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BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | October 11, 1993
There is no such thing as a free lunch, and there may soon be no such thing as a free technical support call. As prices and profit margins fall in the personal computer software industry, some software makers are charging their customers for what was once "free" technical advice.The Microsoft Corp., for example, has revamped its technical support programs, and part of the plan includes new "priority" and "premium" fees for customers who call outside business hours seeking solutions to their problems.
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NEWS
February 17, 2014
Your recent editorial highlighted some serious concerns raised by Baltimore County's plan to "revolutionize classroom instruction" ( "Digital classrooms," Feb. 11). The launch of this technology airplane will cost $150 million, and there are serious questions about whether it will actually fly. So as the plane begins its take-off roll, I trust BCPS is fully aware that the runway is short and full of potholes. Among them are: 1. A lack of teacher confidence (fear of failure, lack of knowledge)
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BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | February 1, 1993
A friend was having problems with his Gateway computer. He called the company's technical support telephone number, which was busy. He called again, and again and again, and the number was always busy.It took dozens of calls over many days before he was able to speak to a human, he said. Happily, once a technician was on the line, he diagnosed and fixed the problem quickly.A veteran consultant who recommends powerful computers for the banking and financial industries tried calling a toll-free technical support number for the RS/6000 workstation division of IBM. The line was busy.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 2, 2004
BEFORE WE GET TO today's column, I have an important announcement regarding outsourcing. "Outsourcing" is a business expression that means, in layperson's terms, "sourcing out." It's a trend that started years ago in manufacturing, which is a business term that means "making things." You youngsters won't believe this, but there was a time when Americans actually made physical things called "products" right here in America. Workers would go to large grimy buildings called "factories," where they would take a raw material such as iron ore and perform industrial acts on it, such as "forging" and "smelting."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Antonucci and Mike Antonucci,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 11, 2002
If knowledge is power, technology-savvy U.S. teen-agers must feel like they're ready to run the world. So far, they're settling for an unprecedented level of influence at school and home. New research shows that children are providing vital technical support in the classroom, helping to install and maintain equipment that might otherwise remain buggy or unusable. At home, they're often the chief technology officers, overseeing everything from the type of computer, DVD player or speaker system their parents buy, to hooking up all the wires.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 20, 2000
When all else fails, support technicians sometimes suggest a humorous way to end the frustrating problems reported by new computer owners. It's called using the floor tool, meaning you lift your confused box overhead and smash it on the ground. To prevent such extreme measures, experts at numerous computer specialty magazines and Web sites offer wide-ranging, detailed evaluations of major computer manufacturers' fix-it abilities. Three of the most established are the annual surveys by PC World, PC Magazine and Winmag.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2001
Technically speaking, I get very little help from tech support lines these days. When I see news of diving PC sales, I start thinking that part of the reason is bad technical support. Who wants to spend close to $2,000 for a computer and then be made to feel like a rude and stupid intruder when you ask for help in using it? Maybe, if you are a beginner to computers, you thought it was just you. You figured the reason you aren't getting good help was because you don't know all the jargon.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Your recent editorial highlighted some serious concerns raised by Baltimore County's plan to "revolutionize classroom instruction" ( "Digital classrooms," Feb. 11). The launch of this technology airplane will cost $150 million, and there are serious questions about whether it will actually fly. So as the plane begins its take-off roll, I trust BCPS is fully aware that the runway is short and full of potholes. Among them are: 1. A lack of teacher confidence (fear of failure, lack of knowledge)
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 2, 2004
BEFORE WE GET TO today's column, I have an important announcement regarding outsourcing. "Outsourcing" is a business expression that means, in layperson's terms, "sourcing out." It's a trend that started years ago in manufacturing, which is a business term that means "making things." You youngsters won't believe this, but there was a time when Americans actually made physical things called "products" right here in America. Workers would go to large grimy buildings called "factories," where they would take a raw material such as iron ore and perform industrial acts on it, such as "forging" and "smelting."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Keating and Dan Keating,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 25, 1998
"NOTICE: Reading this column confirms your acceptance of the following terms:"You may not criticize or mock the contents of this article, or use the information or opinions herein in a manner contradictory to the best interest of this author, the publisher or their heirs and assigns, including the author's pet bunny, Muffin."No warranty is offered or implied as to the veracity of the contents, the suitability for any task or entertainment value."Any legal action against the author arising from the contents herein requires the prior written approval of the author's mother and can be filed only on a cloudy afternoon in Bahrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Antonucci and Mike Antonucci,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 11, 2002
If knowledge is power, technology-savvy U.S. teen-agers must feel like they're ready to run the world. So far, they're settling for an unprecedented level of influence at school and home. New research shows that children are providing vital technical support in the classroom, helping to install and maintain equipment that might otherwise remain buggy or unusable. At home, they're often the chief technology officers, overseeing everything from the type of computer, DVD player or speaker system their parents buy, to hooking up all the wires.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2001
Technically speaking, I get very little help from tech support lines these days. When I see news of diving PC sales, I start thinking that part of the reason is bad technical support. Who wants to spend close to $2,000 for a computer and then be made to feel like a rude and stupid intruder when you ask for help in using it? Maybe, if you are a beginner to computers, you thought it was just you. You figured the reason you aren't getting good help was because you don't know all the jargon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 20, 2000
When all else fails, support technicians sometimes suggest a humorous way to end the frustrating problems reported by new computer owners. It's called using the floor tool, meaning you lift your confused box overhead and smash it on the ground. To prevent such extreme measures, experts at numerous computer specialty magazines and Web sites offer wide-ranging, detailed evaluations of major computer manufacturers' fix-it abilities. Three of the most established are the annual surveys by PC World, PC Magazine and Winmag.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1999
Linking teacher pay to student performance, once a topic off-limits in public education, is now the hot new idea in public education, from the Rocky Mountains to Prince George's County.For Iris T. Metts, Prince George's new superintendent, the issue is familiar. As Delaware's education secretary until this year, she began negotiations with principals and teachers to develop an accountability program that includes standards for certification, training for new teachers and staff evaluation, the framework for performance pay."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Keating and Dan Keating,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 25, 1998
"NOTICE: Reading this column confirms your acceptance of the following terms:"You may not criticize or mock the contents of this article, or use the information or opinions herein in a manner contradictory to the best interest of this author, the publisher or their heirs and assigns, including the author's pet bunny, Muffin."No warranty is offered or implied as to the veracity of the contents, the suitability for any task or entertainment value."Any legal action against the author arising from the contents herein requires the prior written approval of the author's mother and can be filed only on a cloudy afternoon in Bahrain.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | April 5, 1998
ONE DAY in the summer of 1995, I sat down in front of a perfectly good PC and stuck a brand new Microsoft Windows 95 CD in the drive. Then I swallowed hard and clicked on Setup.To my utter amazement, the new operating system installed without a hitch -- a feat that's analogous to changing the engine in a car and having it start up the first time without so much as a hiccup.The honeymoon didn't last long. Over the last 2 1/2 years, I've fought more than a few skirmishes with Windows 95, and often wound up on the losing side.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, under pressure to offer some gesture of help when he meets with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev next week, may expand U.S. agricultural credits and technical assistance to the Soviet Union but won't announce a big aid package, officials said yesterday.The two presidents will meet in Madrid next week before jointly opening a Middle East peace conference. The Soviets cooperated in setting up the peace conference and in turn gained added stature in the Middle East by being part of it.The meeting, the two presidents' first since August's failed coup against Mr. Gorbachev, comes as the Soviets brace for winter food shortages amid the continuing collapse of their economy and the decline of the central government's authority.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | April 5, 1998
ONE DAY in the summer of 1995, I sat down in front of a perfectly good PC and stuck a brand new Microsoft Windows 95 CD in the drive. Then I swallowed hard and clicked on Setup.To my utter amazement, the new operating system installed without a hitch -- a feat that's analogous to changing the engine in a car and having it start up the first time without so much as a hiccup.The honeymoon didn't last long. Over the last 2 1/2 years, I've fought more than a few skirmishes with Windows 95, and often wound up on the losing side.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | October 11, 1993
There is no such thing as a free lunch, and there may soon be no such thing as a free technical support call. As prices and profit margins fall in the personal computer software industry, some software makers are charging their customers for what was once "free" technical advice.The Microsoft Corp., for example, has revamped its technical support programs, and part of the plan includes new "priority" and "premium" fees for customers who call outside business hours seeking solutions to their problems.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | February 1, 1993
A friend was having problems with his Gateway computer. He called the company's technical support telephone number, which was busy. He called again, and again and again, and the number was always busy.It took dozens of calls over many days before he was able to speak to a human, he said. Happily, once a technician was on the line, he diagnosed and fixed the problem quickly.A veteran consultant who recommends powerful computers for the banking and financial industries tried calling a toll-free technical support number for the RS/6000 workstation division of IBM. The line was busy.
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