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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 10, 2006
No one in television news clarifies complicated issues better than Ted Koppel, and tonight at 8 on the Discovery Channel, he takes on one of the thorniest: how to find a balance between security and civil liberties in post-Sept. 11 America. Viewers sifting through the crush of anniversary programming looking for one show that will best help them make sense of the fallout from the attacks of 2001 need look no further. Though engaging and slickly produced, Koppel on Discovery: The Price of Security is above all a public-affairs program that addresses viewers as citizens with the goal of informing them about the changing world in which they live.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: BLANDISHMENT All of us are susceptible to persuasion, but some methods are more effective than others. We can be persuaded to write that memo or file that form by nagging or outright threats, but most of us would probably prefer blandishments. Blandishment (pronounced BLAND-ish-ment)
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2004
On Sunday, Fox News' Chris Wallace plans to counter what he says is the anti-war message that emerged from last Friday's Nightline, which devoted 40 minutes to reading the names of more than 700 U.S. troops who have died in Iraq since the invasion last year. Nightline anchor Ted Koppel expressly disavowed any political intent. But Wallace, a former ABC News correspondent who used to substitute for Koppel on the show, says he was offended by the tribute, called "The Fallen." "I take Ted at his word that he did not intend it as a rating stunt or to be an anti-war statement, but I think it became that way," Wallace said yesterday.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
I like Oprah Winfrey, and I was happy to see her Tuesday morning on CBS with her old pal, Gayle King, hitting on all cylinders as they hyped the gate for her interview with Lance Armstrong. She promised King, Charlie Rose and everyone else on the last-place morning show set, "You will be satisfied," by the interview that airs Thursday night on the OWN cable channel. "You will come away understanding that he brought it," she said, though she did hedge on theĀ  specific extent of his confession versus her expectations.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 15, 1992
My guess is that Ted Koppel hasn't enjoyed reading his mail the past few days. Not unless he enjoys being called foul names and accused of being a fawning liberal fool.Judging from the letters I've received, he seems to have offended a sizable number of people who take great pride in having been born with pinkish skin.They're upset with Koppel because he did a "Nightline" interview with two tough young men who are members, or possibly leaders, of the Crips and the Bloods, the biggest and meanest of the L.A. street gangs.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 23, 2005
With Ted Koppel's departure last night from ABC's Nightline, the face of the ever-changing daily news became even less familiar. Koppel, who signed off for the final time with his standard line, "For all of us here at ABC News - good night," was the fourth network news anchor to leave his position in what seems to have been a yearlong exodus of newsmen who defined the business. After 20 years with virtually no change, all three major networks have lost, for various reasons, their news anchors: Tom Brokaw retired in December from NBC Evening News; Dan Rather in March resigned from CBS Evening News, and Peter Jennings left the anchor desk of ABC World News Tonight in April and died of lung cancer four months later.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 5, 2001
When Ted Koppel takes on the topics dominating the headlines, he often puts his peers to shame. His dissection last month of the evasions by Rep. Gary Condit after the politician's disastrous televised interview, for instance, was controlled, convincing and even-handed. On Friday, when Koppel introduces the first of a five-part Nightline series on the multiple miseries afflicting the Congo, however, the longtime ABC journalist will acknowledge his own shame. The murder trial of a former football great or the drownings of her infant children by an anguished mother automatically draw enormous media interest because of strong public interest, Koppel says.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 12, 2002
Late-night talk show host David Letterman cut short ABC's high-stakes courtship yesterday, telling viewers that he will remain at CBS. He said he did not want to damage ABC News's Nightline, which holds the same 11:35 p.m. slot as his Late Show on CBS. Despite Letterman's decision, Nightline anchor and managing editor Ted Koppel said last night that his network's owner, Disney, has seriously undermined the program's future by pursuing the late-night host....
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 2, 2002
ABC's efforts to land late-night host David Letterman have cast a shadow over the fate of Nightline, Ted Koppel's highly regarded news program at the struggling network. Staffers at ABC said that the news division, including ABC News President David Westin, first learned of the Letterman negotiations on Thursday night. Like Nightline, Letterman's current CBS show airs weeknights at 11:35. But senior ABC network executives have recently made it clear to Letterman they would be willing to shift or cancel the news program to accommodate him. Several people at ABC News confirmed the network's eagerness yesterday to pursue Letterman, even at Nightline's expense.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 8, 2002
Once the novelty of tonight's premiere of Up Close wears off, it does not look as if there is going to be much of anything worth getting excited about in this new weeknight series from ABC News. Up Close debuts with Nightline's Ted Koppel interviewing David Letterman. It's a "good get" as interviews go. It's Letterman's first television interview in five years, according to ABC News. Furthermore, of course, there is the back story of Disney, the owner of ABC, trying to get Letterman last year to leave CBS and replace Koppel on ABC. Letterman used the overture to increase his value to CBS before re-upping, and then publicly played the role of friend of Ted and enemy of the evil corporate owners of the network for which Ted still works, saying how wrong it was of Disney to treat Ted that way. So, there is considerable interest in seeing what Letterman will say tonight about the network back-stabbing, not to mention the irony of the situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
I was going to be nice and NOT write about the NBC newsmagazine "Rock Center" moving to 9 p.m. tonight after a failed run at 10 Mondays with Brian Williams at the helm. But then, NBC News sent out a press release calling special correspondent Chelsea Clinton and the rest of the newsmagazine team "the Cooperstown of NBC News. " Remember the quote from the president of NBC News about Clinton having "prepared all her life" for her new job as a TV correspondent? (Yeah, she prepared by NOT talkiing to the press when she was on the campaign trail on behalf of her mother in 2008.)
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2008
NEW YORK - Ted Koppel knows that persuading television viewers to tune into a four-part documentary about China's economic growth could be a difficult sell. So in the days leading to the broadcast of his latest Discovery Channel program, the veteran newsman took a drastic step to gin up interest: He brought his daughter's dog onto The Daily Show and suggested that the network might send Pepper to "Bideawee Farm" if the series doesn't get good ratings. All kidding aside, Koppel feels a particular sense of urgency about The People's Republic of Capitalism, which premieres tomorrow.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 10, 2006
No one in television news clarifies complicated issues better than Ted Koppel, and tonight at 8 on the Discovery Channel, he takes on one of the thorniest: how to find a balance between security and civil liberties in post-Sept. 11 America. Viewers sifting through the crush of anniversary programming looking for one show that will best help them make sense of the fallout from the attacks of 2001 need look no further. Though engaging and slickly produced, Koppel on Discovery: The Price of Security is above all a public-affairs program that addresses viewers as citizens with the goal of informing them about the changing world in which they live.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 23, 2005
With Ted Koppel's departure last night from ABC's Nightline, the face of the ever-changing daily news became even less familiar. Koppel, who signed off for the final time with his standard line, "For all of us here at ABC News - good night," was the fourth network news anchor to leave his position in what seems to have been a yearlong exodus of newsmen who defined the business. After 20 years with virtually no change, all three major networks have lost, for various reasons, their news anchors: Tom Brokaw retired in December from NBC Evening News; Dan Rather in March resigned from CBS Evening News, and Peter Jennings left the anchor desk of ABC World News Tonight in April and died of lung cancer four months later.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 22, 2005
The affiliates didn't want his show, and his network bosses didn't want him to anchor it. Ultimately, they made it all too clear that he was a "last-ditch" choice with what he calls a "fairly insulting" salary offer after they couldn't get CBS anchorman Dan Rather or NBC's Tom Brokaw. That was the not-so-promising beginning 26 years ago of Ted Koppel's career at the anchor desk of ABC News' Nightline -- a critically acclaimed tenure that comes to an end tonight. The creation of pioneering TV producer Roone Arledge, Nightline is one of the few network news innovations of the past 30 years that has provided public service and prestige as well as profits.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
R.I.P. Nightline? ABC news announced yesterday that the show's host, Ted Koppel, will be replaced with a team of three co-anchors in an adjusted format. Starting Nov. 28, the nightly news show will be hosted by three journalists affiliated with ABC: Martin Bashir, Terry Moran and Cynthia McFadden. While Nightline will retain the name that has made it a hallmark for serious, high-minded broadcast journalism, there are indications that the award-winning format is about to change significantly.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 22, 2005
The affiliates didn't want his show, and his network bosses didn't want him to anchor it. Ultimately, they made it all too clear that he was a "last-ditch" choice with what he calls a "fairly insulting" salary offer after they couldn't get CBS anchorman Dan Rather or NBC's Tom Brokaw. That was the not-so-promising beginning 26 years ago of Ted Koppel's career at the anchor desk of ABC News' Nightline -- a critically acclaimed tenure that comes to an end tonight. The creation of pioneering TV producer Roone Arledge, Nightline is one of the few network news innovations of the past 30 years that has provided public service and prestige as well as profits.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 28, 2000
No one in television journalism can focus a debate like ABC's "Nightline." And, starting tonight, Ted Koppel & Co. take on juvenile justice in a five-part series that runs through Friday. Thanks to court orders from judges in California allowing ABC's cameras rare access, "Nightline" was able to spend six months chronicling the lives of juvenile criminals, as well as some of their victims, parents and family members. The reality of their lives is exactly what's missing in so many of the other media debates heard these days as more and more states move to try violent juvenile offenders as adults.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2004
On Sunday, Fox News' Chris Wallace plans to counter what he says is the anti-war message that emerged from last Friday's Nightline, which devoted 40 minutes to reading the names of more than 700 U.S. troops who have died in Iraq since the invasion last year. Nightline anchor Ted Koppel expressly disavowed any political intent. But Wallace, a former ABC News correspondent who used to substitute for Koppel on the show, says he was offended by the tribute, called "The Fallen." "I take Ted at his word that he did not intend it as a rating stunt or to be an anti-war statement, but I think it became that way," Wallace said yesterday.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 2, 2004
FRIDAY'S Nightline -- the one Maryland-based Sinclair Broadcast Group goofily denounced as "motivated by a political agenda to undermine the efforts of the United States in Iraq" and refused to air on its ABC-affiliated television stations -- was titled, "The Fallen," and somewhere Paul Fussell must have been amused. To Fussell -- professor emeritus of English literature at the University of Pennsylvania, skilled curmudgeon, connoisseur of irony, grand essayist on matters of war and culture -- anything in modern media called "The Fallen" would hark back to a bygone age of high diction and reality-masking euphemisms, and essentially would glorify war. In Fussell's seminal work, The Great War and Modern Memory, he presents a list of the noble and poetic language that once lived in Europe and supposedly died in the mustard clouds of World War I -- danger was "peril," the enemy "the foe," to die was "to perish," and the dead were "the fallen."
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