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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumor that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy's brain. The tumor was found in the then-4-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that appeared this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery could someday help researchers trying to cure diseases or grow new organs, medical experts said.
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FEATURES
By Stokely Baksh, For The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Eight months and one week. That's how long it took my daughter, Sarla, to get her first tooth. And the teething started the day we took a seven-hour flight across the pond to Europe. A first for her, a first for me, just one of several new firsts for my family of three, which inevitably made for a memorable trip. In June, my husband and I took our daughter to Denmark, home of Hans Christian Andersen and his famous fairy tales, amusement parks, hot dog buns with holes in them and cold Carlsberg beer and bicycles wherever you go. We knew early on in parenthood that we'd be those brave parents that would board planes, ride trains, go on long car rides, refusing to stay in the confinements of our home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
On Tuesday, the latest release from Baltimore emo act Pianos Become the Teeth was released digitally. It is a split 7" with Touche Amore, the excellent post-hardcore act from Los Angeles. The record is also Pianos' first release since "The Lack Long After," its sophomore album from November 2011. You can stream both songs here . Pianos' contribution, "Hiding," can be streamed above. It is a noticeable leap forward, not because vocalist Kyle Durfey sings more than he screams, but because he sounds surprisingly great doing so. This makes for another new, exciting development: His lyrics, an asset for the quintet, can be deciphered with (relative)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Yesterday, writing about Ammon Shea's Bad English , I encouraged peevers to examine their consciences. Well, I've had a look at mine, and it isn't pretty.  One of the peeves he describes and explodes is the prejudice against fun  as an adjective. "It's a noun !" peevers shout. Well, though Dr. Johnson called it "a low cant word," fun  (a verb among thieves before it was a noun) has been used as an adjective since the nineteenth century.  As it moved from mere adjective in the sense that no one objects to ("The party was fun")
NEWS
June 20, 2012
Regarding Dan Rodricks ' column on Wall Street and dental insurance, he seems to think that everyone who invests in the stock market and Wall Street is wealthy and can carry the economy, health care and a multitude of other liberal causes ("Wall Street pays, the nation smiles," June 17). I am invested in Wall Street, and I am not wealthy by a long shot. I invest because the return on bank savings and other institutions is paltry and does not cover inflation. Mr. Rodricks should take another look at Wall Street.
NEWS
February 9, 2012
Children need protection from adults who sexually abuse them, and adults should report abuse when they suspect it ("A better way to help kids," Feb. 6). It should be as simple as that. But although Maryland law requires everyone to report suspected cases of abuse - not just educators, health practitioners and social workers - unlike 47 other states, there is no penalty for failure to meet this important obligation. Those of us on the front lines in investigating child abuse cases see a need for significant penalties for failing to report child abuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
There's a moment from Kyle Durfey's adolescence that has always stayed with him. He was sitting next to his dad in their Crofton home, watching the sci-fi movie "Contact. " In the film, Jodie Foster's character sees her long-deceased father walk up to her on a beach in space. "I'll be damned," Gordon Durfey said to himself, just loud enough for his son to hear him. The significance wasn't lost on the teenager: Durfey realized his dad was imagining meeting his father again. It's a feeling Durfey knows well now. "The Lack Long After," the second album from Durfey's Baltimore screamo band Pianos Become the Teeth released in November on Topshelf Records, is about the death of Durfey's dad, who died of pneumonia in April 2010.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | October 28, 2005
Sometimes an idea is so simple, it's overlooked - until a child gets involved. Puneet Nanda, an entrepreneur in Los Angeles, hit upon the Fire Fly Toothbrush after playing games with his young daughter to get her to brush her teeth for the correct length of time. He figured that she liked her flashing tennis shoes so much, why not put a time-activated blinking light on the brush? A fad was born. Today, the Fire Fly Toothbrush is the leading toothbrush sold nationwide at Target stores.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- Yekaterina Tkalenko brushes her teeth three or four times a day - especially after drinking enamel-insulting tea or coffee - has them professionally cleaned twice a year and carries floss as if it were as vital as an inhaler. She recently spent nearly $1,000 to have her teeth whitened. "When I look at a person, no matter who it is, the first thing I look at is his or her teeth and their smile," said the 34-year-old Muscovite, who works in the tourist industry. "When I see good teeth, I think this person has more chances in life, and he'll be more successful than a person who has bad teeth."
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 31, 1991
Chocolate, chewing gum and red licorice are not as bad for your teeth as you thought.But the bad news: Bread, bananas, raisins, cereals and chips are probably worse, according to the latest dental research."
FEATURES
April 2, 2014
Q: I've seen amber necklaces for babies that are intended to ease teething pain. Does this remedy work? Is it safe? A: Infants and toddlers are developmentally primed to put objects of curiosity into their mouths, so pediatricians worry about small objects that could enter the respiratory tract and cause breathing difficulties or choking. Vendors of the necklaces claim that Baltic amber contains succinic acid, which when released in response to body temperature, they purport, has analgesic benefits.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumor that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy's brain. The tumor was found in the then-4-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that appeared this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery could someday help researchers trying to cure diseases or grow new organs, medical experts said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 24, 2013
Baltimore city , Baltimore County and Prince George's County have been directed by the state to step up their efforts to reduce polluted runoff fouling local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. But environmental groups contend the mandates are too vague and weak, raising the possibility they may go to court to challenge them. The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered the three large jurisdictions to take a variety of similar actions over the next five years to curtail storm-water pollution, including reducing litter in water ways and retrofitting 20 percent of their streets, parking lots and buildings to catch or treat runoff.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
After losing her job as a teacher, Guernica Williams tried for months to get her bank to modify the mortgages on her Windsor Mills home. When her unemployment insurance ended in 2012 and she defaulted, she kept trying, leaving voice mails for a changing roster of case managers and repeatedly submitting documents. In September, she met with a Wells Fargo representative at a court-administered mediation session, where she received assurances that the bank would review her loan, if she submitted additional documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
Janell Sutherland and For The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Let's bypass all the shenanigans and get real, shall we? It's the penultimate night of "The Amazing Race," four teams are left and cobras are on the menu. Tastes like snake-ish chicken Still in Indonesia, teams are sent from the Pit Stop to King Cobra House for their next clue. They are told they'll each have to eat a serving of a local dish. They all depart within 20 minutes of each other, but Tim and Marie's cab driver drops them off at the wrong entrance to the area. In their cab, Leo wonders if they'll have to eat a snake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Back from Tribal Council, Vytas is perfectly grateful and softspoken about being kept, and the women are eating it right up. He doesn't mean it, but he's playing this perfectly. As long as he doesn't turn into a jerk later, I would be perfectly alright with him winning. They talk about their alliance of five, and Tina makes the mistake of letting Monica know that she's No. 5. Monica admits that it's going to be hard not to accept an offer better than fifth when the tribes merge, and she should.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | November 11, 2001
What's so great about an ugly set of dentures made with a lead base plugged with human teeth and dingy fabrications fashioned from cow teeth and elephant ivory? 1. They belonged to George Washington. 2. Curators at the Mount Vernon homestead never wanted the public to see them there. Until now. Mount Vernon's director, James Rees, explained the museum's recent decision to make an unusual exception to its toothless policy: Mount Vernon has had these dentures since 1949, but never set them out until now. What gives?
NEWS
By JUDY FORMAN | October 28, 2005
How often can you safely whiten your teeth? It's not fully clear, but once or twice a year seems to cause no problems, said Dr. Dan Nathanson, chair of the department of restorative sciences and biomaterials at the Boston University School of Dental Medicine. "No one has shown categorically that there is a danger in doing it too much, but we are cautious. It's probably not good to be a whitening addict," he said. The basic ingredient in tooth-whitening gels, whether administered in a dentist's office or at home, is hydrogen peroxide, which penetrates both the porous enamel on the outside of the tooth and the inner layer of dentin, lightening the tooth as it goes.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
The mother of a Howard County teenager who died after dental surgery wants to see all pediatric dental procedures that use general anesthesia take place in hospitals someday. But for now, Cathy Garger hopes to shed light on dangers surrounding routine dental visits that she believes led to the death of her daughter, 17-year-old Jennifer Michelle "Jenny" Olenick, and other pediatric patients. Olenick, a junior at Marriotts Ridge High School, died in April 2011, 10 days after losing oxygen during a wisdom tooth extraction procedure at an oral surgeon's Columbia office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@patuxent.com | March 3, 2013
Good God this show is depressing. It's fun to look at dead bodies and blood and guts a little bit, but then you throw in all the nihilistic conversation and abandoned long distance hikers and by the end of the episode you're just like ._. This episode was kind of a departure from the norm because it didn't really address the Woodbury-Prison storyline at all, and it really only featured four characters: Rick, Carl, Michonne and ... Morgan!...
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