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Teen Pregnancy

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By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
On television, a baby wails uncontrollably. "If you get pregnant," the commercial's narrator says, "this is what the rest of your teen-age years will sound like. You can go farther when you don't go all the way."On billboards, 10-foot-high letters in spray-painted graffiti spell "VIRGIN," above the words, "Teach your kid it's not a dirty word."In classrooms, posters depict the hard realities of adolescent pregnancy in graphic terms. One shows a young man cradling an infant. "A baby costs $474 a month.
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NEWS
April 26, 2014
One only has to take a look at the story about the death of 14-year-old Najee Thomas in Cherry Hill and have lived in the inner city to understand the circumstances ( "In Cherry Hill, shooting takes a good friend's life," April 23). Reporter Justin George could have delved further into the history of Cherry Hill which, by the way, is nothing like its name. Predominantly African-American, the community has a long history of drugs, violence and an unstable home environment. What can we expect from generations after generation of people raised by single parents (if lucky)
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NEWS
April 23, 2012
In her commentary on teen pregnancy ("Teen pregnancy is poverty's offspring," April 16), Susan Reimer perpetuates the justification that poverty is the primary reason teens engage in sex and become pregnant. This begs the question: Why, when we have always had poverty, did we not see the rate of unwed teen mothers in the past that we witness today? I grew up in a section of Baltimore City that had its share of immigrants, blue collar workers and other individuals who would be considered poor by today's standards.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
The Sun's recent editorial regarding student testing ("Md. should skip the MSA," Sept. 17) offered thought-provoking insight, yielding additional perspective. Citizens are already advised that test scores will flatten next year as they did this year. No Child Left Behind has been underfunded, students may not be taught Maryland School Assessment material but will receive MSA testing, and the Core Curriculum asks teachers to teach critical thinking without specific guidelines as to how to do so. Education majors study lesson planning, not curriculum development and implementation, although their teacher evaluations and their jobs will depend on teaching Core Curriculum well.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 16, 2012
There is good news - and some familiar bad news - in recent research into the stubborn question of why our babies have babies when it is such a spectacularly bad idea for both mother and child. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week that teen births have hit an all-time low. In 2010, there were 34.4 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 19, a 9 percent drop from the year before. What makes this news even more welcome is that the birthrate among teens ticked up in the mid-2000s after 20 years of declines, and researchers were at a loss to explain why. Researchers are cautiously attributing the decrease to the public service campaigns that urge kids to delay sex for a while, and then to use contraceptives the first time and every time.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
Hal and Chuck Donofrio deserve the praise they received for their innovative media program to reduce unwanted teen pregnancy ("Abstinence with an attitude," Sept. 9). Their efforts began with an ideologically bipartisan effort of state legislators. Two pro-life lawmakers, state Sen. Frank Kelly and Del. Timothy Maloney, joined two pro-choice members, Sen, Catherine Riley and myself, to advocate for increased funding for family planning and counseling services, expanded adoption efforts and a television ad campaign that tells teens "it's OK to say no. " Nearly two-thirds of the members of the General Assembly signed our letter to former Gov. Harry Hughes urging him to fund an "historic legislative budget request.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 11, 2010
Those who remember the Academy Award-winning documentary "Scared Straight," which showed a group of lifers from New Jersey's Rahway State Prison terrifying a bunch of cocky juvenile delinquent boys with tales of jailhouse horror, will understand when I say that MTV's "16 and Pregnant" is the chick version. The show follows teen girls who find themselves pregnant — from the pregnancy test all the way to the delivery room and home again with baby — and it includes graphic scenes of pain, both physical and emotional.
NEWS
By Harriet Meyer | September 19, 1994
POLICY PLANNERS and government officials have been spending enormous amounts of energy devising new programs to prevent teen pregnancy as part of recent welfare reform proposals.The challenge to the planners is stark, about 357,000 children were born to unmarried teen-agers in 1990. To create effective pregnancy prevention programs, planners must take into account the range of sexual and emotional experiences that can lead an adolescent to early, unplanned parenthood.Absent from the teen-pregnancy debate has been any discussion of the critical role played by childhood sexual abuse.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | June 15, 2011
When it comes to teens having babies, it's a matter of pay me now or pay me later. You can pay for the programs that help teens understand sex and make good decisions about it, and you can pay for the health care services that provide them with options for contraception. Or you can pay for the misfortunes that are more likely to befall the child of a teen mother: health problems, behavioral and educational issues, and a greater likelihood of criminal troubles in adolescence and young adulthood.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | September 19, 1993
A few years ago Bronwyn W. Mayden was cooking dinner when her son, then 6, came running inside with an urgent question: "Mom, what is sex?"As executive director of the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy, Ms. Mayden was earning her living by talking to parents and young people about sex. So how did she respond?"
NEWS
September 13, 2013
Hal and Chuck Donofrio deserve the praise they received for their innovative media program to reduce unwanted teen pregnancy ("Abstinence with an attitude," Sept. 9). Their efforts began with an ideologically bipartisan effort of state legislators. Two pro-life lawmakers, state Sen. Frank Kelly and Del. Timothy Maloney, joined two pro-choice members, Sen, Catherine Riley and myself, to advocate for increased funding for family planning and counseling services, expanded adoption efforts and a television ad campaign that tells teens "it's OK to say no. " Nearly two-thirds of the members of the General Assembly signed our letter to former Gov. Harry Hughes urging him to fund an "historic legislative budget request.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 9, 2013
From graffiti on buses ("Virgin. Teach your kids it's not a dirty world") to posters of chickens in tennis shoes ("What do you call a guy who makes a baby, then flies the coop?") to the heart-rending pleas of real teens ("Mom. Dad. Talk to me. I need you now. "), Baltimore's Campaign for Our Children has for a quarter century brought the polished skills of Madison Avenue to the problem of teen pregnancy. Through its symbiotic relationship with the successful ad agency Richardson, Myers and Donofrio, now Carton Donofrio Partners, the campaign was also able to leverage the agency's media relationships into free space on buses and billboards and free time on the airwaves.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 1, 2013
It is no longer teenagers stumbling into pregnancy and parenthood about whom we should be fretting. Those numbers continue to drop, because the kids are having less sex and using more contraception. No, it is the 20-something women who are putting babies before marriage at a frightening rate - and not because they don't know any better. They are sure the good man and the picket fence are out of reach, but they still want children. Why wait for what they don't think will happen? That's the picture painted by a new study, "Knot Yet: The benefits and costs of delayed marriage in America," prepared by researchers at the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and the Relate Institute.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 4, 2013
We are pretty sure of our stereotypes in this country, and we hold them close. One of them is that teen pregnancy is an inner-city problem, a poor problem, a black problem. Another is that "rural" equals "farm," and life there is wholesome and God-fearing. Like so many of the things we believe to be true, these aren't. Not exactly. New research from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy reveals that the teen birth rate is a third higher in rural counties than in other areas of the country, regardless of age, race or ethnicity.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Leave it to some thoughtful physicians to put good medicine ahead of good politics. Last year, the Obama administration wrongly chose to limit access of teens to the emergency contraceptive pill known as Plan B. This week, pediatricians are urging their fellow doctors to do something that should help correct that error. In a position paper released Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that doctors prescribe Plan B to girls under the age of 17 regardless of whether they are sexually active - or have some "Plan A" contraceptive in place such as birth control pills.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
In her commentary on teen pregnancy ("Teen pregnancy is poverty's offspring," April 16), Susan Reimer perpetuates the justification that poverty is the primary reason teens engage in sex and become pregnant. This begs the question: Why, when we have always had poverty, did we not see the rate of unwed teen mothers in the past that we witness today? I grew up in a section of Baltimore City that had its share of immigrants, blue collar workers and other individuals who would be considered poor by today's standards.
NEWS
February 6, 1992
Throughout Baltimore City, a new and rather arresting image has been plastered on billboards: the word VIRGIN, spelled out in 10-foot-high letters, and then the reminder: "Teach your kids it's not a dirty word."The billboards are the latest phase in the statewide offensive in the war against teen-age pregnancy launched by Campaign for Our Children, a unique public-private sector venture headed by Baltimore City advertising mogul Hal Donofrio.On a modest $1 million a year, two-thirds of the funding provided by the business community, the organization runs a slick multi-media advertising campaign geared to teen-agers -- complete with radio and television commercials, newspapers, T-shirts, buttons and even a 24-hour hot line -- which work in conjunction with a classroom program, including counseling to encourage abstinence among 9- to 14-year olds.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 16, 2012
There is good news - and some familiar bad news - in recent research into the stubborn question of why our babies have babies when it is such a spectacularly bad idea for both mother and child. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week that teen births have hit an all-time low. In 2010, there were 34.4 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 19, a 9 percent drop from the year before. What makes this news even more welcome is that the birthrate among teens ticked up in the mid-2000s after 20 years of declines, and researchers were at a loss to explain why. Researchers are cautiously attributing the decrease to the public service campaigns that urge kids to delay sex for a while, and then to use contraceptives the first time and every time.
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | January 30, 2012
    So it's official. No one really cares that Newt Gingrich is an egotistical, vainglorious scoundrel, at least where women are concerned. Sure, his ex-wife went on TV two days before the South Carolina primary and re-dished a bunch of dirt about their marriage, but based on the outcome there, it seems GOP voters got over the whole family values thing a long time ago. At the very least, it seems that unapologetic combativeness is proving a more effective campaign strategy than bragging about the longevity of your marriage or releasing enviably wholesome family portraits.
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