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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Ted Williams, the homeless Ohio man who became an overnight sensation earlier this year, will be bringing his "golden voice" to Charm City in August when he serves as announcer for Baltimore Fashion Week, the event's executive director, Sharan Nixon, confirmed. Williams signed a contract Tuesday morning that results in him live announcing designers each day of the four-day event. In addition, Williams will do radio spots and attend promotional events associated with Baltimore Fashion Week, which runs Aug. 18-21.
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SPORTS
September 29, 2011
Reyes is anti-baseball Paul Doyle Hartford Courant In one of the greatest 24-hour stretches in baseball history, fans were treated to wall-to-wall drama. Everywhere, players were seizing the moment. Then there's Jose Reyes, who decided to sit on his moment. He left the Mets' game after his first-inning bunt single in an effort to secure a batting title. Reyes isn't just the anti-Ted Williams, he's anti-everything we love about baseball. Even his manager, baseball lifer Terry Collins, said he understood the jeering he heard from the crowd.
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SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 26, 2001
NEW YORK - All his IV infusion lines are gone, he's being weaned off his respirator, his heart is up and running, and Ted Williams is "on the mend," his doctor reported yesterday. The Boston Red Sox legend has been getting support from across America, including a phone call from President Bush and a banana nut bread sent over by fellow Hall of Famer Bob Feller. "I feel like I'm a switchboard," said Williams' son, John Henry, who also fielded calls former manager Tom Lasorda and Dom DiMaggio, who played alongside Williams.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2011
Baltimore Fashion Week may be under way, but the showcase of models and designers is missing its star announcer. Due to contract disputes, Ted Williams, the homeless Ohio man with the golden baritone who became an overnight sensation earlier this year, won't be manning the microphone this weekend, organizers said Friday. Fashion Week founder Sharan Nixon said she canceled Williams' contract because he made last-minute requests which soured the deal — accusations Williams' camp denies.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | March 29, 1998
CITRUS HILLS, Fla. - It's where Ted Williams - colorful, controversial, confident and so almighty competent - reveals his treasures and memories for all to see and even to hear in his own personal museum. Pictures, the player contracts he signed and equipment he used are on display. And, via video, he announces his selected lineup of the 20 greatest hitters of all time-a subject he knows so much about that it's akin to listening to a replay of Thomas Edison explaining electricity.The voice of the speaker is so authoritative that no mere mortal.
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 20, 2001
NEW YORK - The artificial pump that helped Ted Williams' heart function after Monday's surgery has been removed and he is being given fewer medications, leading his doctor yesterday to say the Boston Red Sox legend is making "very gratifying progress." But there's still a rocky road ahead. Williams remains on a ventilator, which poses a risk of pneumonia or other infections. He's still heavily sedated, continues to require drug support and is attached to three intravenous lines, although a catheter going to his heart has been removed.
SPORTS
By Dave Kindred and Dave Kindred,The Sporting News | November 11, 1994
So one night the president of the United States goes to the Lincoln bedroom in the White House.He wants to show his guest something. They walk to a room next door and stop in front of two dressers with large mirrors and stacks of drawers.There the president pulls open a drawer to reveal a cache the contents of which are so unexpected that his guest, even years later, would say of that moment, "Geez, I was just startled."What Ted Williams saw, that night by Lincoln's bedroom in the White House, were hundreds of a fishermen's flies: "Salmon flies and English flies.
SPORTS
By DAVID WHITLEY and DAVID WHITLEY,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 26, 2006
Hernando, Fla. --At least Ted Williams looks at peace. It's a warm spring morning and he's sitting on a park bench. The rolling landscape of Citrus Hills spreads out before him. It's a nice scene, the kind Teddy Ballgame deserves to enjoy for eternity. Then you hear a road grader rev up and are snapped back to reality. Ted is a statue. The noise is a fitting symbol of his afterlife. All Williams really wanted was to have his ashes spread over the nearby waters where he loved to fish.
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 2002
Making any suggestion to Ted Williams about hitting a baseball took a lot of nerve, but Ty Cobb was shamelessly bold. In the 1940s, the retired Hall of Fame outfielder sent the future Hall of Famer a letter urging him to hit more to the opposite field. It would increase Williams' batting average, Cobb contended, and it would discourage opponents' desperate tactic of overshifting infielders toward right field to combat the Boston Red Sox superstar. "I was in a cab with Ted when he opened the letter," recalled Bobby Doerr, Williams' longtime Red Sox teammate, friend and fishing buddy.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
Teddy Ballgame has become Teddy Ballcard.This month, the first issue of the Ted Williams Ballcard Co. goes on sale. And the focus is on the past.The 200-card set features former major-leaguers, stars of the Negro Leagues, four members of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League and two current players. Juan Gonzalez and Jeff Bagwell are the active players featured in a 10-card subset with Williams' comments on the backs.There are regionalized insert sets featuring the 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers, 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers, 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates and 1975 Cincinnati Reds.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Ted Williams, the homeless Ohio man who became an overnight sensation earlier this year, will be bringing his "golden voice" to Charm City in August when he serves as announcer for Baltimore Fashion Week, the event's executive director, Sharan Nixon, confirmed. Williams signed a contract Tuesday morning that results in him live announcing designers each day of the four-day event. In addition, Williams will do radio spots and attend promotional events associated with Baltimore Fashion Week, which runs Aug. 18-21.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 16, 2011
Everyone in the country must know by now the story of Ted Williams, the homeless man with the golden radio baritone. He became a sensation after an Ohio newspaper's video of him making voice-of-God announcements on a street corner went YouTube. Since gaining national attention, Mr. Williams has recorded voice-overs for MSNBC and Kraft, and he's been offered an announcing job by the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association. He's also apparently headed for some drug and alcohol rehab after his family called him out on the " Dr. Phil" show.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
First baseman Rhyne Hughes isn't sure he is the spark the Orioles need to break out of their early-season funk. If he is, though, he's willing to play the role. "I just want to be here and do what I can to help out," said Hughes, who is 4-for-9 with two RBIs since being recalled from Triple-A Norfolk on Saturday. "Everybody knows we've been scuffling a little bit. … When we're playing well, everyone has a lot more fun, and that's what I'm trying to do. If I bring a spark, then I'll do that."
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | April 25, 2007
The news of David Halberstam's death hit me like a sharp jab in the chest. It was strange because I don't generally experience strong feelings at the passing of public people. But I had only to stare at my bookcase to know the reason. When you own every book a man has written and you've pored over some of them until the covers are smudged and the corners worn, you feel you know him a little. I started my reminiscences by pulling Summer of '49 from an upper shelf. It was the first Halberstam book I owned, bought for me by my mother when I was 13. I was already a devout baseball nut by then, and I could've told anyone that the Yankees won the World Series that year.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 27, 2006
St. Louis-- --Albert Pujols is the best hitter I've seen swing a baseball bat. Of course, that might not mean a whole lot considering most of baseball history took place before I was born and power numbers from the current generation of sluggers can seem about as believable as a Tolkien novel. So, as we prepare for Game 5 of the World Series tonight, the St. Louis Cardinals one game away from winning the whole thing, I sought out a better source, someone who knows a thing or two about hitting.
SPORTS
By DAVID WHITLEY and DAVID WHITLEY,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 26, 2006
Hernando, Fla. --At least Ted Williams looks at peace. It's a warm spring morning and he's sitting on a park bench. The rolling landscape of Citrus Hills spreads out before him. It's a nice scene, the kind Teddy Ballgame deserves to enjoy for eternity. Then you hear a road grader rev up and are snapped back to reality. Ted is a statue. The noise is a fitting symbol of his afterlife. All Williams really wanted was to have his ashes spread over the nearby waters where he loved to fish.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2002
Baseball Hall of Famer Ted Williams was a complicated man with a surprisingly simple goal in life. From the time he emerged as a star with the Boston Red Sox - during the darkening years before the start of World War II - he was on a mission to prove that there would never be another quite like him. "All I want out of life," he once said, "is that when I walk down the street folks will say, `There goes the greatest hitter who ever lived.'" Mr. Williams died yesterday of cardiac arrest at the age of 83, his lofty goal fulfilled.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | February 16, 1993
Boston's winter of 1948 was bitterly cold. Slugger Ted Williams went south to fish. On Jan. 28, while Ted was fishing in Florida, Doris Williams gave birth to a daughter, Barbara Joyce Williams. The baby was early. Ted was late.The Globe's Harold Kaese wrote, "Everyone knows where Moses was when the lights went out. And apparently everybody knows where Ted Williams was when his baby was born Tuesday. He was fishing."In his biography, "My Turn at Bat," Williams wrote, "Well, Bobby Jo was the most important thing in my life from the moment she was born . . . but I sure wasn't going to apologize for something that didn't concern anybody but Doris and me."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2004
Augustino "Buddy" Paolino, whose East Baltimore crab house was a favorite of politicians, sports figures and show business celebrities and known for serving piles of steamed crustaceans and pitchers of cold National Beer, died of a heart attack Saturday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. The Essex resident was 80. Mr. Paolino was born in Baltimore, one of nine children of Italian immigrant parents, and raised in Highlandtown. He attended Our Lady of Pompei Parochial School until the seventh grade, when he left to help support his family.
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