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NEWS
June 7, 2014
In a news brief concerning the drowning of a young man in Ocean City , The Sun used the term Ocean City Beach Patrol "rescue technician" ( "Teen dies after getting caught in Ocean City riptide," June 3). It was unclear whether that term originated with the town of Ocean City 's news release or The Sun's writer. It was probably the former, but no matter. Please, say it isn't so. Bernard Haske, Catonsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 3, 2014
This week, millions of young people head to college and universities, aiming for a four-year liberal arts degree. They assume that degree is the only gateway to the American middle class. It shouldn't be. For one thing, a four-year liberal arts degree is hugely expensive. Too many young people graduate laden with debts that take years if not decades to pay off. And too many of them can't find good jobs when they graduate, in any event. So they have to settle for jobs that don't require four years of college.
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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s newest power plant, which will be switched on Thursday, is driven by computers and two technicians.The power plant, near four of BGE's oil-powered plants in Perryman, is one of a new wave of generators that use natural gas as their primary fuel. More expensive oil is used only as a backup. This makes the power plant, called Perryman Unit 51, cheaper to operate than older oil-burning plants.The new power plant is designed to provide electricity during peak times, for example the hottest summer days, when air conditioners are turned to their highest settings, said Peter Buote, project manager.
NEWS
June 7, 2014
In a news brief concerning the drowning of a young man in Ocean City , The Sun used the term Ocean City Beach Patrol "rescue technician" ( "Teen dies after getting caught in Ocean City riptide," June 3). It was unclear whether that term originated with the town of Ocean City 's news release or The Sun's writer. It was probably the former, but no matter. Please, say it isn't so. Bernard Haske, Catonsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
Some Comcast customers lost access to cable TV service in the Baltimore area on Thursday morning, as a result of "technical issues related to a piece of equipment," according to spokeswoman Alisha Martin. Video service has been disrupted for some Baltimore area customers since shortly after midnight, Martin said, and customer relations lines have been jammed since 3 a.m. Martin said she did not have a figure for exactly how many customers were affected. She said some customers have had their service restored already, and technicians are working "through the morning to restore service for all remaining customers as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
Before Fort Meade's Tipton Airfield can be turned into the Baltimore region's newest civilian airport, the Army has a lot of blowing up to do.Moving inch by inch, 41 munitions technicians are sweeping hand-held metal detectors across the airfield in what looks -- from a distance -- like a retiree beach outing.But the technicians are probing for unexploded shells, mortars and grenades used during range training from 1917 to 1950."They were all, at one point, designed to kill people. They still can," says Richard Johnson, the project manager for Human Factors Applications, the private bomb-locater company hired for the $2.5 million cleanup.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | August 19, 1997
Two state employees who were gathering water samples in the lower Pocomoke River have developed health problems that appear to be related to exposure to the toxic microorganism Pfiesteria piscicida, state officials said yesterday.The two are lab technicians who were splashed in the waters off Shelltown while aboard small boats, said Robert M. Summers, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.A 4.5-mile stretch of the lower Pocomoke River near Shelltown was closed as a health precaution for almost a week because of a significant fish kill.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A billion-dollar air traffic control system that is scheduled to start service next spring will jeopardize air safety, according to the union representing the technicians who will maintain it, because it lacks alarms and monitoring systems to warn when it is beginning to fail.In addition, the Federal Aviation Administration is not sure the new software, which will not enter service until 1999 at the earliest, will function properly after the calendar rolls over to 2000.The union, the Professional Airways Systems Specialists, is seeking a delay in the phase-in, which is scheduled to begin in March 1999 at Reagan National Airport near Washington.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2004
With some crime victims in Baltimore County waiting more than an hour for the arrival of evidence collection teams, police officers are filling jobs that had been done by civilians. County police officials say that they are reluctant to take officers out of precinct stations but that the loss of several civilian employees over the past few years in the crime scene unit gave them no choice. Crime scene technicians "are just as important as cops in solving crimes," said Col. William A. Kelly, chief of the Police Department's administrative and technical services bureau.
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2011
At 9:30 p.m. Monday, three digital clocks stationed on a couple of barges in the Inner Harbor will put into motion a fireworks show that will turn Baltimore's skies into a kaleidoscopic landscape of colors and shapes, from half-moons to jellyfish. It will take just two seconds for one of the 1,400 fireworks to zoom 800 feet into the sky and explode. But what often seems like an all-too-brief show takes about 20 hours to design, and five days (and four technicians) to set up. "Just one minute of the show takes an hour to design on the computer," said Victor Weinmann, lead technician for Pyrotecnico, the company handling the effects.
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
MARC train ticket vending machines at Martin Airport, Edgewood, Aberdeen and Perryville are out of service, the Maryland Transportation Authority said Wednesday afternoon. Authorities have notified a technician. In the meantime, one-way and round-trip tickets may be purchased for cash on the train, a MARC alert said. cmcampbell@baltsun.com twitter.com/cmcampbell6
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Stanley D. Thrift Jr., a retired maintenance technician, died Friday of undetermined causes at Comemaugh Memorial Medical Center in Johnstown, Pa. He was 54. The results of an autopsy are pending, family members said. The son of an electrician and a school aide, Stanley David Thrift Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden. He attended Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Thrift briefly served in the Army in 1977 until being honorably discharged. He worked as a maintenance technician for Procter & Gamble, and later for Provident Bank, from which he retired on a medical disability several years ago. The Grantsville resident was an inveterate Ravens fan and enjoyed playing pool, fishing and spending time with his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Mary B. Scott, a former laboratory technician and longtime Severna Park resident, died June 30 of Parkinson's disease at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. She was 83. The daughter of an automobile salesman and a homemaker, Mary Lou Blake was born and raised in Niagara Falls, N.Y., where she graduated in 1948 from La Salle High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1952 in medical technology from the University of Buffalo, and the next year married Donald M. Scott, an electrical engineer.
SPORTS
By Nick Bedford, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Anthony "A.J. " Williams works in science by day and in the sweet science by night. He's accustomed to the good-natured verbal jabs he takes about his pursuit of a boxing career. "They actually just make jokes about it all day every day," the 26-year-old fighter said of his colleagues at Parexel International, a bio/pharmaceutical services organization, where he works as a research technician in Baltimore. "When I was an amateur, I had to be clean-shaved. So I came into work with a pencil mustache looking like I was someone's father.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Employees who were barred from their offices on the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus because of water contamination have been granted additional paid leave days, human resources officials said Friday. Employees in the campus' south building, which was closed two days, will get two days of added leave, said Pamela Paulk and Charlene Moore Hayes, executives for Hopkins' health system and university, in an email to employees who work at the North Baltimore office complex. "You will be able to use the two days as you wish," the human resources officials said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
John Holt surveyed the scene of a recent Columbia home burglary -- chairs and clothes strewn everywhere by thieves whose work was interrupted by the unexpected return of the homeowner.Holt is one of five Howard County crime lab technicians who work anonymously behind the police tape and flashing lights, gathering evidence at crime scenes. What they find is often crucial to breaking cases.At the house, Holt examined a bag of electronics equipment apparently dropped by the burglars."Your adrenalin is pumping," said Holt.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Using the national theme for EMS Week of "We're Ready -- Are You?" local emergency medical services personnel will kick off a celebration in Carroll County on Sunday.Activities during the week aim to educate the public about emergency medical care and how to use local emergency services.Other activities will include recognizing local EMS providers for their services throughout the year and highlighting ways to prevent injuries.Many Marylanders, including some from Carroll, will be honored May 27 at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore for their heroic, life-saving action or for distinguished service to the EMS community.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Four patients treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital are likely to have contracted hepatitis C from a rogue medical technician accused of stealing drugs and leaving contaminated needles behind, lab tests have confirmed. Special molecular testing on blood specimens done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the patients were infected with strains of hepatitis C closely related to infections linked to David Kwiatkowski, state health officials said Friday. The new cases bring to five the number of people in Maryland believed infected by Kwiatkowski.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
When David Kwiatkowski was found slurring his words and smelling of alcohol in a Boston-area hotel room littered with prescription pills late one July night, his life as a traveling medical technician had largely unraveled already. In his early 30s, he was living out of hotels, hopping among hospital jobs - including four in Maryland - and addicted to the powerful narcotic fentanyl, according to court and police documents. Federal investigators, meanwhile, were hot on his trail as they probed an outbreak of hepatitis C at a hospital where he had worked.
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