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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 2004
Charlotte Prouost of Lake Worth, Fla., asked for help locating a recipe for "Lightning Cake," which she remembers being in the Boston Cooking School Cookbook by Fannie Farmer dating back to the 1930s. Many readers, such as Joan Landsberg of Bend, Ore., still had original copies of this classic cookbook that had belonged to them or their mothers. Landsberg says she saved the cookbook because it was filled with recipes that she grew up with and with handwritten notes by her mother. The original Lightning Cake recipe, as published in the 1935 edition, did not specify a cake pan size, but later versions called for baking it in two 7-inch round pans or one 7-inch-by-10-inch pan. I chose to bake it in a single 8-inch round cake pan and it worked beautifully.
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FEATURES
May 28, 2013
Mobjack Imperial Crab Whitey Schmidt's "The Crab Cookbook" includes recipes for crab prepared nearly every way imaginable - including this classic take on crab imperial. "Crab imperial is just the dish for a warm summer's evening," writes Schmidt, recommending a light appetizer and fruit kabobs served alongside the crab. Recipe reprinted with permission. Makes 4 to 6 servings 1/2 cup plus one tablespoon milk, divided 1 1/2 teaspoons butter 1 tablespoon flour 1 egg yolk, well beaten 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/4 teaspoon celery salt 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons mayonnaise, divided 1 pound backfin crab meat Parsley 1. Preheat oven to 400°.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
Turn some baby-food prunes into a delicious prune cake. Gloria Hube of Riviera Beach asked for a recipe, and chef Gilles Syglowski chose the one sent in by Sandy Nank of McHenry, Ill., who wrote that Prune Cake had been her family's favorite for years. But he preferred the icing for this cake that was sent in by Karen Stephen of Owensboro, Ky.Nank's Prune Cake2 cups flour1 1/2 cups sugar1 cup Wesson oil4 eggs1/2 cup buttermilk1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon salt1 teaspoon cinnamon1 teaspoon allspice1 teaspoon nutmeg1 teaspoon vanilla1 jar junior baby-food prunes1 cup pecans, choppedPut flour, sugar, oil, eggs, buttermilk, soda, salt, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg in a bowl and mix well.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
New research has found that the Mediterranean diet is linked to a healthy heart. The diet is rich in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts. Thinking of switching or adopting some of the principals of the diet? Here is a Mediterranean diet recipe from the Mayo Clinic to get you started. Have a healthy recipe you'd like to share? Send it to andrea.walker@baltsun.com. Ingredients 1 small eggplant, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small yellow zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small green zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 6 medium mushrooms, sliced 1 sweet red pepper, seeded, cored and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups water 1 1/2 cups coarse polenta (corn grits)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | December 19, 2007
Thelma Maisenholder of Fallston was looking for a recipe for a Louisiana Ring Cake like the one her mother used to buy many years ago from Rice's Bakery in Baltimore. Irene Gozdziewski of Baltimore, 84, sent in a copy of the recipe that she clipped some time ago from the newspaper. She, too, remembers buying the cake from the Rice's deliveryman in the '40s and '50s. This is a classic, Southern-style ring cake. It is easy to make and is very moist and delicious with nice hints of orange and almond.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | November 28, 1999
Liquid marinades made with citrus juice, vinegar or wine are marvelous for breaking down the muscle fiber in tougher cuts of meat and for adding flavor. But here's the rub: Delicate fish can disintegrate in acidic liquids, and naturally tender cuts of meat need only a flavor boost -- not tenderizing.A better technique for flavoring such foods is to treat them to a gentle massage with dried herbs and spices.By making your own herb-and-spice rubs, you can custom-mix blends for beef, pork, lamb or fish.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
Dottie Denitto of Sykesville writes that she is searching for a recipe for coconut muffins like the ones served at Harpoon Hannah's Restaurant in Ocean City. "They are about the size of a regular cupcake and are simple, cakelike, sweet and delicious. I have tried a few recipes from books and the Internet, but none came close. Thanks for your help," she says. Volondia Kelly of Arnold responded: "I have a cousin who works at Harpoon Hannah's in Ocean City who gave me the recipe that I have enclosed and said that this is the one that the restaurant makes.
FEATURES
November 21, 1990
These flavorful seasoning blends don't contain any salt. They could be the perfect gift for the health-conscious person on your list. The recipes are from the American Heart Association's 1990 "Low-Fat, Low-Cholesterol Cookbook" edited by Scott M. Grundy.Store the seasonings in an airtight container in a cool, dry, dark place for up to six months.Herb Seasoning1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper1 tablespoon garlic powder1 teaspoon dried basil1 teaspoon dried marjoram1 teaspoon dried thyme1 teaspoon dried parsely1 teaspoon dried savory1 teaspoon mace1 teaspoon onion powder1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1 teaspoon powdered sageCombine all ingredients in medium bowl.
NEWS
By Lisa Gutierrez and Lisa Gutierrez,McClatchy-Tribune | December 13, 2006
With holiday cooking here, you're bound to be in this pickle at least once. "You believe you have everything you need and then, in the middle of preparation, you find out you're missing an ingredient," says Susan Mills-Gray, nutrition and health-education specialist for the University of Missouri Extension in Harrisonville. She keeps these three lists taped inside her favorite cookbook for quick reference. For the complete lists, visit the extension's Web site: extension.missouri.edu/extensioninfonet.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | April 15, 1992
Using all those hard-boiled, dyed Easter eggs can be a challenge for the thriftiest cook. Before you begin slicing and dicing, consider food safety.Like other perishable foods, do not eat eggs that have been out of refrigeration for more than 2 hours, says Kay Engelhardt, test kitchen supervisor for the American Egg Board in Park Ridge, Ill.Other egg safety tips include:* Wash your hands thoroughly before handling the eggs at every step, including cooking,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
One bite of a cool, crisp and bittersweet apple, and it's apparent why it is so intertwined with autumn. No fruit has had a more schizophrenic symbolic history - from the tantalizing tempter of Eve to the sign of appreciation for favorite teachers (and many meanings in between). At area farmers' markets, you will find the forbidden fruit in more varieties than you could have ever hoped to find at a supermarket. With some orchards selling dozens of varieties, it can get daunting trying to choose.
HEALTH
By Elaine Pelc, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Elaine Pelc weighs in on barbecuing. Grilling can be a very healthful cooking method that does not lack in flavor. The grill's flames help to develop rich, smoky flavors in some pretty standard fare. Cooking on the grill can be so versatile, you can prepare appetizers, side dishes, main courses and even dessert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
The flavor of a peach in hot weather can instantly transport you back to your childhood. The peach succumbing to the pressure of your grip while the juice cascades down your chin is a tactile memory that explodes in your cortex with every first bite of the season. Peaches can be had locally from June until September, and now is a great time to start cooking with them. Peaches are normally thought of as dessert fare, but when combined with more savory items, they can be used to create a mind-blowing appetizer at your next cookout.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
MaryAnne Walls from Knoxville, Tenn., has been searching for two years for a favorite coffee cake recipe she had misplaced. She said it was called Wellesley coffee cake and she thought that it came from a cookbook called "Come for Cocktails, Stay for Supper. " She said that it was made in a bundt pan, with a middle layer of cinnamon, brown sugar and chopped pecans. Barbara Blaker from Timonium, along with several other readers, had a copy of the cookbook Walls mentioned and sent in the recipe she was looking for. The book was written by Marian Burros and Lois Levine and published in 1970 and clearly was very popular.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Josie Kaestner from Monkton was hoping to find a recipe for oats used as savory side dish. She said she once had such a recipe but has lost it. For health reasons, she said is trying to get more oats in her diet and would like to add some variety to her usual oatmeal-for-breakfast routine. Nancy Duvall from Glenwood shared a recipe from the Quaker Oats Wholegrain Cookbook printed in 1981. She said this makes a flavorful side dish, either seasoned with herbs or combined with sauteed vegetables.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | April 18, 2012
Many of us grew up in the Friday night is Fish Night tradition. At our house on the North Shore of Boston, Fish Night could include cod fish cakes, creamed salmon on toast (aka Salmon Wiggle) or, most often, simply fried fish fillets. Not batter involved. Just a dunk in some sunny yellow cornmeal and a saute (in lard and later, vegetable shortening) in the skillet. Mashed potatoes and canned vegetables usually went with. The Friday Fish Night tradition continues, although there really is no longer a reason for it. And cornmeal-fried (in vegetable oil)
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | August 21, 1991
For really special salad dressings, make your own. You can use your favorite seasonings and avoid the artificial colors and other chem-lab ingredients in many bottled dressings.Oil-Free Tomato Dressing1 large plum tomato, seeded and coarsely chopped1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced1 medium green onion, finely chopped1 teaspoon Dijon mustard3 tablespoons red-wine vinegar1/4 teaspoon dried oregano, crushed1/4 teaspoon salt1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper1/4 teaspoon sugar3/4 cup V-8 juice1 tablespoon minced parsleyPut the tomato, garlic and green onion into a food processor and puree.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 20, 2011
Not being terribly "continental," we Americans tend to hit the supermarket once a week, rather than shopping for fresh stuff for dinner every day. Hence, the pantry. In your arsenal of fall-back foods to use for dinner when you can't get to the supermarket, there are undoubtedly a few cans of things designed to engender a quick family supper. Soups, undoubtedly. And tuna, most likely. Another goodie you might want to keep in stock is canned salmon. Canned pink or red salmon is even lower in calories than fresh salmon (less fat)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Dyann Shaver from Madras, Ore., was looking for a recipe she has lost for making a nontraditional type of barbecue chicken that used concentrated lemonade in the sauce. She said that she found the recipe in an article about barbequing in Better Homes and Garden magazine in the 1970s. Steve Newman from Santa Rosa, Calif., shared his recipe for making barbequed chicken with lemonade concentrate. He said that while concentrated lemonade may seem like a surprising ingredient this chicken never fails to please.
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