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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Room 118 at Reservoir High School in Fulton is home to a city under glass — Plexiglas, that is. The plastic model of a downtown is complete with a city hall, fire station, mixed-use facilities and courthouse. For the more than 200 students from seven classes who designed the city, it's also a three-dimensional, creative, hands-on respite from other classes. The project is one of several that are the products of Reservoir's technology education program, which uses computer-aided design programs and a 3-D printer to help students create a tangible application of ideas learned in math and science.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | March 4, 2014
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Lt. Gov. Anthony G.  Brown pledged Tuesday to adopt a variety of new educational initiatives that take aim at reducing the achievement gap by extending support to struggling families. The new Brown proposals include placing Latino liaisons in schools that have a large Hispanic population, training teachers to better understand students from diverse cultural backgrounds and expanding the school breakfast program. Several items on the list are initiatives that he has unveiled previously, such as expanding pre-kindergarten and building better school facilities for career and technology education.
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NEWS
By Fay Lande | March 12, 2004
Middle and high school students will participate in the Howard public schools' 10th Technology Education Challenge from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow at Reservoir High School. Technology Education students have worked on projects in their home schools. Those who have created mobile projects, such as miniature cars, planes and robots will compete tomorrow. Students used engineering, design and problem-solving processes in creating their projects. An air-powered dragster (10 inches long and made of wood)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Room 118 at Reservoir High School in Fulton is home to a city under glass — Plexiglas, that is. The plastic model of a downtown is complete with a city hall, fire station, mixed-use facilities and courthouse. For the more than 200 students from seven classes who designed the city, it's also a three-dimensional, creative, hands-on respite from other classes. The project is one of several that are the products of Reservoir's technology education program, which uses computer-aided design programs and a 3-D printer to help students create a tangible application of ideas learned in math and science.
NEWS
March 6, 1998
IF MARY ELLEN DUNCAN arrives at Howard Community College next summer the way she is departing the State University of New York system, the Columbia campus will not starve for the resources it needs as it moves into the 21st century.Dr. Duncan, who was named Tuesday as HCC's first permanent female president, spent the day of her selection lobbying state legislators in Albany for money to support her SUNY campus at Delhi. In seven years at the 1,800-student campus southwest of Albany, she has gained a reputation as an active fund-raiser and imaginative administrator.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
Howard County's popular career and technology program is undergoing another transformation as it strives to meet the evolving needs of students and the work force. In an effort to provide more access and equity, the school system is preparing a comprehensive academy-style career and technology education program that would provide courses at all 12 high schools next year and at the Applications and Research Laboratory in Ellicott City. As a result, this year's sophomore class is the last one participating in the technology magnet program being phased out at Long Reach and River Hill high schools.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
What kind of file allocation does Windows 3.1 have? What is the largest partition Windows 95 will allow on a hard drive? Who is known as the father of computers? When arms started shooting up all over Atholton High School's auditorium, waving madly to answer those and other computer-related questions, it was clear why the school is starting a prestigious Information Technology Academy on its campus. Long known as a Howard County leader in technology education, Atholton formalized its commitment Friday to preparing high school students for careers in computers, business, engineering, architecture and other technology-centered fields.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 1, 1996
EVERY YEAR, among the new students who enter Cliff Feldman's technology classes are a nervous few who are apprehensive about what exactly is behind the lab doors.For these South Carroll High School students, any use of high-tech equipment is scary, especially when it determines whether they will pass or fail the required course.Feldman assures these technophobic students that they "will be better by the end of the semester, not great, but better."He spends the rest of the semester introducing the study of lasers, robotics and computers with practical, hands-on activities.
NEWS
January 5, 1992
The Early Childhood Development Program at Essex Community College has been awarded the Maryland State Department of Education's Award of Excellence for Career and Technology Education for 1991.The award was presented to Dr. Andrew Snope, dean of instruction at Essex, during ceremonies at a meeting of the Maryland Career and Technology Education administrators. Accepting the award with Dr. Snope were Donna Jacobs, associate professor and program coordinator, and Dorothy Wood and Adrienne Koram, associate professors of Early Childhood Education.
NEWS
March 1, 2009
"Taste for Life," a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society with wine-tasting, an auction and entertainment, will be held from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 29 at Ten Oaks Ballroom, 5000 Signal Bell Lane, Clarksville. More than 125 domestic and imported wines will be available to taste. Tickets are $75; a premium tasting will be offered from noon to 1 p.m. Tickets to both tastings are $100. Tickets can be purchased by calling 888-535-4555 or 410-781-4316, going to www.tasteforlife.org, or mailing a check to the American Cancer Society, Attention: Taste for Life/Marge, 1393 Progress Way, Suite 908, Eldersburg 21784.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
It wasn't long into Deaisha Nixon's dental appointment this week that she found herself taking charge. When one dental assistant reached in a pocket for a glove, Nixon noted that they should be using a clean one from a box. And when the suction tube was placed in her mouth for too long, she pointed out that could cause other people's saliva to backwash. "I couldn't believe they didn't know stuff that I had learned in my 10th-grade year," said the Vivien T. Thomas Medical Arts Academy 11th-grader.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 18, 2013
Maj. Gen. Robert S. Ferrell, senior commander at Aberdeen Proving Ground, received the "Military Leader of the Year" award from the Association of Defense Communities during a ceremony in Washington Thursday. Ferrell, commanding general of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, received the award in a breakfast event in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill, according to a news release from the Communications-Electronics Command, which is headquartered at APG. Farrell was one of 10 award recipients from across the country honored by the association, a national membership organization which represents 200 communities, states and regions with a significant military presence, and partner organizations.  "This award recognizes an individual from the military whose outstanding leadership has been essential in building and sustaining partnerships with defense communities," Tim Ford, chief executive officer of the association, said.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
Ryan Twentey, an advance placement photography teacher at Parkville High School and a resident of Bel Air, won $10,000 this week as one of two national honorees of the ASCD 2013 Outstanding Young Educator Award. The award was announced Sunday at the association's 68th annual Conference in Chicago. Twentey said he was "humbled to be recognized for what I enjoy most about teaching: empowering my students with skills to succeed," Twentey said. School officials said that during his 12 years at Parkville High, Twentey has worked on systemwide curriculum projects and served as chairman of Parkville's Career and Technology Education program School officials said Twentey is known for working to help students define, and develop, skills they need for their chosen fields.
NEWS
By Brian Gaines | January 22, 2013
This month Marylanders learned that Education Week had named our state's schools the best in the nation for the fifth year in a row. Credit goes to our students, educators, parents and policy makers for this exciting recognition. But as CEO of a nonprofit dedicated to science education, I would caution against excess celebration. A closer look at recent test scores reveals that we must improve how we educate our students in science, a discipline that is vital to success in the 21st century economy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Joshua A. Barbati, a retired Baltimore County public school educator and longtime Loch Raven resident, died May 11 of melanoma at Levine & Dickson Hospice House in Huntersville, N.C. He was 79. The son of Italian immigrants, Mr. Barbati was born in Bristol, Conn., and raised in Meriden, Conn., and New Haven, where he graduated in 1953 from James Hillhouse High School. He was a 1960 graduate of Central Connecticut State College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in technology education.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley made a rare appearance at the state school board meeting Tuesday to welcome the new state school superintendent, Lillian M. Lowery, and encourage the members to work harder on preparing principals and providing vocational training to students. The state board voted unanimously to hire Lowery, who is Delaware's secretary of education. She will begin July 1. Lowery attended the board meeting, sitting next to the interim state school superintendent, Bernard Sadusky, but did not participate in the discussion, which centered on several key issues, including the adjustment to new set of high school exams in the coming years.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
Book fair set for Nov. 10 The 11th annual Random House Book Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 10 at Carroll Community College. Local authors are invited to participate in the event. Applications can be downloaded from www.carrollcc.edu. Forms and a registration fee of $25 must be returned by Wednesday to the Carroll Community College Foundation Office at 1601 Washington Road, Westminster, Md. 21157. Local artisans and non-profit organizations also can participate as exhibitors.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
Adult single parents, displaced homemakers and single pregnant womenresiding in Anne Arundel County may be entitled to a tuition assistance grant from the Maryland Department of Education, Division of Careers and Technology Education.The Annapolis YWCA recently was awarded this grant and will use it to help pay for up to 18 credit or non-credit hours with a limit of three courses per semester. Assistance can include tuition, books and associated fees. To qualify, courses must be career-related and directed toward a specific career goal.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Several months after Nancy S. Grasmick left her job as state superintendent of schools, Michelle Rhee, the former schools chief in Washington, spoke in Baltimore and let a secret slip. She told the crowd at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that Grasmick had said she wanted her next job to be helping to revamp the way teachers are prepared for the profession. Rhee, a hard-line education reformer, was pleased that Grasmick might help improve the training that Rhee thinks is so lacking in teacher colleges.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
For all they know, Reservoir High School juniors Avery Strott and Colleen Paraska might be taking classes with members of the family that they're helping with necessities like food and clothes for the holidays and beyond. The family's single mother, with whom they've spoken over the phone, could be someone they've passed time and again, at food courts, in a doctor's office, at school events. The two girls are not allowed to know the identity of the family they're sponsoring as part of their community service project for their school branch of Distributive Education Clubs of America Inc., a Reston, Va.-based nonprofit organization that prepares students worldwide for work in marketing, finance, hospitality and management.
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