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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2009
theater 'I Am My Own Wife': Actor Bruce Nelson portrays 35 characters in this one-man show about Berlin's controversial Tranny Granny, or Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, who navigated two homophobic regimes in a housecoat and high heels. I Am My Own Wife runs through Feb. 22 at Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $24-$38. Call 410-752-2208 or go to everymantheatre.org. Mary Carole McCauley art School 33 exhibit: Politics, conformity and assimilation are themes in the work of Eun Woo Cho and Liz Ensz, the artists featured in a Two Person Juried Exhibition that runs through Feb. 7 at School 33 Art Center, 1427 Light St. Andrea Pollan, head of the Curator's Office gallery in Washington, served as the juror for the exhibit, part of School 33's Open Call to Artists.
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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | January 12, 2009
A while ago, blog reader Michelle asked for help for a teething baby. I asked Dr. Daniel Levy, a pediatrician who chairs the oral health task force for the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, for his tips. Here's what he wrote back: "Teething, or the eruption of the first (deciduous, or 'milk,' teeth) commonly occurs in infants in the period between 4 months and 18 months, with the average around 6-12 months. The bottom two teeth (lower incisors) tend to erupt first, followed by the middle or lateral upper incisors.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Washington - "She's not what you expect as the lead in Twilight," says Kristen Stewart, of, really, herself, playing Bella Swan, the high school girl who falls in love with a vampire, Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson), in the movie adaptation of Stephenie Meyer's best-selling novel (opening Friday nationwide). "She's not your typical damsel in distress. She really is a woman."
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Baltomommie wrote to ask for advice on how to help her preschooler stop grinding his teeth at night. She also wanted to know whether a sealant that dentists apply to children's teeth these days to prevent cavities would help protect his teeth from the wear and tear of grinding. I sent the question to Shari Kohn, a pediatric dentist at Dentistry for Kids in Hunt Valley and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School. She counsels patience. "Many preschoolers grind their teeth," she wrote in an e-mail.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE | October 22, 2008
Describe the transition from guard to center for you. You have a lot of responsibilities, like knowing the defenses and making the offensive line calls. On top of that, it's twice as hard having to learn a new offense under [offensive coordinator] Cam Cameron. He has a very in-depth playbook. What is one of the more challenging aspects of your role? At tackle [which Brown played during his freshman year at North Carolina], the defensive lineman is several feet away from you. At center, he's about 5 inches away from you. They can crowd the ball, and that makes a big difference because you're at the point of attack, and everything happens very quickly at the center position.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 19, 2008
The fun of Ghost Town starts with the title and doesn't end until the final line. In fact, the ending, in its own milder way, is as perfect as "nobody's perfect" in Some Like It Hot. In this movie, New York City is the ghost town, and not because everyone has left it, as in I Am Legend. Without even knowing it, surviving friends and loved ones, because of their unresolved emotions, keep a horde of dead Manhattanites tethered to Earth. As the dentist who discovers he can converse with the dead, Ricky Gervais gives the film a rich, bittersweet center.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 23, 2008
You give your rambunctious toddler a nice soapy bath, and what's the first thing he does? He goes out and stomps in the mud, of course. It was no different this week for Samson, the 5-month-old African elephant at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. No sooner had keeper Marsha Zabarkes scrubbed him down with suds and a stiff brush and hosed him off than the busy 590-pound infant scampered off and immediately stepped in his mother's dung. Nice.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | April 28, 2008
About 12 years ago, Carrie Lemon started losing teeth. One by one, to curb pain, Lemon had most of her teeth extracted. Today, at 72, she has only six left. Eating has become a daily chore, and Lemon wants desperately to be fitted for a set of dentures. "I've just been going from one dentist to another, but all of them tell me that our medical system doesn't cover it," Lemon said. "I don't have the money to get them."
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 12, 2008
Let's face it: Ice hockey has been a tough sell in Washington, particularly since the lockout. In 2005-06, the first year back, the Capitals ranked 28th out of 30 NHL teams in average attendance. Last season, they were No. 27. This year through 20 games, they're No. 29, averaging 13,642. The franchises in Columbus, Ohio, and Nashville, Tenn., do better with teams that, like the Caps, are treading water. Yet, Washington just gave 22-year-old superstar Alex Ovechkin a 13-year, $124 million extension.
FEATURES
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
The closest thing China has to a tooth fairy might be Dwayne Arola, an engineering professor from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who has a thing for Asian choppers. Not long ago, Arola returned from a trip to Shanghai with a plastic lunch box containing a dozen prime specimens from Chinese dental patients - large, cavity-free wisdom teeth - destined to endure a regimen of abuse that he once reserved for aircraft parts. How the Chinese molars hold up under Arola's stress tests may explain why Chinese teeth are more brittle than American teeth.
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