorano. Nancy taught nutrition to village women, produced audio-visual materials and conducted workshops for auxiliary nurses in the capital, Tegucigalpa.Update: She earned master's in international health at Johns Hopkins and later worked for Pan American Health Organization and World Vision in Costa Rica before becoming full-time mother to their three children.
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NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | February 22, 2005
`DUTIFUL" IS A word this newspaper used Sunday to describe John Dimitri Negroponte, the 65-year-old career diplomat President Bush named last week to be the first director of national intelligence. It was in an editorial that otherwise had little good to say about the man, and I think the word best characterizes the image that comes to mind when Mr. Negroponte is mentioned. He is a dutiful servant. One thinks of him as America's representative to the United Nations, sitting dutifully behind Colin L. Powell as the secretary of state testified incorrectly about the threat Iraq posed to the world.
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NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | February 22, 2005
`DUTIFUL" IS A word this newspaper used Sunday to describe John Dimitri Negroponte, the 65-year-old career diplomat President Bush named last week to be the first director of national intelligence. It was in an editorial that otherwise had little good to say about the man, and I think the word best characterizes the image that comes to mind when Mr. Negroponte is mentioned. He is a dutiful servant. One thinks of him as America's representative to the United Nations, sitting dutifully behind Colin L. Powell as the secretary of state testified incorrectly about the threat Iraq posed to the world.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | June 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush's nominee as ambassador to the United Nations, John D. Negroponte, is one of the more impressive products of the Foreign Service. He has served as ambassador to Mexico and the Philippines. He speaks five languages, and as a young man resigned quietly as a key assistant to National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger because he believed Mr. Kissinger was misleading the American people about the terms of the agreements that ended the U.S. war in Vietnam. Now he will almost certainly be called a war criminal - or at least a Cold War criminal - during his confirmation hearings before the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | June 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush's nominee as ambassador to the United Nations, John D. Negroponte, is one of the more impressive products of the Foreign Service. He has served as ambassador to Mexico and the Philippines. He speaks five languages, and as a young man resigned quietly as a key assistant to National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger because he believed Mr. Kissinger was misleading the American people about the terms of the agreements that ended the U.S. war in Vietnam. Now he will almost certainly be called a war criminal - or at least a Cold War criminal - during his confirmation hearings before the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As part of its investigation into military officers accused of murdering civilians during the 1980s, Honduras asked the State Department and Central Intelligence Agency yesterday to release records about their involvement in the military's activities, especially those of a secret intelligence unit.The Honduran attorney general's office submitted the request to the U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, asking for detailed information about U.S. ties with Gen. Gustavo Alvarez Martinez, who, as former chief of the Honduran armed forces, directed the secret intelligence group responsible for the kidnapping, torture and murder hundreds of alleged subversives.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 1997
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Democracy is wearing a little thin in Honduras.After 16 years of civilian rule, the mere fact of being able to vote for their president today is no longer enough for the citizens of this Central American nation. They want real change and are becoming impatient with their political system's inability to provide it quickly enough."Without resolving the needs of the poorest, the nation is heading toward ungovernability and confrontation," warned the Roman Catholic Church's weekly newspaper Fides.
NEWS
September 23, 1994
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- The Honduran government ordered army troops into the streets of the country's cities yesterday to combat a crime wave.President Carlos Reina's move followed a surge in bank holdups and armed robberies of businesses and residences in Honduran cities.Mr. Reina, elected in November on a campaign promise to roll back the army's influence in political affairs, has clashed with armed forces chiefs over a number of policy moves.The army, which controls the police, ruled Honduras for 20 years before ceding formal control of the government to civilians in 1990.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 13, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- A trial of the 10 military officers indicted last month on charges of kidnapping and torturing six students during the 1980s remains at least a month away, pending a review of the government's evidence by two criminal court judges and their decision as to whether to allow the prosecution to proceed.The judges are interviewing the government's witnesses and visiting the buildings that were used as clandestine jails by Battalion 316, the secret intelligence unit trained by the CIA and which has been held responsible for many of the human rights abuses committed by the military.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Leo Valladares, a Honduran human rights investigator, said yesterday that a Honduran military commander, Gen. Luis Discua, told him in late 1993 that at the request of the CIA he created a Honduran military unit found to have kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected subversives in the 1980s.At a meeting at the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa, Valladares said, Discua "held up a file [and] said: 'If I created Battalion 316, it's because I was asked to do so by the CIA.' "Valladares was testifying before a congressional committee on legislation that would speed the declassification of material requested by Latin American and Caribbean "truth commissions" that seek to uncover Cold War misdeeds by military leaders.
FEATURES
July 29, 1991
Who: Nancy and Larry FittonAges: 38 and 44 respectivelyFrom: Long GreenAssignment: Honduras, 1976-79Larry taught photography at Pan American Agricultural School, known as Zamorano. Nancy taught nutrition to village women, produced audio-visual materials and conducted workshops for auxiliary nurses in the capital, Tegucigalpa.Update: She earned master's in international health at Johns Hopkins and later worked for Pan American Health Organization and World Vision in Costa Rica before becoming full-time mother to their three children.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
A medical team will take 1,000 doses of anti-tetanus vaccine and medical supplies from New Windsor to storm-ravaged Central America tomorrow.Tetanus toxoids, water purification kits, and anti-cholera medicines are included in the 70-pound medicine boxes that a New Windsor-based relief agency -- Interchurch Medical Assistance Inc. -- is sending to Honduras and Nicaragua to aid victims of Hurricane Mitch.In the past two weeks, the agency and another New Windsor relief group -- Emergency Response Service Ministries, the disaster relief arm of Church of the Brethren -- have provided $3 million in aid to Honduras.
NEWS
By Alex Renderos and Hictor Tobar and Alex Renderos and Hictor Tobar,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2007
San Pedro Sula, Honduras -- Hurricane Felix came ashore on Nicaragua's remote Miskito Coast early yesterday as a Category 5 storm, damaging about 5,000 homes in the region before moving west toward the heart of this country of 7 million people, officials said. Less than 12 hours later and more than 1,600 miles away in the Pacific, a second and much weaker hurricane, Henriette, struck the resort city of San Jose del Cabo on the southern tip of Baja California. The center of Henriette's eye reached the Baja mainland yesterday afternoon about six miles east of San Jose del Cabo's downtown.
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