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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
It is surely not as hard a slap in the face to Baltimore's sense of media identity as the makers of John Waters' "Hairspray" filming the movie version in Toronto. But now comes official word from the producers of MTV's "Skins" that this American version of the Brit teen hit won't be filmed in Baltimore — nor will it even be set here. It will be filmed in Toronto instead — and set in a "general eastern seaboard" city, according to Bryan Elsley, the co-creator and executive producer of both the BBC series and its American spinoff, which debuts early next year.
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Susan Reimer | May 12, 2014
Emily Bazelon, author of a deeply researched book on teenage bullying titled "Sticks and Stones," tells this story on herself. She is riding a subway and a group of teens starts tormenting a vulnerable - poor or perhaps homeless - man. She watches and then says to herself, "Wait, what am I doing sitting here? I am writing a book about bullying!" She intervenes, and the young people turn on her. When the train stops, they follow her out of the car and into the station, taunting her and threatening her. She feels the eyes of everyone in the station on her. She hears them wondering what she has done to merit all this anger.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 17, 2000
Tonight's series' finale of "Beverly Hills 90210" ends on the wedding of Donna Martin (Tori Spelling) and David Silver (Brian Austin Green), with all their friends joining them for this rite of passage into adulthood. The final scene at the reception -- with Donna, David, Brandon, Dylan, Kelly, Andrea and Steve moving as one on a tightly packed dance floor -- has a truly tribal feel to it. In a cultural sense, this is a near-perfect conclusion to the 10-year, prime-time teen drama, according to Robert J. Thompson, director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television at Syracuse University and author of "Television's Second Golden Age," a look at network drama in the 1980s and '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
It is surely not as hard a slap in the face to Baltimore's sense of media identity as the makers of John Waters' "Hairspray" filming the movie version in Toronto. But now comes official word from the producers of MTV's "Skins" that this American version of the Brit teen hit won't be filmed in Baltimore — nor will it even be set here. It will be filmed in Toronto instead — and set in a "general eastern seaboard" city, according to Bryan Elsley, the co-creator and executive producer of both the BBC series and its American spinoff, which debuts early next year.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 22, 2000
"Grosse Pointe" is one of the few new series of the coming season that has generated any buzz. While that might have a lot to say about what a sorry crop of new series the networks have produced, there are plenty of things to like about this parody of the teen drama genre from creator Darren Star ("Sex and the City"). As the new fall series go, this is definitely one of the funnier, smarter and more skillfully crafted. Star, who created both "Beverly Hills, 90210" and "Melrose Place" for Aaron Spelling's production company, pretty much invented the genre as we know it today.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 4, 1990
"Beverly Hills, 90210" is supposed to be a family drama. But it's mainly a teen drama -- lots of teen, not much drama.That's the story in the 90-minute pilot, which premieres at 8:30 tonight on WBFF-TV (Channel 45), anyway.The new Fox series is ostensibly about a family of four, the Walshes, that relocates from Minneapolis to Beverly Hills when the father of the family gets a job transfer. (The 90210 in the title is the zip code in Beverly Hills to which the family relocates.) But the father (played by James Eckhouse)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 12, 2014
Emily Bazelon, author of a deeply researched book on teenage bullying titled "Sticks and Stones," tells this story on herself. She is riding a subway and a group of teens starts tormenting a vulnerable - poor or perhaps homeless - man. She watches and then says to herself, "Wait, what am I doing sitting here? I am writing a book about bullying!" She intervenes, and the young people turn on her. When the train stops, they follow her out of the car and into the station, taunting her and threatening her. She feels the eyes of everyone in the station on her. She hears them wondering what she has done to merit all this anger.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 1997
SEVERAL MONTHS ago, Amanda Kraft attended a Sunday service at Friendship Church of the Brethren to ask for help taking a trip to Mexico with Teen Mania Ministries.Church members took up an offering to help pay her expenses, and they prayed for her.Amanda recently returned from Mexico -- where she celebrated her 15th birthday -- full of enthusiasm and grateful for the church's help."It was awesome, it was indescribable," she said.Amanda said she began her two-week trip in Garden Valley, Texas.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 20, 2003
Sex between adults is a grinding, compromised and often debased proposition - especially in marriage. But sex between two teens is an innocent, beautiful, passionate poem of transcendence with which nothing should be allowed to interfere. That's the logic of Skin, a new Fox drama premiering tonight. And, while it might seem a peculiar or twisted logic to many adult viewers, grown-ups are not the demographic this series most wants to reach. At its core, Skin is a glossy, glittery, sexy, California teen drama trying to push the same hormonal buttons as The O.C. - the hot, hot, hot drama about teen life in Orange County that Fox debuted during the summer.
FEATURES
By Enid Portuguez and Enid Portuguez,Los Angeles Times | July 31, 2008
With its impossibly good-looking cast, parade of candy-colored designer fashions and provocative ad campaigns, it's easy to dismiss the CW's Gossip Girl as just another sexed-up, youth-oriented product to step off the TV drama assembly line. There are certainly similarities between the show and its teen soap predecessors, particularly Beverly Hills, 90210. Gossip Girl is also set in an affluent ZIP Code, Manhattan's Upper East Side, and features an ensemble of archetypal characters, including the social outcast and the pretty-boy rebel with great hair.
FEATURES
By Enid Portuguez and Enid Portuguez,Los Angeles Times | July 31, 2008
With its impossibly good-looking cast, parade of candy-colored designer fashions and provocative ad campaigns, it's easy to dismiss the CW's Gossip Girl as just another sexed-up, youth-oriented product to step off the TV drama assembly line. There are certainly similarities between the show and its teen soap predecessors, particularly Beverly Hills, 90210. Gossip Girl is also set in an affluent ZIP Code, Manhattan's Upper East Side, and features an ensemble of archetypal characters, including the social outcast and the pretty-boy rebel with great hair.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 20, 2003
Sex between adults is a grinding, compromised and often debased proposition - especially in marriage. But sex between two teens is an innocent, beautiful, passionate poem of transcendence with which nothing should be allowed to interfere. That's the logic of Skin, a new Fox drama premiering tonight. And, while it might seem a peculiar or twisted logic to many adult viewers, grown-ups are not the demographic this series most wants to reach. At its core, Skin is a glossy, glittery, sexy, California teen drama trying to push the same hormonal buttons as The O.C. - the hot, hot, hot drama about teen life in Orange County that Fox debuted during the summer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 22, 2000
"Grosse Pointe" is one of the few new series of the coming season that has generated any buzz. While that might have a lot to say about what a sorry crop of new series the networks have produced, there are plenty of things to like about this parody of the teen drama genre from creator Darren Star ("Sex and the City"). As the new fall series go, this is definitely one of the funnier, smarter and more skillfully crafted. Star, who created both "Beverly Hills, 90210" and "Melrose Place" for Aaron Spelling's production company, pretty much invented the genre as we know it today.
FEATURES
By Crystal Williams and Crystal Williams,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2000
Naomi Kline of Baltimore learned the benefits of being able to act at a very young age. "I realized that when you fall asleep in the car, you get carried in," says Kline. "So I began to pretend to sleep in the car to get carried. That's when I first realized something could come from acting." It's been a while since her parents carried her in from the car, but Kline, now 18, is still acting - and reaping the benefits. This summer, that's included a prime guest-starring role in "Young Americans," a well-received new series airing on the WB network, that might turn into a permanent role this fall.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 17, 2000
Tonight's series' finale of "Beverly Hills 90210" ends on the wedding of Donna Martin (Tori Spelling) and David Silver (Brian Austin Green), with all their friends joining them for this rite of passage into adulthood. The final scene at the reception -- with Donna, David, Brandon, Dylan, Kelly, Andrea and Steve moving as one on a tightly packed dance floor -- has a truly tribal feel to it. In a cultural sense, this is a near-perfect conclusion to the 10-year, prime-time teen drama, according to Robert J. Thompson, director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television at Syracuse University and author of "Television's Second Golden Age," a look at network drama in the 1980s and '90s.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 1997
SEVERAL MONTHS ago, Amanda Kraft attended a Sunday service at Friendship Church of the Brethren to ask for help taking a trip to Mexico with Teen Mania Ministries.Church members took up an offering to help pay her expenses, and they prayed for her.Amanda recently returned from Mexico -- where she celebrated her 15th birthday -- full of enthusiasm and grateful for the church's help."It was awesome, it was indescribable," she said.Amanda said she began her two-week trip in Garden Valley, Texas.
FEATURES
By Crystal Williams and Crystal Williams,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2000
Naomi Kline of Baltimore learned the benefits of being able to act at a very young age. "I realized that when you fall asleep in the car, you get carried in," says Kline. "So I began to pretend to sleep in the car to get carried. That's when I first realized something could come from acting." It's been a while since her parents carried her in from the car, but Kline, now 18, is still acting - and reaping the benefits. This summer, that's included a prime guest-starring role in "Young Americans," a well-received new series airing on the WB network, that might turn into a permanent role this fall.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 28, 1995
Fox is selling "The Price of Love" as a daring and socially responsible look at the world of teen runaways and male prostitution in Hollywood.Truth-in-advertising check: It is neither.But the made-for-television film, which airs at 8 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), is one worth watching and thinking and talking about, especially for parents of teen-agers.One not-so-complicated reason to watch is that you are going to see a guaranteed future star making his network film debut in the person of Peter Facinelli, who plays a 16-year-old runaway named Bret.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 28, 1995
Fox is selling "The Price of Love" as a daring and socially responsible look at the world of teen runaways and male prostitution in Hollywood.Truth-in-advertising check: It is neither.But the made-for-television film, which airs at 8 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), is one worth watching and thinking and talking about, especially for parents of teen-agers.One not-so-complicated reason to watch is that you are going to see a guaranteed future star making his network film debut in the person of Peter Facinelli, who plays a 16-year-old runaway named Bret.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 4, 1990
"Beverly Hills, 90210" is supposed to be a family drama. But it's mainly a teen drama -- lots of teen, not much drama.That's the story in the 90-minute pilot, which premieres at 8:30 tonight on WBFF-TV (Channel 45), anyway.The new Fox series is ostensibly about a family of four, the Walshes, that relocates from Minneapolis to Beverly Hills when the father of the family gets a job transfer. (The 90210 in the title is the zip code in Beverly Hills to which the family relocates.) But the father (played by James Eckhouse)
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