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NEWS
February 2, 2004
Frederick Wilson Dierken, a former technical director for WBAL radio and television, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. He was 91 and a resident of Bel Air. He was born in Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute. He worked for his father's trucking company in the 1930s, then got a job with WBAL radio. Known to friends and family as "Will," Mr. Dierken served in the Navy during World War II. After his discharge in 1945, he returned to WBAL in time to see its television station go on the air in 1948, and to work on the live children's variety show Romper Room.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 19, 2012
Colleges Terps ' rally isn't enough in 6-5 baseball loss to No. 14 UCLA Tim Kiene hit a three-run homer in the fifth inning to help Maryland erase a 5-1 deficit, but No. 14 UCLA countered with a run in the bottom half and held the visiting Terps scoreless the rest of the way in a 6-5 baseball victory Saturday afternoon. Maryland opened the season Friday night by overcoming a one-run deficit with two runs in the ninth inning to beat the Bruins, 2-1. That victory broke the Terps ' 10-game losing streak in openers — their last season-opening win had come in 2001 against North Carolina A&T. Wrestling: Second-ranked Josh Asper (Hereford)
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NEWS
May 6, 1992
Tim Weinfeld's review on April 29 of "The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People" should have stated that Ira Domser was the technical director and the set designers were Steven Parsons and Sara Lundberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Nearly two years ago, performer Kel Millionie played the title role in an aerial drama about Icarus, who flew too close to the sun on wings made of wax. They melted, plunging the young man into the sea. Using trapezes, harnesses and aerial cloths, Millionie and eight other performers from Daydreams & Nightmares Aerial Theatre explored the story of what happened to the mythical Greek youth after his precipitous plunge. Millionie didn't realize that he himself was about to take his own trip to the bottom of the ocean.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2008
The first time he walked onto the stage of his high school in Baltimore, Kerry Brandon didn't realize he was about to find his vocation. He was hanging out with friends who were rehearsing for a musical. "I made the mistake of walking onto the stage at just the right moment - the director needed somebody," Brandon said. It was a small part. Brandon, a high school senior at the time, was on stage for less than a minute. But it was enough to catch the theater bug. Today, Brandon is technical director of Wilde Lake High School and the school's Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
C. H. GreenewaltDuPont presidentNEWARK, Del. -- Crawford H. Greenewalt, 91, who led the DuPont Co. into the atomic age as technical director of the plant where the first atomic bomb was built, died Monday of a cerebral hemorrhage at Christiana Hospital here.A memorial service was conducted yesterday for Mr. Greenewalt, who was DuPont's president from 1948 to 1962. He was DuPont's technical director during the building of the first plutonium plant in Hanford, Wash., as part of the federal government's Manhattan Project.
NEWS
November 23, 1993
* Emile Ardolino, 50, who won an Oscar for the dance documentary "He Makes Me Feel Like Dancin" and went on to direct the hit films "Dirty Dancin' " and "Sister Act," died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Ardolino Productions announced. His film version of the perennial George Balanchine ballet "Nutcracker" is scheduled for release tomorrow. His final project was a film production of "Gypsy" starring Bette Midler, which is to be shown on CBS Dec. 12 and in theaters after that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Nearly two years ago, performer Kel Millionie played the title role in an aerial drama about Icarus, who flew too close to the sun on wings made of wax. They melted, plunging the young man into the sea. Using trapezes, harnesses and aerial cloths, Millionie and eight other performers from Daydreams & Nightmares Aerial Theatre explored the story of what happened to the mythical Greek youth after his precipitous plunge. Millionie didn't realize that he himself was about to take his own trip to the bottom of the ocean.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 19, 2012
Colleges Terps ' rally isn't enough in 6-5 baseball loss to No. 14 UCLA Tim Kiene hit a three-run homer in the fifth inning to help Maryland erase a 5-1 deficit, but No. 14 UCLA countered with a run in the bottom half and held the visiting Terps scoreless the rest of the way in a 6-5 baseball victory Saturday afternoon. Maryland opened the season Friday night by overcoming a one-run deficit with two runs in the ninth inning to beat the Bruins, 2-1. That victory broke the Terps ' 10-game losing streak in openers — their last season-opening win had come in 2001 against North Carolina A&T. Wrestling: Second-ranked Josh Asper (Hereford)
FEATURES
By Brian McTavish and Brian McTavish,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2003
Love it or loathe it - or just go with it - the television laugh track remains a staple after five decades of viewer-assisted frivolity. For that triumph or disgrace, one person can be thanked or blamed. Charlie Douglass, who died in April at age 93, was a technical director of TV shows in the 1950s. He noticed that studio audiences didn't laugh as much when jokes were repeated after the first take. So the mechanical and electrical engineer, who helped develop a shipboard radar for the Navy in World War II, created a "laff box" that would supply recorded audience reaction.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2008
The first time he walked onto the stage of his high school in Baltimore, Kerry Brandon didn't realize he was about to find his vocation. He was hanging out with friends who were rehearsing for a musical. "I made the mistake of walking onto the stage at just the right moment - the director needed somebody," Brandon said. It was a small part. Brandon, a high school senior at the time, was on stage for less than a minute. But it was enough to catch the theater bug. Today, Brandon is technical director of Wilde Lake High School and the school's Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
February 2, 2004
Frederick Wilson Dierken, a former technical director for WBAL radio and television, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. He was 91 and a resident of Bel Air. He was born in Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute. He worked for his father's trucking company in the 1930s, then got a job with WBAL radio. Known to friends and family as "Will," Mr. Dierken served in the Navy during World War II. After his discharge in 1945, he returned to WBAL in time to see its television station go on the air in 1948, and to work on the live children's variety show Romper Room.
NEWS
November 23, 1993
* Emile Ardolino, 50, who won an Oscar for the dance documentary "He Makes Me Feel Like Dancin" and went on to direct the hit films "Dirty Dancin' " and "Sister Act," died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Ardolino Productions announced. His film version of the perennial George Balanchine ballet "Nutcracker" is scheduled for release tomorrow. His final project was a film production of "Gypsy" starring Bette Midler, which is to be shown on CBS Dec. 12 and in theaters after that.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
C. H. GreenewaltDuPont presidentNEWARK, Del. -- Crawford H. Greenewalt, 91, who led the DuPont Co. into the atomic age as technical director of the plant where the first atomic bomb was built, died Monday of a cerebral hemorrhage at Christiana Hospital here.A memorial service was conducted yesterday for Mr. Greenewalt, who was DuPont's president from 1948 to 1962. He was DuPont's technical director during the building of the first plutonium plant in Hanford, Wash., as part of the federal government's Manhattan Project.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
Tim Weinfeld's review on April 29 of "The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People" should have stated that Ira Domser was the technical director and the set designers were Steven Parsons and Sara Lundberg.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
A three-time Emmy winner from Carroll County has been nominated for a fourth award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for hercamera work on an HBO special.Donna Quante and five other cameraoperators were nominated in the category of technical director, camera, video control for the program "Sinbad: Brain Damaged."
FEATURES
June 11, 1991
"Crabs," the locally produced comedy show canceled this spring by Maryland Public Television, won seven regional Emmy Awards Saturday. Cited at the 33rd annual Capitol Region Emmy Awards ceremony were "Crabs" directors Donald Thoms and Doug Roberts, technical director Dwight Phillips, producer Dick George (two awards) and actor Jeff Baker (two awards).MPT also won honors for "The Best of "Outdoors Maryland," produced by Cynthia Fraser, and "The Civil War: A Region Divided," produced by Helen Jean Burn.
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