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By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 23, 1990
Ted Danson just may be the most popular actor in America. Along with starring as the randy Sam Malone on the highly rated television show "Cheers," he also stars -- with Tom Selleck and Steve Guttenberg -- in the holiday movie smash "Three Men and a Little Lady." All this success and he has the best breath in Hollywood to boot."You've got to try this stuff to believe it," says Danson, ensconced in an L.A. hotel suite where he's promoting the sequel to the blockbuster "Three Men and a Baby."
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By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 22, 2008
LOS ANGELES - There's big news from the Television Critics Association press tour regarding Damages: Ted Danson will be back as Arthur Frobisher on the FX show. His performance in Season 1 as the arrogant capitalist was one of the high points of the show, so that's great news. As to whether Frobisher survived being shot at the end of Season 1, well, that's not clear. FX president and general manager John Landgraf said during his remarks that Frobisher did survive, but the Damages creators would only say that because the series moves backward and forward in time, it's possible that we'll see Frobisher in a flashback when the show returns early next year.
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By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 22, 2008
LOS ANGELES - There's big news from the Television Critics Association press tour regarding Damages: Ted Danson will be back as Arthur Frobisher on the FX show. His performance in Season 1 as the arrogant capitalist was one of the high points of the show, so that's great news. As to whether Frobisher survived being shot at the end of Season 1, well, that's not clear. FX president and general manager John Landgraf said during his remarks that Frobisher did survive, but the Damages creators would only say that because the series moves backward and forward in time, it's possible that we'll see Frobisher in a flashback when the show returns early next year.
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October 23, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Patty (Glenn Close, above) continues her quest to ruin Frobisher (Ted Danson) in the season finale of Damages (10 p.m., FX).
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October 23, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Patty (Glenn Close, above) continues her quest to ruin Frobisher (Ted Danson) in the season finale of Damages (10 p.m., FX).
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By Knight-Ridder | November 22, 1990
There they were, slipping in the trenches of show biz, making movies they'd hope to live down and scrambling for one-liners. Probably nobody remembers that Ted Danson had a role as William Hurt's smarmy friend in "Body Heat" or that Tom Selleck muscled his way on screen as one of Mae West's hunks in "Myra Breckinridge."Both of them hit pay dirt on television, Danson with "Cheers" and Selleck, of course, with "Magnum, P.I." Danson says he has changed so much since he began on "Cheers" nine years ago that he can't even fathom the differences.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 21, 1990
'Three Menand a Little Lady'Starring Tom Selleck, Ted Danson and Steve Guttenberg.Directed by Emile Ardolino.Released by Touchstone.Rated PG.** In "Three Men and a Little Lady," Tom Selleck plays . . . I forget.But that's all right, because at least his co-star Ted Danson is . . . er . . . I forgot that one, too.The third guy is played by Steve . . . Steve . . . Steve Something. I can't remember.Anyway, the plot is about . . . oh, let's see . . . I think it's about these three guys, see, who are raising a baby . . . no, no, it's a little girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 28, 1993
"Made in America"Starring Whoopi Goldberg and Ted DansonDirected by Richard BenjaminReleased by Warner Bros.Rated PG-13** 1/2"Made in America" was made in Hollywood, and it shows.The movie is about an interracial love affair between Ted Danson and Whoopi Goldberg who meet cute when it appears that his sperm may have artificially inseminated her years back, giving -- her daughter an unwelcome Caucasian streak; it is alternatingly grating, loud, insipid and occasionally hilarious.To give the film the guise of topicality, the two lovers are conceived almost as the Beatrice and Benedick of America's racial tragedy.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1997
The hands-down best thing on TV tonight is a 19-year-old miniseries airing all week on the Family Channel. Beyond that, you're on your own."Cosby" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Hilton takes his wife's advice and enters group therapy, where he ends up giving lots of advice himself, most of it bad. CBS."John Tesh: The Avalon Concert" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 10 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- In a concert from October, Tesh and his orchestra, with Catalina Island as their venue, perform songs from his most recent album, "Avalon."
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By ROGER SIMON | January 31, 1994
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:John O'Neill, Detroit: My pieces appear from time to time next to your column in the Detroit News. My note is prompted by your column regarding the assassination of John Kennedy.I agree with everything you wrote in the piece but take exception to one point: I know the date JFK was born and I do not have to look it up.Unfortunately, you are right, however. Most Americans probably don't know the date of Kennedy's birth. It was May 29, 1917.COMMENT: I sure didn't know it. What strikes me about it is that John Kennedy would be turning 77 this spring.
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By Luaine Lee and Luaine Lee,McClatchy-Tribune News Service | October 17, 2006
PASADENA, Calif. -- An actor doesn't have to live the roles he plays. But it helps. A case in point is Ted Danson who portrays a psychotherapist in ABC's Help Me Help You. His character, Dr. Bill Hoffman, not only has to cope with the neuroses of his colorful patients, he has to confront his own mid-life crisis. Danson, star of such hit shows as Cheers and Becker, admits to having his own hang-ups. "Living with four teenagers who are now four young adults and being married to my wife - you're constantly in a crisis of self-examination," he says.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
Mary Richards, Diane Chambers and Chandler Bing would be aghast. For more than three decades, young television characters have been striking out on their own and finding their adult identities at work or with friends. But this season, TV characters in the their 20s and 30s - some with degrees, a few with jobs, most without - are doing an about-face on the road to adulthood and heading back home to live with - or live off the largesse of - mom and dad. The phenomenon is so common in real life that sociologists have a way to describe it: "Boomerang Generation."
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
An invitation to the first lady's 50th birthday party would have any woman frantically wondering what to wear. The dilemma deepens when the guest also has to transport the present of honor -- a long-haired, four-legged bleating critter -- to the White House."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
An invitation to the first lady's 50th birthday party would have any woman frantically wondering what to wear. The dilemma deepens when the guest also has to transport the present of honor -- a long-haired, four-legged bleating critter -- to the White House."
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun staff | May 24, 1997
"Let me say clearly that I am sorry for my offensive remarks. Or perhaps I should say, for the remarks that were construed as offensive in the context in which they were presented. That is, as offensive statements made by me. I am sorry if the remarks were not taken in the spirit in which they were made, which was certainly not really malicious as references to certain people's personal hygiene go."That part of the entire statement was misunderstood and I apologize for that. In so far as it was taken as a statement about an entire group, I apologize for that also.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1997
The hands-down best thing on TV tonight is a 19-year-old miniseries airing all week on the Family Channel. Beyond that, you're on your own."Cosby" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Hilton takes his wife's advice and enters group therapy, where he ends up giving lots of advice himself, most of it bad. CBS."John Tesh: The Avalon Concert" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 10 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- In a concert from October, Tesh and his orchestra, with Catalina Island as their venue, perform songs from his most recent album, "Avalon."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 3, 1996
American network television has finally figured out a way to make miniseries of nearly the same quality as those British imports seen on PBS and A&E: Hire the Brits.That's what NBC did with "Gulliver's Travels," which premieres tomorrow night on WBAL (Channel 11) at 9 and finishes up at 9 p.m. Monday. Outside of Ted Danson (as Dr. Lemuel Gulliver) and Danson's wife, Mary Steenburgen (as Gulliver's wife, Mary), this production is bursting with Brits, and the result is a crackerjack adaptation of the 18th-century Jonathan Swift satire.
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By Steve McKerrow | February 28, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:WELCOME HOME -- Did you see those unusual promos this week on NBC with Ted Danson (from "Cheers") plugging another show? It's "Down Home," the spring tryout sitcom that returns to the lineup at 9:30 tonight for a preview in the coveted post-"Cheers" slot. Danson is the producer of the series, which stars Judith Ivey as a worldly single woman who has returned to the rustic Texas bait shop run by her father. On the basis of a limited run in the spring, "Down Home" is no "Cheers," at least not yet. But it does have some likable characters (especially Gedde Wanatabe as a Vietnamese cook)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1996
If you watch "Batman" on NBC tonight, keep this in mind: Adam West, who played the bat-guy in the '60s television series, really believes he should have starred in this film. Just try to imagine him in the role."Cosby" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- In a repeat from last month, Hilton has to explain to his wife why there's a nude woman in the bathroom. Good luck. CBS."Dangerous Minds" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Superteacher Louanne grapples with whether to tell James that he'll never make the basketball team a particularly galling situation, given that James has been working extra hard to pull up his grades and make himself eligible for the squad.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 3, 1996
American network television has finally figured out a way to make miniseries of nearly the same quality as those British imports seen on PBS and A&E: Hire the Brits.That's what NBC did with "Gulliver's Travels," which premieres tomorrow night on WBAL (Channel 11) at 9 and finishes up at 9 p.m. Monday. Outside of Ted Danson (as Dr. Lemuel Gulliver) and Danson's wife, Mary Steenburgen (as Gulliver's wife, Mary), this production is bursting with Brits, and the result is a crackerjack adaptation of the 18th-century Jonathan Swift satire.
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