Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTechnology Transfer
IN THE NEWS

Technology Transfer

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | May 20, 2007
Criticizing the Johns Hopkins University's technology-transfer office for its weak track record in moving school inventions to the marketplace is something of a sport in Maryland, particularly for the school's employees. But that reputation is undeserved, said Wesley D. Blakeslee, an intellectual property attorney who's also the 34-year-old office's new head. "Hopkins may not do the best job that Hopkins could do, but this office does a hell of a job," he said. "These people work." During a recent two-hour interview, Blakeslee shed tears over what he called the breadth of faculty brilliance and generosity at the university.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 26, 2007
At nearly $1.5 billion, the Johns Hopkins University led the nation's academic centers in funding for medical, science and engineering research for the 28th straight year in 2006, and it was tops for federally supported research and development, too, according to recent reports. The University of Maryland, Baltimore earned 35th place on the overall list, with $405.2 million, and the University of Maryland, College Park was 43rd with $354.2 million in private and public research dollars.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
It's a pattern state officials say is all-too common: a discovery made in Maryland's vaunted research labs is taken out of state for production, generating jobs and riches somewhere else.Saccharine, the artificial sweetener, was discovered more than a century ago at Johns Hopkins University. A key ingredient of the travel-sickness remedy Dramamine was also developed there. And the pain-reliever Bufferin was made possible by a development at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.All of the products are, however, made out of state.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | May 20, 2007
Criticizing the Johns Hopkins University's technology-transfer office for its weak track record in moving school inventions to the marketplace is something of a sport in Maryland, particularly for the school's employees. But that reputation is undeserved, said Wesley D. Blakeslee, an intellectual property attorney who's also the 34-year-old office's new head. "Hopkins may not do the best job that Hopkins could do, but this office does a hell of a job," he said. "These people work." During a recent two-hour interview, Blakeslee shed tears over what he called the breadth of faculty brilliance and generosity at the university.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
A lawyer brought in last year to revamp commercialization efforts at the Johns Hopkins University, where a faculty survey showed the system "broken and scattered," has resigned after 18 months on the job. Jill Tarzian Sorensen - an intellectual property attorney who once ran technology management at the University of Illinois in Chicago - left her Maryland posts as associate provost and director of the Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer office effective Oct....
NEWS
March 30, 2003
Two Edgewood Chemical Biological Center projects recently won awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for exemplary work in furthering technology transfer. The projects, known as "Design, Development, Training, Fielding and Continued Consultation for Mobile Laboratories" and "Antibody Engineering for Expression in Insect Cells and Larvae," received two of 22 awards distributed nationwide by the federal consortium. Both projects involve application of government-developed technologies to commercial enterprises.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2000
More than a decade ago, Wayne E. Swann traded in his lab coat for a suit and tie. He had spent years in the laboratory, creating products and technologies. But Swann the scientist and inventor was ready to ease into a new role - as businessman and liaison to the corporate world. Today, Swann, 47, is director of technology transfer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel. It is a job he started when the new technology transfer department was formed in July 1999, and with it comes the responsibility of encouraging innovation among his staff members and turning new products into businesses.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
Maryland officials hope AIDS researcher Robert C. Gallo's move to the University of Maryland at Baltimore will spur technical innovation and a wave of new products and local jobs making them, but the university office that guides technology transfer has a much smaller budget and a slimmer track record than counterparts at top universities around the nation.Furthermore, most companies that have received licenses to commercialize products developed at major University of Maryland campuses are not based in Maryland, university figures show.
NEWS
June 28, 2006
HCC to oversee technology grant Howard Community College will serve as the lead institution for a three-year Technology Assessment Program (TAP) grant of $599,491. The program's goal is to expand the infrastructure for innovation in the Baltimore-Washington corridor; it includes an effort to speed technology-transfer from researchers to the private sector. The college is developing a course, "Technology Transfer from Invention to Marketplace," to be offered in the fall through its entrepreneurship program.
NEWS
November 29, 2006
Architect Banta wins Arc's auto raffle Mark D. Banta, president of Banta Campbell Architects Inc. of Columbia, has won the Porsche raffle held recently as a fundraiser for the Arc of Howard County. He selected the $30,000 cash option. Cole Schnorf, president of the Arc's board of directors, sold Banta the winning ticket. Tischer Porsche provided the vehicle at a discount to the Arc. Gray heads APL's tech-transfer office Kristin Gray is the new head of the Office of Technology Transfer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel.
NEWS
November 29, 2006
Architect Banta wins Arc's auto raffle Mark D. Banta, president of Banta Campbell Architects Inc. of Columbia, has won the Porsche raffle held recently as a fundraiser for the Arc of Howard County. He selected the $30,000 cash option. Cole Schnorf, president of the Arc's board of directors, sold Banta the winning ticket. Tischer Porsche provided the vehicle at a discount to the Arc. Gray heads APL's tech-transfer office Kristin Gray is the new head of the Office of Technology Transfer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
Entrepreneurship set as focus Nov. 1. Howard Community College will hold afternoon and evening information sessions Nov. 1 to explore business, career and learning opportunities in entrepreneurship. Sessions will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the college's Burrill Galleria, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. The college's business and computer systems division offers an entrepreneurship studies program and houses the Center for Entrepreneurial and Business Excellence.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
A lawyer brought in last year to revamp commercialization efforts at the Johns Hopkins University, where a faculty survey showed the system "broken and scattered," has resigned after 18 months on the job. Jill Tarzian Sorensen - an intellectual property attorney who once ran technology management at the University of Illinois in Chicago - left her Maryland posts as associate provost and director of the Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer office effective Oct....
NEWS
June 28, 2006
HCC to oversee technology grant Howard Community College will serve as the lead institution for a three-year Technology Assessment Program (TAP) grant of $599,491. The program's goal is to expand the infrastructure for innovation in the Baltimore-Washington corridor; it includes an effort to speed technology-transfer from researchers to the private sector. The college is developing a course, "Technology Transfer from Invention to Marketplace," to be offered in the fall through its entrepreneurship program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 2004
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan barred all scientists working on its nuclear weapons program yesterday from leaving the country, as the government intensified its inquiry into allegations that nuclear technology had been shared with Iran. At the same time, a senior intelligence official said a former army commander had approved the transfer of technology to Iran. The official said the scientist who had led the effort to build an atomic bomb, Abdul Qadeer Khan, had told investigators that any sharing of nuclear technology with Iran had the approval of Gen. Mirza Aslam Beg, the commander of Pakistan's army from 1988 to 1991.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
For Intellitech Inc., yesterday's opening of the MidAtlantic Bio/Med Conference and Exhibition downtown was akin to a debutante attending the annual town ball - and coming away with four marriage proposals. The Westminster company - which over the past year had shifted its business from designing products for others to making machinery for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical markets - wasn't sure what to expect from the trade show visit. Even so, it brought along both versions of its new "I-Fill" in-line filling machines, one priced at $30,000 and the other at $49,500.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 29, 1991
Maryland has been slow to turn its edge in biotechnolog research into new products, companies and jobs, according to a Greater Baltimore Committee report released yesterday.More help is needed to transfer technology discovered at local universities and federal research institutions out of the ivory tower and into the marketplace, the GBC said."This is the decade when things are supposed to take off," said Elizabeth K. Nitze, a consultant who was principal author of the report. In the 1990s, biotech companies nationwide expect to introduce an array of new products based on 1980s research, she said.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
At nearly $1.5 billion, the Johns Hopkins University led the nation's academic centers in funding for medical, science and engineering research for the 28th straight year in 2006, and it was tops for federally supported research and development, too, according to recent reports. The University of Maryland, Baltimore earned 35th place on the overall list, with $405.2 million, and the University of Maryland, College Park was 43rd with $354.2 million in private and public research dollars.
NEWS
March 30, 2003
Two Edgewood Chemical Biological Center projects recently won awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for exemplary work in furthering technology transfer. The projects, known as "Design, Development, Training, Fielding and Continued Consultation for Mobile Laboratories" and "Antibody Engineering for Expression in Insect Cells and Larvae," received two of 22 awards distributed nationwide by the federal consortium. Both projects involve application of government-developed technologies to commercial enterprises.
NEWS
By James J. Zogby | August 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Senate's confirmation of Douglas J. Feith as undersecretary of defense for policy is a classic illustration of the dangerous abuses inherent in the revolving door that operates between government and private industry. Mr. Feith is a political appointee who has used his time in government to build relations that can be used for business purposes, and then returns to government. As the Pentagon's policy chief, his responsibilities include: Developing policy on the conduct of alliances and defense relationships with foreign governments and their military establishments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.