Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTechnique
IN THE NEWS

Technique

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
The pain and bleeding was so bad the last year that she would have had a hysterectomy even if it meant the standard two months of recovery.But three weeks after her doctor removed her uterus using a special instrument, Joan Stickles feels ready to return to her job tomorrow. The three tiny surgical incisions required no more than one staple each and a few Band-Aids the next day, she said."If I'd had a regular hysterectomy, I'd be laid up six to eight weeks," Stickles said. "I'm ecstatic about it."
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
No parent wants to be in a position to use it, but child-safety experts agree that learning infant and child CPR is a must for every mother and father. "It's one skill that just doesn't come naturally to caregivers. It's a learned technique," says Lanny Dowell, Greater Baltimore Medical Center's parent education and doula coordinator. Courses are offered by many local hospitals and through the American Red Cross. First aid for choking is also taught in CPR classes. And some are combined with training on using defibrillators or with adult CPR. While parents can watch a video for instruction, it's helpful to practice on a mannequin, experts say. "Most people learn by doing," says Sarah Sherman, training center coordinator for the American Heart Association at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 18, 1990
Doctors at the University of Maryland Hospital have begun using expandable "balloons" -- the same technology used to unclog arteries and repair heart valves -- as a tool for draining fluid that often accumulates around the hearts of cancer patients.Physicians there said yesterday that they are experimenting with the technique to see if it is capable of replacing the surgery for most or all patients hampered by fluid buildup around the heart.The technique, involving the insertion of a single needle through the abdominal wall, is part of medicine's continued drift toward lower-cost, non-surgical solutions to illnesses traditionally treated with surgery and lengthy hospital stays.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
At first, Baldwin Homes didn't build green. Then it dipped its corporate toe in - one home here, another there. Now the Gambrills company is constructing an entire green neighborhood. It's the story of U.S. home building writ small. Green accounted for 2 percent of the new-home market in 2005, according to a report by industry data provider McGraw Hill Construction. By last year it had ballooned to 23 percent - nearly a quarter. "I don't think green is a niche market anymore," said Michele A. Russo, director of green content at McGraw Hill Construction.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 9, 1991
Ruth Laredo's piano recital last night in Shriver Hall offered some of the most highly colored music ever written for her instrument: three mazurkas by Chopin, a Scriabin group that included the orgasmic Ninth Sonata (the so-called "Black Mass"), and Iberian music by Albeniz and de Falla. The only classical work was Beethoven's Sonata No. 23 ("Appassionata"), one of the most torrid pieces in the repertory.Unfortunately, the prerequisite for such a program is coloristic imagination and ability.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 22, 1993
Will Wilson is an artist of almost consummate technical ability. He can do a trompe l'oeil painting, such as "Back to the Drawing Board" in his current show at the Baltimore Life Gallery, and make it look so real you think you could go up and pull those thumbtacks right out of that piece of wood.In "Painting" (presumably a self-portrait, since Wilson's name is on the easel the figure holds), he surrounds the central face with various creatures from birds and mice to bees and butterflies, snails and a snake; everything is rendered in extreme detail, down to the single hair, a prodigious tour de force.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
All eyes are fastened on teacher Mary McKnight-Brown. It is quiet in the first-grade classroom at Dasher Green Elementary.But when she moves her hand slightly, 24 first-graders suddenly erupt into fierce whispering. As she makes another signal, the children become quiet, eager to share answers.One doesn't hear many verbal reprimands from Ms. McKnight-Brown, who will be featured next month on a national program about innovative teaching.Instead of commanding her students to "sit down," or "be quiet," the Columbia teacher uses hand signals to communicate.
BUSINESS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | July 11, 1993
Meshing old-world techniques with modern technology, Glenn James feels he's found his niche in the world.A Westminster builder who specializes in timber-frame homes built without nails, Mr. James said that the ancient technique -- used in colonial homes that still stand today -- fits in with the ideals he embraced in the 1960s."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
Ever seen a green steak?You probably never will. But in the figurative sense, the choice cuts from Lawrason Sayre's Angus herd bear the universal color of environmental protection.Since 1987, the 65-year-old Churchville farmer has been converting his traditional beef-cattle operation to one based on a feeding technique used extensively in New Zealand. The technique, called "rotational grazing," helps protect Mill Branch and other sensitive streams that lace through his Waffle Hill Farm and flow toward the Chesapeake Bay.Mr.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
The solution to the Ravens' defensive slide in October is not in changing players or schemes, Jarret Johnson says. It is in practicing, and perfecting, existing techniques. "It's no one player, it's no one position," the veteran linebacker said Tuesday. "Everybody's made enough mistakes across the board to get us in the situation we're in. ... We've got to understand the games we've been in, [if] you make a mistake, that might be the play that costs the team the game. You don't want to be that person.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Youngsters at a summer vocal camp in Howard County are learning the importance of bending their knees when they sing, lest they get dizzy, become queasy and pass out. Who knew something as simple as posture could derail a performance before you even bellow a note? That's just one tip youngsters learned this past week at the summer camp, offered by the county Recreation and Parks department and held at Mount Hebron High School. The weeklong vocal camp is among several hosted each summer by Recreation and Parks officials for preteens and teens looking to sharpen their performance skills.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
When Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's gubernatorial campaign wanted to make sure that likely primary voters saw a video ad, his staff didn't rely solely on television stations to deliver the message. They also arranged for it to run on the computer screens of individuals the campaign believes are all but certain to turn out at the polls. And when volunteers for Attorney General Douglas Gansler's campaign walk through a neighborhood to meet with voters, they visit homes identified by computer modeling that predicts - before the doorbell is rung - how strong a supporter the person on the other side of the threshold might be. The Democrats and Republicans running in Maryland's June 24 gubernatorial primary are embracing increasingly sophisticated digital targeting techniques that allow candidates to single out voters and aim specialized ads - as well as personal contacts - directly at them.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Walter G. Amprey was driving his wife, Andrea, home from a restaurant one night last December when he turned onto an on-ramp for the Baltimore Beltway. A sudden dizziness overcame him. He blacked out. The family SUV ran off the road and rolled into a tree. The pair survived, but Amprey had suffered severe heart failure. It would take a team of surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center - and a new operating-room technique - to give him his best chance for a full and rapid recovery.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
When I trim my shrubs, they seem to go crazy, with new branches growing in all directions. My neighbor's shrubs never do that. They look natural and graceful. How come? Pruning stimulates new growth, but you can control the direction of the growth. When you prune, cut back to just above a leaf bud. The trick is to select a leaf bud that is pointing in whatever direction you want growth to go. A bud pointing away from the plant will go outward from the plant. A bud pointing to the shrub's interior or toward a neighboring branch will get entangled and run into other branches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
When the CIA's chief lawyer, John Rizzo, first came across the term "enhanced interrogation technique" shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, he was struck by the phrase's deceptive blandness. The words sounded mild, possibly even salutary. But Rizzo knew they referred to the harshest methods used to elicit information from suspected terrorists in custody, including waterboarding, which mimics the experience of drowning. For Rizzo and others, the "EITs", as they were called, were repugnant but necessary for ensuring the nation's safety.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | January 8, 2014
Anne Marie Kellner signed up for a painting class in Ellicott City thinking she would wind up creating a piece of art to hang on her wall. She left the three-hour Chalk Paint tutorial with much larger aspirations. “I'm considering repainting my kitchen cabinets,” Kellner, of Halethorpe, says after taking the class taught by Kelli Myers, the owner of A Journey from Junk. “I went in thinking I would learn a very specific skill, but got a much larger picture of what it's able to do.” Chalk Paint, produced by the Annie Sloan company, creates a vintage-style matte finish.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 1, 1996
Michael Monroe talks with admiration bordering on affection about Gary Schlappal's big ceramic piece that hovers between human and vessel form."This takes the vessel as a form, but transforms it," says Monroe. "It becomes a canvas for the artist, who has drawn, incised, added layering of paint. He has used the vessel form as a background on which to decorate in a painterly way, but this is also an excellent example of the artist integrating surface decoration with the form. Some artists are just facile, painting on top of the form.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 26, 1994
"Natural Born Killers" is about as "natural" as Natural Lite Beer or naturally mentholated cigarettes.In your face like a drunk with a bad attitude problem, the movie hammers, yammers, blurts and blasts. There's not a single moment of repose or reflection; it grabs you by the lapels and sprays saliva in your face for two and a half hours.Oliver Stone thinks he's making a satire, but he has no idea what a satire actually is. The point being made, under the coarse bombast, would seem to have something to do with that modern bugbear that has replaced "the system" as the generic target of opportunity for blowhards, "the media."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Ask first-year teachers what their greatest challenge is, and they are likely to say it has been managing squirming elementary students or keeping sleepy teenagers engaged. But too few universities that train the next generation of teachers are giving them a foundation in effective classroom management techniques, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality, a research advocacy group, which highlighted St. Mary's College of Maryland as one of the best in the nation.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Recent brushes with snow have highlighted a new way to communicate wintry weather forecasts in the Baltimore area -- providing more detail on the range of possibilities for a snowfall, rather than a single best guess of accumulations. The National Weather Service's Baltimore/Washington forecast office is running a pilot of a winter weather forecasting system that describes the minimum and maximum potential of a snowy system. In addition, the office's winter weather page details probabilities of any given amount of snow accumulation at cities and towns across the state and region.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.