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April 5, 2000
Donny Osmond sings the title role in "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat," the musical adaptation of the biblical tale from Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Continuing in this "PBS Showcase" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) is Lloyd Webber's "Requiem" with Placido Domingo. PBS. At a glance "The West Wing" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- An arrest at a frat party could pose problems for the president's daughter; the staff celebrates the confirmation of their Supreme Court nominee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Bruce Joel Rubin, who won an Academy Award for his screenplay for the 1990 hit movie "Ghost," did not feel a compelling need to revisit the work. Not long after the film's release - it went on to earn half a billion dollars worldwide - Paramount Pictures asked Rubin to write a sequel to the story of a young man named Sam who, after being murdered during a mugging, hangs around in ectoplasmic form to keep his beloved Molly from danger. Rubin resisted the studio's overtures. "I really didn't know where to take it," he says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2001
Jack Cardiff, at age 87, is the first cinematographer to receive an honorary Academy Award - it's usually bestowed on stars like Kirk Douglas and directors such as Alfred Hitchcock. Cardiff has earned it. He pioneered the use of Technicolor as a vast expressive palette when others looked on it as eye candy. He worked with poetic intuition, proving that Technicolor's intricate light-splitting camera and three strips of film could achieve the limpidity of Old Masters, or the undulating shades of the impressionists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
If you love hearing Martin Scorsese talk movies, don't miss "Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff. " Craig McCall's tip-top documentary centers on the cinematographer who turned Technicolor into an incomparably vivid and fluid palette with movies like "Pandora and the Flying Dutchman" and "The Barefoot Contessa. " (It plays at the AFI Silver at 2:45 p.m. Saturday and 8 p.m. Monday.) No one is more passionate than Scorsese at paying tribute to fellow artists like Cardiff and his most influential collaborators, the writing-directing-producing team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (aka "the Archers")
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 7, 1996
It's summer, so crank up the machine. The Talent Machine, that is.Bobbi Smith's award-winning Talent Machine Company, which has provided us with some of the finest entertainment we've seen in seasons past, opens this season on June 16 with two reprise performances of last summer's production of "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" by Andrew Lloyd Webber.Talent Machine's Justin Brill will star again as the biblical hero who sported that famous coat of many colors, while Karen Zucco, formerly of Arundel High School and now a sophomore at Hartt College of Music in Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
Virginia Mayo, whose honey blond hair and creamy, flawless face had made her ideal for the Technicolor musicals, westerns and adventures so popular in the 1940s and 1950s, died Monday in Thousand Oaks, Calif. She was 84. Rising from chorus girl to film star almost overnight, she went on to appear opposite many of the most popular actors of her time. Although many of her films were escapist fare, she landed two solid dramatic roles - in 1946's The Best Years of Our Lives and 1949's White Heat.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 17, 1996
They found "Gone With the Wind."And you didn't even know it was lost? Well, prints of the original 1939 acetate-base, Technicolor dye version have self-destructed over the years, infuriating purists the world over. What's been shown since the 50-year "restoration" of 1989 is a version whose brighter, more modern colors did not match the original palette of the Selznick production.But in a salt mine in Kansas, someone has discovered what has to be the closest version to the original Technicolor release print in 1939, a nearly perfect acetate Technicolor print evidently struck in 1966 for one videotaping.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 14, 1991
In a clever bit of counter-marketing, the bright lad who runs Ye Olde Senator Theater has located a newly struck Technicolor print of Ye Olde "Adventures of Robin Hood," from 1938, with the Prince of Knaves himself, the original swashbuckler, Errol FIn a clever bit of counter-marketing, the bright lad who runs Ye Olde Senator Theater has located a newly struck Technicolor print of Ye Olde "Adventures of Robin Hood," from 1938, with the Prince of Knaves himself,...
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
Marylanders have grown almost blase about the presence of Hollywood movie and television production companies filming on city streets or in towns across the state. Seeing actress Julia Roberts having dinner in the bar at Sotto Sopra on North Charles Street while filming "Runaway Bride," or sharing the aisles at Graul's Market in Ruxton with Ned Beatty, former star of "Homicide: Life on the Street," is no longer a big deal. The excitement of streets crowded with Haddad Co. movie supply trucks and portable dressing rooms or sidewalks littered with klieg lights and racks of costumes and props has definitely worn off for most Marylanders.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 24, 1994
Once upon a time, all that got shot in Times Square was craps, low lifes had high-sounding monikers like "Nicely-Nicely," and a dame could be called a doll without alerting the political correctness cops.OK. Maybe that was never-never land, but you can have an old-fashioned good time visiting it at the Lyric Opera House, where "Guys and Dolls" is happily ensconced for the next three weeks.Winner of the 1992 Tony Award for best revival, this snappy production, directed by Jerry Zaks, pulls off the difficult combination of being fresh at the same time that it is reverent to Frank Loesser, Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows' musical comedy based on Damon Runyon's fabled Broadway characters.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
Virginia Mayo, whose honey blond hair and creamy, flawless face had made her ideal for the Technicolor musicals, westerns and adventures so popular in the 1940s and 1950s, died Monday in Thousand Oaks, Calif. She was 84. Rising from chorus girl to film star almost overnight, she went on to appear opposite many of the most popular actors of her time. Although many of her films were escapist fare, she landed two solid dramatic roles - in 1946's The Best Years of Our Lives and 1949's White Heat.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 8, 2004
ON THE DAY of his first presidential inauguration, Ronald Reagan invited the whole country into his new White House digs, in a way we had never gone there before. We were accustomed to Jimmy Carter, in his cardigan sweaters, fretting gloomily over America's malaise during our long national winter. Now we had Reagan all dressed up like New Year's Eve, lifting a glass of champagne and inviting everybody to drink along with him. Some of us watched this on a TV screen in a little downtown lunchroom, barely pausing between sandwiches and gossip to listen to Reagan's address.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2004
The first collaboration of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, began its life in March 1968 in a London school as a 15-minute musical. Later expanded to 90 minutes, Joseph went through several New York and London transitions before opening in June 1991 at London's Palladium, where it was seen by more than 2 million people during its two-year run. Done in songs that blend ballad, rock, calypso and country, Webber and Rice's Joseph retells the Old Testament tale of Jacob's favorite son Joseph and his 11 jealous brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
BY MICHAEL SRAGOW and BY MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2002
You want to learn how to stop worrying and love the Oscars? Do what I do every year: As soon as you hear the fanfare, close your eyes, shut off your mind and think back to your childhood. In my childhood, being a suburban kid in the age before multiplex cinemas had its advantages and disadvantages. On one hand, you didn't get to see many movies. Then again, when you did see them, they were on screens the size of a football field, and they'd been so prodigiously promoted that they were terrific events regardless of their quality as movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2001
Jack Cardiff, at age 87, is the first cinematographer to receive an honorary Academy Award - it's usually bestowed on stars like Kirk Douglas and directors such as Alfred Hitchcock. Cardiff has earned it. He pioneered the use of Technicolor as a vast expressive palette when others looked on it as eye candy. He worked with poetic intuition, proving that Technicolor's intricate light-splitting camera and three strips of film could achieve the limpidity of Old Masters, or the undulating shades of the impressionists.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2001
Not for nothing has "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" become the dinner theater musical, par excellence. Glitzy and colorful to a fault, the fanciful tale of the Bible's most famous interpreter of dreams and his multicolored coat doesn't require all that much in the way of sets and scenery - which makes it perfect for the irregular nooks and crannies in which dinner theater thespians ply their trade. Also, "Joseph" is so beloved by theater folk that, I dare say, most casts walk into the first rehearsal knowing the show cold.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 6, 2001
IT LOOKED like the curtain was about to go up on another Bobbi Smith musical. The kids from her Talent Machine Company were manning the doors of Key Auditorium on the campus of St. John's College Sunday night, wearing the trademark Talent Machine T-shirts and passing out programs. In the lobby, familiar parents and familiar kids chatted and air-kissed, waiting to take their seats. Talent Machine mothers worked behind the refreshment tables, just like always. But something in the air betrayed the evening's real purpose.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 22, 1994
In the last three decades of her life, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis withdrew into public silence and left those of a certain age to remember her in that instant when our hearts were all breaking.In Dallas, with her husband dying in her lap, she cried, "Jack, what have they done to you?" By "they," she might have meant all of us who live in this brawling, embattled nation, which seems the very antithesis of such a reserved and dignified woman.In her 31-year cocoon of privacy, which sometimes felt like an extended silent treatment imposed by a mother whose boisterous child has misbehaved, she achieved the modern impossible: She was a public figure who could have had the embrace of the world, but decided she didn't want it. By the age of 34, she'd already had too much of it and didn't wish to remember what she'd seen.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 6, 2001
IT LOOKED like the curtain was about to go up on another Bobbi Smith musical. The kids from her Talent Machine Company were manning the doors of Key Auditorium on the campus of St. John's College Sunday night, wearing the trademark Talent Machine T-shirts and passing out programs. In the lobby, familiar parents and familiar kids chatted and air-kissed, waiting to take their seats. Talent Machine mothers worked behind the refreshment tables, just like always. But something in the air betrayed the evening's real purpose.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
The Marsh family doesn't have quite as many children as the biblical figure Jacob, but you wouldn't be able to tell that on Glenelg High School's stage. That's because six of the seven Marsh children are taking part in the school's multigrade production of "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" this week. The show, which includes pupils from the area's five elementary and two middle schools, is the brainchild of Glenelg's drama teacher Sue Leader."`Joseph' is a show that people of all ages love," Leader said.
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