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Ted Kennedy

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By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 14, 1994
QUINCY, Mass. -- Charlie and Doris Doheny are watching Ted Kennedy work a crowd at Shea Park after the dedication of a statue honoring granite workers."
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 19, 2010
I n August, Ted Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate, the last son of Camelot, the soul of the Democratic Party, friend of the people and scourge of robber barons, fat cats and special interests, departed this mortal coil. Now, that's not really my opinion of the man. But if you were inclined to imbue Tom Brokaw with pontifical authority or view the world through the prism of The New York Times, or its mini-me The Boston Globe, that's how you'd see Teddy. So it should be of more than passing interest that "Ted Kennedy's seat" in the Senate may go to Republican Scott Brown today.
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FEATURES
By Chapin Wright and Chapin Wright,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1991
NEW YORK -- The last time judges' robes were a big Halloween seller was in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when Sammy Davis Jr. made the phrase "Here Come De Judge" a national inside joke on "Laugh-In.""It was hot then," said Mike Burke, co-owner of Zak's Fun House.Enter Clarence Thomas.When Burke and his partner, Larry Greenberg, watched the extraordinary public airing of sexual harassment charges against Thomas by law professor Anita Faye Hill, one word kept coming to mind: masks."We had played with the idea while the hearings were going on," said Burke.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 30, 2009
Camelot, Schmamelot. Despite some of the headlines, what died this week was something that never actually was: The Kennedy Camelot, we now know, was largely myth, created in the wake of a president's assassination and offering a context in which to process so traumatic a national event. But when Ted Kennedy died this week, it was as a man, not a myth. That is the price, or actually the gift, of living to be an old man rather than dying as a young one. What he left behind was something more earthbound than lofty, more practical than poetic.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 30, 2009
Camelot, Schmamelot. Despite some of the headlines, what died this week was something that never actually was: The Kennedy Camelot, we now know, was largely myth, created in the wake of a president's assassination and offering a context in which to process so traumatic a national event. But when Ted Kennedy died this week, it was as a man, not a myth. That is the price, or actually the gift, of living to be an old man rather than dying as a young one. What he left behind was something more earthbound than lofty, more practical than poetic.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A Republican senator jokingly warned Ted Kennedy during a heated moment in last week's health care debate that Kennedy was so riled up he might keel over from a heart attack.But that's not how fate works in the Kennedy family.Teddy is the survivor. The only one of the handsome princes allowed to grow old, wrinkled and fat. The only one to truly fulfill the promise of his family's commitment to public service.Yesterday as he traveled to Long Island to console his niece, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg, on the loss of her brother, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy once again took up his role of patriarch-by-default: the one left to pick up the pieces of a family plagued by tragedy.
NEWS
October 25, 1994
TIS THE season for negative political ads on television. Saturday Night Live's Al Franken satirized the practice last weekend.A "Mitt Romney ad" opens with a very unflattering picture of Sen. Ted Kennedy, camera slowly zooming in on Kennedy's face, ending with an extreme close-up of his eyes and nose as the narrator says:"On October 14th, 1978 Ted Kennedy is seen puking in the parking lot of the U.S. Capitol. On February 8th, 1983 Kennedy relieves himself on the leg of a Georgetown waitress.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 18, 1992
THE SENATOR.Richard E. Burke with William and Marilyn Hoffer.St. Martin's.328 pages. $23.95. When I was researching my book, "Senator Ted Kennedy," I interviewed all members of his office staff. All but one. There was a young fellow, Richard Burke, I could never get to sit down and talk to me. Nor did the other staff members want me to."He's just a driver," Melody Parker, the receptionist, said. "He knows nothing." But later Carey Williams, a bill drafter, let it slip out that "Rick is a rehabilitation project.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 2, 1993
I was all set to do a column on Joe McGinniss' new biography of Ted Kennedy, the one in which McGinniss makes up what people are thinking and quotes people he never talked to, when the phone rang."
NEWS
By Rafael A. Olmeda and Rafael A. Olmeda,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | April 18, 2004
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. - This year's presidential election will probably be even closer than the 2000 race, and the outcome will be determined by turnout, the former head of the Republican National Committee told a gathering of activists yesterday. Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who served as RNC chairman for most of the 1990s, said the American voting population is about evenly split between Democrats and Republicans, with very few open to changing their minds between now and November. "In the last three presidential elections, neither candidate got a majority of the vote," said Barbour, referring to the 1992, 1996 and 2000 contests.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
An unlikely, flawed heir to America's political royal family who experienced tragedy, disgrace and triumph in a life of epic proportions, Edward M. "Ted" Kennedy will be remembered as not only one of the most influential political figures of the era but for a life that was quite simply larger than life. For many Americans, he will be recalled fondly as the last of a generation of Kennedys who brought glamour, celebrity and a healthy dose of charisma to public life. But it was only after the untimely deaths of his older brothers that he stepped to the fore - and soon brought scandal to the family name with the drowning death of Mary Jo Kopechne at Chappaquiddick Island.
NEWS
By Mark Miller | July 20, 2009
Veterans of Woodstock '69 will look back fondly on that rock concert of rock concerts on its upcoming 40th anniversary. Those who attended (and others who claim they did) will make a pilgrimage to the Bethel, N.Y., site to wax nostalgic over what became a defining moment for early wave baby-boomers. I didn't attend Woodstock, now sorry to say - but I did, along with millions around the globe, follow that other great 40th year past event: Apollo 11. Those of a certain age carry their own special where-we-were, what-we-were-doing stories vis-?
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 25, 2009
Anyone caught in the logistical nightmare formerly known as Barack Obama's inauguration can take heart that democracy was at work: Even some Kennedys got frozen out. Three of former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's four daughters planned to attend the swearing-in. Yes, they had Uncle Ted to get them tickets, but they waited in line like everybody else to get inside the Purple Zone. And waited. And waited. In a tunnel. In the cold. And mostly in place. They moved a bit over the course of three-plus hours, but not enough to get them inside.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | May 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski calls Sen. Edward M. Kennedy "one of the Galahads." When the Maryland Democrat arrived in the Senate two decades ago, Kennedy was ready to show her the ways of the upper chamber, to help her win a seat on the powerful Appropriations Committee, to team up with her on several measures to improve women's health. Yesterday, Mikulski called news of his cancer diagnosis "wrenching -- like a punch in the heart." "Senator Kennedy is one of my oldest friends in Congress," Mikulski, who wiped tears from her eyes yesterday as she entered the Senate chamber to vote, said through a spokeswoman.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 27, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - It probably won't go down as an important moment in the history of the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry, but it was my favorite sports story of the week until good sense and a spirit of compromise came along and ruined everything. Manhattan lawyer Kerry Konrad bid $2,325 in an eBay charity auction for the one-day naming rights to Boston's FleetCenter, but the arena balked at his desire to rename it "Derek Jeter Center" in honor of the popular Yankees shortstop and frequent Red Sox nemesis.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
Chip Franklin appeared on Fox News Channel to play the role of Mayor Martin O'Malley's goader-in-chief. In the words of Fox News' Bill O'Reilly: "Is this guy just insane or what?" Franklin's helpful reply: "He's a bit nutty." Franklin has made O'Malley a repeated target of jibes on WBAL radio in recent years, and he stayed true to form on national television. "He's out of touch," Franklin said. "He's ignoring the fact that the city - the real problem in the city is to walk some of the streets.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 19, 2010
I n August, Ted Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate, the last son of Camelot, the soul of the Democratic Party, friend of the people and scourge of robber barons, fat cats and special interests, departed this mortal coil. Now, that's not really my opinion of the man. But if you were inclined to imbue Tom Brokaw with pontifical authority or view the world through the prism of The New York Times, or its mini-me The Boston Globe, that's how you'd see Teddy. So it should be of more than passing interest that "Ted Kennedy's seat" in the Senate may go to Republican Scott Brown today.
NEWS
By Rafael A. Olmeda and Rafael A. Olmeda,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | April 18, 2004
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. - This year's presidential election will probably be even closer than the 2000 race, and the outcome will be determined by turnout, the former head of the Republican National Committee told a gathering of activists yesterday. Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who served as RNC chairman for most of the 1990s, said the American voting population is about evenly split between Democrats and Republicans, with very few open to changing their minds between now and November. "In the last three presidential elections, neither candidate got a majority of the vote," said Barbour, referring to the 1992, 1996 and 2000 contests.
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