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Teen Age Pregnancy

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By New York Times | June 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has settled on a campaign against teen-age pregnancy that includes new restrictions on welfare payments, $400 million in grants to schools and neighborhoods over five years, and the use of the president's bully pulpit to promote responsible behavior.Officials who outlined the plan said three-quarters of the grant money would go to a thousand needy schools, to be used for education and counseling programs. While there will be much local flexibility, the programs may be loosely patterned after an Atlanta model that promotes both abstinence and contraception and uses older students as mentors.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2004
A new, state-by-state breakdown of teen-age pregnancy and abortion rates in 2000 shows declines among all racial and ethnic groups and in every state, continuing a decade-long downward trend that researchers attribute to better contraception and less, or more cautious, sexual activity. Overall, the national pregnancy rate declined by 2 percent between 1999 and 2000, and fell by 28 percent from its 1990 peak, according to data compiled by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that supports abortion rights Nationwide, one-third of pregnancies among 15- to 19-year-olds ended in abortion in 2000, and the rate of abortions per 1,000 women in that age group declined to 24, down from a high of 43.5 per 1,000 in the late 1980s.
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NEWS
By Janet B. Hardy | December 11, 1991
THERE IS good news and bad with respect to the enormously costly and socially destructive problem of adolescent pregnancy in Baltimore.As reported in The Evening Sun Nov. 26, births to school-age mothers declined during the most recent two-year period (1989-1990) for which data are available. It is really good news that, at long last, there may be a break in the slow but steady increase in births to adolescents. Moreover, the decrease is most marked among the youngest and most vulnerable girls, those from 10 to 15 years old.The statistics from the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy indicate that the risk of pregnancy among adolescents has decreased.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | May 21, 2003
Even though teen-age pregnancy rates have dropped during the past 10 years, adolescents are beginning sexual activity at very young ages. In a study released yesterday, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy found that about 20 percent of teen-agers report having sex before the age of 15. The National Committee commissioned seven groups of researchers to analyze data from studies done in the mid- to late 1990s (including the National Survey of...
NEWS
By Christopher Scanlan and Christopher Scanlan,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The federal government is quietly planning a dramatic -- and controversial -- shift in its attack against teen-age pregnancy and the epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents.The Clinton administration plans to revise the 12-year-old Republican message of "Just Say No" to premarital sex byplacing greater emphasis on birth control and disease prevention.For the past several months, the Department of Health and Human Services has been developing an ambitious proposal that could end up funneling millions, perhaps billions, of dollars into comprehensive health services for the nation's 35 million 10- to 19-year-olds.
NEWS
November 24, 1990
Efforts to deal with teen-age pregnancy have long been flawed by lack of attention to young males. Yet teen-age sex and pregnancy are not just the concern or responsibility of young girls.Fortunately, Maryland authorities concerned with children and youth have recognized this gap in the system. New programs in pregnancy prevention now include males. Here's why:Nationwide in 1987, at least 105,364 teen-age boys became fathers and 85,637 babies were born to parents who were both teens, according to the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 16, 1996
BOSTON -- Amanda Smisek was seven months pregnant when a note was brought to her high school classroom in Emmett, Idaho, asking her to go down to the city police station and talk to a detective. At the time, she says, ''I thought someone had gotten into trouble.''This was the phrase we once used to describe girls who got pregnant. But of course Amanda had no idea that she, like a half-dozen other unwed teen-age parents-to-be -- including her boyfriend -- would be found guilty of ''fornication.
NEWS
November 20, 1995
REGARDLESS OF whether Howard compares favorably with other area counties when it comes to the behavior of its youth, any level of risky behavior involving drugs, alcohol or sex is cause for alarm. The county's health department should be commended for trying to sound the alarm about these problems despite a state-issued report that gave the county high marks on the general health of its residents, including a relatively low incidence of AIDS and teen-age pregnancy.In data it plans to release to the school board and other sources in the coming months, the health department reports what it calls a "clustering" of risky behavior, including a higher than average use of marijuana among teen-agers.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | December 7, 1990
A teen-ager's best source for facts about sex is another teen-ager.That's the theory behind a new program approved by the Baltimore school board last night to promote sexual abstinence among students.The federally funded program will employ high school students as paid "peer counselors" to talk with eighth graders about sexuality and abstinence.And in a city where teen-age pregnancy is rampant, the program is essential, said Andrea Bowden, a specialist with the school department's office of science and health.
NEWS
February 6, 1992
Throughout Baltimore City, a new and rather arresting image has been plastered on billboards: the word VIRGIN, spelled out in 10-foot-high letters, and then the reminder: "Teach your kids it's not a dirty word."The billboards are the latest phase in the statewide offensive in the war against teen-age pregnancy launched by Campaign for Our Children, a unique public-private sector venture headed by Baltimore City advertising mogul Hal Donofrio.On a modest $1 million a year, two-thirds of the funding provided by the business community, the organization runs a slick multi-media advertising campaign geared to teen-agers -- complete with radio and television commercials, newspapers, T-shirts, buttons and even a 24-hour hot line -- which work in conjunction with a classroom program, including counseling to encourage abstinence among 9- to 14-year olds.
NEWS
February 14, 2000
Will prosecuting older men protect girls against abuse? Prosecuting older men who have sex with girls who have not even reached the age of 16 would not just reduce the pregnancy rate in Maryland ("Md. looks to rape laws to cut teen birth rates," Feb. 5). More important, it would stop many young ladies from being used and abused by so-called men who view children as sex objects to be exploited. Regardless how physically developed these young women may be, they still have the mind of a child -- which is what makes them easy prey for older men. In my opinion, any man who would have sex with a child needs to be locked up. This might not eliminate the teen-age pregnancy problem.
NEWS
November 15, 1999
On teen pregnancy, the state's efforts have really paid offThanks for The Sun's article "Better message on teen pregnancy" (Nov. 9). Many dedicated individuals and organizations work with teen-agers to encourage healthy decision-making, so it is no wonder that Maryland's teen-age birth rate is declining faster than the national average.The state's efforts to address teen-age pregnancy began in 1976 and continue today with the governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy's mass media and grassroots initiatives.
FEATURES
February 9, 1999
FEWER TEENS are having sex and fewer teens are having babies, the latest health statistics say, meaning these worrisome numbers have been in steady decline for about a decade now.Happy news indeed, until you look up from the pages of these reports and see that the United States has double the teen birth rate of England, nearest the United States on the list of industrialized countries."
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
Throw an Oakland Mills High School freshman, the Internet and a poem about teen-age pregnancy into a pot -- and you've got some "Chicken Soup for the Soul."Amanda Dykstra, 15, will be published in "Chicken Soup for the Teen-Age Soul," the ninth book in a wildly successful series devoted to uplifting and poignant vignettes.The version for teen-agers is arriving in bookstores this week.Her poem describes how pregnancy changed her friend."Amanda's poem is very powerful," said Kimberly Kirberger, managing editor of the "Chicken Soup" series.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | December 8, 1996
THOSE TWO New Jersey college freshmen who threw their newborn baby in a Dumpster a few weeks ago, perhaps after crushing its skull, made me think of another teen-ager and another discarded baby. For all their shared awfulness, the two cases evoke such different emotions, one must ponder why.Michelle Savage never made the pages of Time and Newsweek. doubt that many here in the Baltimore area ever heard of her. Like many young parents guilty of crimes against the just-born, she was poor, a resident of subsidized housing near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 16, 1996
BOSTON -- Amanda Smisek was seven months pregnant when a note was brought to her high school classroom in Emmett, Idaho, asking her to go down to the city police station and talk to a detective. At the time, she says, ''I thought someone had gotten into trouble.''This was the phrase we once used to describe girls who got pregnant. But of course Amanda had no idea that she, like a half-dozen other unwed teen-age parents-to-be -- including her boyfriend -- would be found guilty of ''fornication.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
Throw an Oakland Mills High School freshman, the Internet and a poem about teen-age pregnancy into a pot -- and you've got some "Chicken Soup for the Soul."Amanda Dykstra, 15, will be published in "Chicken Soup for the Teen-Age Soul," the ninth book in a wildly successful series devoted to uplifting and poignant vignettes.The version for teen-agers is arriving in bookstores this week.Her poem describes how pregnancy changed her friend."Amanda's poem is very powerful," said Kimberly Kirberger, managing editor of the "Chicken Soup" series.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2004
A new, state-by-state breakdown of teen-age pregnancy and abortion rates in 2000 shows declines among all racial and ethnic groups and in every state, continuing a decade-long downward trend that researchers attribute to better contraception and less, or more cautious, sexual activity. Overall, the national pregnancy rate declined by 2 percent between 1999 and 2000, and fell by 28 percent from its 1990 peak, according to data compiled by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that supports abortion rights Nationwide, one-third of pregnancies among 15- to 19-year-olds ended in abortion in 2000, and the rate of abortions per 1,000 women in that age group declined to 24, down from a high of 43.5 per 1,000 in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 23, 1996
TIPTON, Ind. -- The seat of Tipton County has a picturesque stone courthouse, a middle-income, church-going population, a small-town friendliness -- and a teen pregnancy rate that rivals Baltimore's.As members of the Teen Pregnancy Coalition formed two years ago to fight the problem, they adopted a theory that's discussed more and more: Americans have become too accepting of high-school motherhood."The overreaction was dad standing in the doorway and the girl in rags shivering in the cold with her baby," says Mark Anderson, associate pastor of Tipton's West Street Christian Church.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1996
Maybe the teen-age girl has an upset stomach that she believes is morning sickness, or she notices another telltale sign. She's scared, and she goes to a clinic for a pregnancy test.The girl is like thousands of other high-risk teen-agers who had been regarded as almost impossible to identify, let alone reach with advice and counseling intended to keep them from becoming mothers too soon.Researchers now say that first pregnancy test, administered at the school or community clinic, presents a key opportunity to intervene.
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