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Technology Center

NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1999
In response to complaints about the management of Harford County's multimillion-dollar technology center, County Executive James M. Harkins has appointed a high economic development official to work as liaison between the center and his administration.Robert Infussi, the county's deputy director of economic development, moved last week into an office at the Higher Education and Applied Technology Center (HEAT) near Aberdeen, and was to begin the job of increasing business participation and presence at the center.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
Scents of cinnamon wafted through the halls of Liberty High School yesterday as Mark Stafford and Dave Felter created pate choux pastry in the school lobby."
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
When a pharmaceutical company acquired an Owings Mills drug firm about four years ago, about 100 people worked there. Shire Pharmaceuticals has since expanded and brought another 150 jobs to Baltimore County. Yesterday, the company announced another expansion. Company officials joined by politicians, fireworks and shimmering golden streamers unveiled a multimillion-dollar building designed, in part, to improve manufacturing efficiency. The $6 million Pharmaceutical Technology Center is 19,000 square feet.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
When Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health faculty member Dr. Paul Ts'o went hunting for office and lab space to launch a cancer testing company, he found the most agreeable spot across town -- at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in Catonsville.Ts'o's company, Cell Works Inc., is one of 21 small firms and training institutes that have taken up residence on campus as part of a gamble UMBC and the state are taking in developing a technology center and research park.They aren't alone.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
Sykesville Mayor Jonathan S. Herman said yesterday he may have a tenant for one of the Warfield Complex buildings and asked the County Commissioners for their help in planning the future of the 138-acre property.The state recently deeded the Warfield Complex, once part of Springfield Hospital Center, to the town of 3,500 residents. Sykesville officials hope to make the complex the cornerstone for economic development in South Carroll."Warfield holds enormous potential for development," Herman said, asking for county support to develop and market the site.
BUSINESS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
The Board of Public Works approved a $1 million state grant yesterday to help develop an "emerging technology center" at the former American Can Co. complex in Baltimore's Canton neighborhood.The state grant will help pay for improvements to 50,000 square feet of space in one of the complex's buildings. It will serve as a center for entrepreneurs developing new businesses in telecommunications and other high technology fields, officials said.The grant was made to the quasi-public Maryland Economic Development Corp.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
Coppin State College has been given more than a quarter-million dollars by the philanthropic arm of AT&T Corp. to create a center to train city teachers in the technology touted as the future of American education.The gift, worth about $275,000, is one of the largest in the history of the West Baltimore campus, and it is the largest donation ever made by the New Jersey-based AT&T Foundation to a historically black college."It's going to be very helpful," Coppin State President Calvin W. Burnett said.
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
In the past several months, five technology companies have moved into the business incubator at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The techcenter@UMBC has become a magnet for startups enticed by its location and the university's facilities and resources. The newest resident, software products company AVIcode Inc., joins more than 30 tenants in the 170,000-square-foot, five-building technology incubator adjacent to the UMBC campus. The center provides office and laboratory space, shared scientific equipment, business advisory services and the potential for collaboration between companies and UMBC faculty.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | April 17, 1991
By all accounts, they were good friends.The first was older, a high school graduate with a good-paying job at United Parcel Service.The second was a 17-year-old high school student who excelled in the machine shop at Carroll County Career and Technology Center.Matthew Leigh Frock, 24, of the first block of Old Westminster Road inHanover, Pa., and Richard Earl Uphoff Jr., of the 5100 block of Old Hanover Road in Westminster, spent a lot of their free time together."Matt thought of Ricky as a brother," said Diane Frock, Matt's 34-year-old sister.
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