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NEWS
September 18, 2012
One of your readers recently wrote that "speed limits were developed before" power steering, anti-lock brakes, and other technological improvements in vehicles. The implication by that writer was that speed limits could be increased now, and that speed cameras were not needed. While it is true that, technologically, vehicles have had all kinds of safety improvements done by engineers and factories over the years, what remains in effect are the laws of physics. A 2-ton piece of metal traveling at 60 mph will still require a certain amount of minimum distance in order to come to a halt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
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NEWS
June 18, 2012
Your editorial "Getting down to brass tags" (June 14) left out a few facts that might give your readers a clearer view of the value of adding microstamping technology to pistols as a way of tracing spent shell-casings found at crime scenes to a particular handgun. Independent studies by the National Academy of Science, by the University of California at Davis, and by George Krivosta of the American Society of Firearm and Toolmark Examiners concluded the technology is underdeveloped, producing inaccurate results that are easily circumvented, either on purpose or by simple use of the firearm within a few number of rounds fired.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Kathleen M. Happ, a retired Anne Arundel Community College educator who ws an active member of Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church on Bolton Hill, died Sept. 19 of lung cancer at Villages Hospice in The Villages, Fla. A former resident of the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood, Ms. Happ was 69. "Kathy was a truly remarkable and exceedingly talented professional. She had integrity, was always positive and a professional in her field," said Martha A. "Marty" Smith, who headed the college from 1994 until 2012, when she retired.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2012
Valedictorian: Ankur Vaidya Salutatorian: Boris Boiko Omar Abdelnaby, Tasnem Abukhdeir, Olalekan Adams, Jacob Adcock, Shirri Ade, Mabel Aina, Kathleen Ako, Gregory Alegbe, Tolulope Alegbeleye, Christina Allen, Jhane' Allen, Imari Alvarez, Mark Asefaw, Beverly Atueyi Sade Bagley, Jasmin Bailey, Mariah Bailey, Omar Ballesteros, Carly Barklow, Ciante Barr, Markus Beasley, Kabria Bennett, Siham Beshir, Darlene Bishop,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
Kenny Irwin Jr. has seen the future, and it is fast and fierce - intergalactic travelers catching flights from an Afghan spaceport, extraterrestrials so weary of human warfare they swoop down and blast away our weapons. The 39-year-old artist says he has had as many as 60,000 visions in which he is spirited to far corners of the galaxy and ferried around by beings who "have such advanced technological capabilities ... they know we're here. " Irwin's meticulously shaded ballpoint-pen drawings of futuristic battles and his jangly, blinking installation "Have Yourself a Happy Little Robotmas" form the heart of the American Visionary Art Museum 's 19th themed exhibit, "Human, Soul and Machine: The Coming Singularity," which opened Saturday and continues through August.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Pixelligent Technologies LLC will relocate its headquarters and manufacturing facility to Baltimore from College Park with the help of a $200,000 loan from the Baltimore Development Corp. The company, which manufactures nanocrystal additives for the electronics and semiconductor markets, will move into the Holabird Business Park. The Baltimore Board of Estimates approved the five-year loan with a 5 percent interest rate at a meeting Wednesday. Pixelligent said it plans to employ 25 people by the end of the year and 150 by the end of 2015.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Apple CEO Steve Jobs was an inspiring man who changed the we look at technology. Virtually every project he created was a world-class success. His 2007 iPod changed the way we listen to music; his iPhone put a computer in customers' hand. And his iPad notebook bids fair to make laptop computers obsolete. Mr. Jobs made the lives of millions of people easier. He will go down in history as one of the greatest technology innovators and product designers of our time. Jeffrey Lowe
NEWS
By Mark C. Blom | January 1, 2012
It's getting harder for a public school teacher to reach excellence. By "excellence," I mean being responsible for helping each student significantly develop his or her knowledge or learning capacity. This increased difficulty is not the fault of teachers. Rather, teaching now requires mastering two seemingly opposite responsibilities: developing the best and the brightest to regain America's educational standing in the world, while ensuring that each student learns the basic competencies assessed by state and federal testing - and applying them to classes increasingly diverse in a host of educational factors.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
The O'Malley administration is proposing a regulation that in most of the state would require builders of new homes using septic systems to install more costly models that reduce water pollution. The Maryland Department of the Environment acknowledges that the requirement could add thousands of dollars to the cost of a new home. Maryland builders contend that the added cost is not justified by scientific findings. The proposal would accomplish by regulation a goal that environmental advocates tried to achieve in 2009 through legislation: to require use of the new technology virtually statewide.
BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The circle of political power brokers and deep-pocketed investors hatched their plan more than three years ago, seeing promise in a project deemed wildly unrealistic by some and stubbornly unattainable by others. With billions in backing from the Japanese government, the Northeast Maglev group envisions building a futuristic magnetic levitation or "maglev" train capable of transporting Baltimore homeowners to Washington jobs in 15 minutes, at speeds above 300 mph. Plenty in Maryland think it will never happen or shouldn't, given the price tag in excess of $10 billion.
NEWS
By Matthew Bobrowsky | September 26, 2014
Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope - given our increasingly technological society - scientific research and science education are high on the list. The development of innovations and new products, particularly in medicine and electronics, depends heavily on scientific research. Besides expanding the sum of human knowledge, federally funded scientific research grows our economy and improves the quality of life for all Americans.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
Baltimore's top lawyer said Wednesday that the state's attorney's office has partnered with the city inspector general to investigate allegations that the Mayor's Office of Information Technology paid contractual employees for work they didn't perform. City Solicitor George A. Nilson, who supervises city Inspector General Robert H. Pearre Jr., confirmed that Baltimore prosecutors are now involved in the probe. "They have been working together," Nilson said. "I do know that the investigation is not 100 percent complete.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Atwater's will open a restaurant at the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, an 88-acre mixed-use science campus under development in Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood.  Atwater's will take over the space in the Rangos Building that had been Cuban Revolution, which closed late last year. Opened in February 2013, Cuban Revolution was the first new restaurant to open in the emerging district, which is being developed by the Forest City-New East Baltimore Partnership.   The new restaurant will have its formal opening in early October but will be open for business sometime in mid-September, according to a spokesman for the Forest City Enterprises, Inc. This will be the sixth location for Ned Atwater's Catonsville-based group of cafes and markets.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2014
Through stunning advances in technology, guns are becoming more accurate and deadlier. They are also becoming safer. Crazy as it might seem, gun-rights activists are excited about the former, but opposed to the latter. The gun-obsessed might admire computerized, laser-based rifle scopes that turn amateurs into master snipers at 1,200 yards, but offer them "smart gun" technology that limits a firearm's use to its rightful owner and they get surly. Apparently, gun lovers think such a safety feature might become mandatory and, as we all know, anything mandatory constitutes a threat to their absolute Second Amendment rights to bear whatever guns they wish, public safety be damned.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
One minute, Anne Mekalian's brain is telling her prosthetic arm to unstack a set of multicolored plastic cones, and the shiny black metal limb is listening. Every now and then, the plastic clatters to the table, but quickly the cones are separated and restored to a neat pile. The next moment, though, the bionic hand doesn't know what to make of slight muscle movements in Mekalian's forearm, interpreted through a set of electrodes touching the skin on the rounded remnant limb that extends just below her elbow.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is giving Planned Parenthood of Maryland a $200,000 grant to invest in technology at its eight clinics. Planned Parenthood will use the money to invest in a two-year project to build a new electronic management system. The money will be awarded Wednesday at the group's 9th Annual Spring Gala at the Four Seasons Hotel in Baltimore. andrea.walker@baltsun.com Twitter.com/ankwalker
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Law enforcement agencies in the Baltimore area and across the country are researching drones, intrigued by their potential for high-risk tactical raids and gathering intelligence. But uncertainty over federal regulations, concern about privacy issues and other factors have slowed many agencies from acquiring the unmanned aircraft. "There are still many unanswered questions into the future of drone use and how the [Federal Aviation Administration] will regulate those efforts," said Harford County sheriff's office spokeswoman Cristie Kahler.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and For The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In August 2006, Millennial Media -- a digital advertising company founded in Baltimore just two months prior -- made a move that shaped its future. The company's three co-founders took up office space inside the Emerging Technology Center (ETC), an incubator of startup technology companies that opened its doors in the Signature Building of the Can Company complex in Canton in 1999. Two years later, when Millennial Media moved out of the ETC and into the complex's adjacent Factory Building in October 2008, it was a company of 85 full-time employees.
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