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By Barbara Turk, M.S | February 11, 1992
There are some things your kid admittedly doesn't do very well: Maybe he is a social or an athletic klutz. Whatever the problem, you want to help him get over it. And so, you try to jolt him into action by teasing: "Hey, look at you," you say. "You're gonna grow up to be the life of the party!" Then you laugh just to let him know you're only teasing.You're not teasing; you're cruelly ridiculing. Sarcastic remarks like that hurt, and the ridicule they heap on your child can leave wounds of rejection that will keep him from ever being the life of anybody's party.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sunny Sighed remembers her first exposure to modern burlesque very well. She loved it, but never dreamed she'd soon be a part of it. Stripping off her clothes in front of an audience - well, even for a performer trained in acting, singing and dancing, that seemed a bit much. "I at first could not imagine being able to do it myself," she says of the night about eight years ago when she first saw local legends Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey (real names: Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle)
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By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 1997
How should I react when my daughter tells me that kids make fun of her ears for sticking out? Her dad believes that the teasing will only get worse and is prepared to have plastic surgery done. To me, the idea of plastic surgery seems ridiculous. I would appreciate some advice.-- Debbie Tavenner Columbus, Ohio"Generally when a child is teased about her appearance, it's important for parents to offer understanding about the distress she feels," says Jan Hughes, a professor of educational psychology at Texas A&M.A parent could say, "The teasing hurt your feelings, didn't it?"
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | November 26, 2013
WWE Raw ended Monday night with Randy Orton holding up both the WWE and World Heavyweight titles, with a match set for the TLC pay-per-view where both titles will be on the line. It must be noted that this hasn't been billed as a "unification" match yet, implying right now that the winner will hold both titles and not make them one single championship. The timing is interesting. It will certainly boost interest for TLC, a pay-per-view that isn't a traditional big hit for WWE. To generalize that point, what might raise eyebrows is the fact that we aren't seeing a match of this magnitude on a bigger pay-per-view stage, leading me to believe that we won't get a definitive winner at TLC and that the saga of crowning a unified champion (if that is the path that will be taken)
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 1996
My 6- and 4-year-old sons are much shorter than average. My older son is already being teased. How can I build their self-esteem? What do you say to the teasing?A mother from Los Altos, Calif.As much as your parental instinct tells you to search to the ends of the Earth to find some armor for your child, what you reallyneed to do is calm down."Don't escalate this into a world-class drama," says Nathaniel Branden, author of "The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem" (Bantam, $22.95)."If you approach this with the belief that teasing is a calamity, you can turn teasing into a calamity," says Dr. Branden, a psychologist in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer returned to the state Board of Public Works yesterday for the first time since he was hospitalized with an irregular heartbeat, and faced some affectionate teasing from the rest of the board. His welcome included the showing of a video featuring Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. mimicking Schaefer by appearing to doze at the comptroller's desk and munch handfuls of Junior Mints candies. "You know, you lied so much on that tape," Schaefer told Ehrlich when the lights came back on. "I do not sleep in the office.
NEWS
By Lynn Smith and Lynn Smith,los angeles times | December 24, 2000
Are you concerned that other kids are calling your child "cactus head"? Worried that your son is telling his playmate he "throws like a girl?" Or do you flinch at parents who hold out a cookie, then pull it back so their child can't reach it? Relax, says researcher Dacher Keltner, professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. Most teasing is not only benign, but can also help children negotiate conflicts, socialize with one another and express affection. Most studies on teasing acknowledge some forms have positive benefits, but they tend to focus on the dark side -- when teasing crosses the line into bullying or harassment.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 17, 1999
BOSTON -- For a few minutes, the justices seemed to be going down memory lane. Bad memory lane. The word bandied about the Supreme Court chambers Tuesday was "teasing.""I'm sure schoolchildren nationwide tease each other," said Justice Sandra Day O'Connor."Boys tease girls because they are girls, and vice versa," Justice David H. Souter agreed.You might have thought that the classmate known as G.F. was just a Georgie Porgie who kissed the girls and made them cry.Indeed, Davis vs. Monroe County Board of Education began with two 10-year-olds, G.F. and LaShonda Davis, who sat side by side in a fifth-grade Georgia classroom.
SPORTS
January 4, 2006
"I pitched against teams from Puerto Rico and Taiwan before big crowds when I was 10 years old. ... I've kind of always been that kid, the guy with the pressure on him. It's not that I like the attention, but I do like having the game on me." Matt Leinart Southern California quarterback, on how his days as a youth league pitcher prepared him for his role with the Trojans "It's going to be fun to try. No question about it. This makes you hungry." Mike Martz Former St. Louis Rams coach, on moving on and trying to build a team into a contender "He's our team captain?
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | October 6, 2007
As a dating columnist, I wade through many books and TV shows of little redeeming value, all in the name of research. Most are innocuous how-to guides and stories of dating pratfalls. However, one book, The Game, had me reeling. Author Neil Strauss stumbles into the pick-up underworld and befriends pick-up artist Mystery, now of VH1's The Pick-Up Artist fame. It's sleaze city. These men, surely insecure geeks when they were younger, study social dynamics and use their insight, canned phrases and questionable techniques to "kiss-close" - make out or more - as many women as they possibly can. It reeks of manipulation and game-playing, with a side of misogyny.
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By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 23, 2013
It's one thing for a letter that you thought was kind-of private to go viral . A letter where you ask your fellow sorority sisters at the University of Maryland if they are "_____ retarded" and in which you say "I WILL _____ ASSAULT YOU!" because you believe them to be "awkward" and "weird. " But you know you're a true Internet sensation when a Real Hollywood Star jumps into the fray. So, congratulations to the Delta Gamma whose nasty and profanity-laced letter to her sisters exploded on the web recently: Michael Shannon of "Boardwalk Empire" has helped you arrive with a dramatic reading on Funny or Die ( Warning: The video contains explicit language )
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 25, 2012
I'll tell you what annoys me: the buy-one-get-one-free deal on strawberries at the supermarket. First of all, you must have the store's bonus card to get the deal. Plus, they really don't want you to know the price of the first item, so they print it so small on a card so far across the produce bin that you need a drone with advanced optics to fly over and read it. Since we're on the subject, I'll tell you what else annoys me: •Seven dollars for a medium-size bag of popcorn at the movies in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
Where the water quickens just before the bridge, a man is stacking stones. Squinting in the July sun, he lifts a fat rock from the river, balances it on a gray slab and reaches into the warm shallows for another. "I do what the rock wants to do." says Teddy Betts, a 53-year-old special education teacher. "This is the summer of no stress for me." Since school let out, Betts has spent many hours soaked to the knees in this stretch of the Patapsco near the Main Street bridge in Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 29, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO-- --The now-concluded Maryland season should go down in its history as the Year of the Tease, even more than the three previous seasons. And last night's Emerald Bowl was their season in a nutshell - a 60-minute tease. In the long run, the Terps did remind you that they were, after all, a .500 team, and now a below-.500 team, for the third time in four years. You saw all their promise and all the ways they can let you down in one night, against an Oregon State team that was better, but not that much better.
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | October 6, 2007
As a dating columnist, I wade through many books and TV shows of little redeeming value, all in the name of research. Most are innocuous how-to guides and stories of dating pratfalls. However, one book, The Game, had me reeling. Author Neil Strauss stumbles into the pick-up underworld and befriends pick-up artist Mystery, now of VH1's The Pick-Up Artist fame. It's sleaze city. These men, surely insecure geeks when they were younger, study social dynamics and use their insight, canned phrases and questionable techniques to "kiss-close" - make out or more - as many women as they possibly can. It reeks of manipulation and game-playing, with a side of misogyny.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- During a news conference yesterday after his surprise visit to Iraq, President Bush engaged in a little repartee with reporters, as he often does. When he called on Peter Wallsten of the Los Angeles Times, he commented on the reporter's sunglasses. "Are you going to ask that question with shades on?" the president asked. When Wallsten offered to take them off, Bush said, "I'm interested in the shade look, seriously" and noted that "there's no sun." Wallsten later told another reporter that he suffers from macular degeneration, has lost most of his central vision and needs the glasses for protection from glare.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1993
FORT WAYNE, Ind. -- Little Amy Hagadorn wanted only one day without teasing.Since the 9-year-old with cerebral palsy made her plea to Santa last week, her days have been a dream of calls, cards, advice, gifts and good wishes from across the country and even Europe and Australia.Her story appeared first in the Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, then ++ on Cable News Network and in newspapers nationwide, from Philadelphia to Chicago, Indianapolis to Denver. The Pacific edition of Stars & Stripes picked it up, too. Monday night, Amy was interviewed by public radio's "All Things Considered."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1995
Teasing, petty thefts, shoving in the halls -- such adolescent conflicts are defused in an average of 12 minutes by student mediators at the Hannah More School for emotionally disabled children.Last week, seven teen-agers -- some of whom had been through mediation themselves -- completed a two-day training session by acting out conflicts, practicing listening skills, and brainstorming solutions."Students are hungry for opportunities to serve," said Paul Kaplan, the school's director of clinical services.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2006
Before the backstage mirror, barely dressed dancers fret about limp curls, gooseflesh and uneven panty fringe. But Catherine Bohne stands apart from them in her four-inch-high Mary Janes, contemplating a more serious problem: Her cat ate her pasties. It happened about 11:30 p.m. Friday, the eve of this, her first-ever burlesque performance, when the two red, sparkly stars were to be all that stood between her and total toplessness. She discovered their mangled remains on the floor of the spare bedroom, cursed out the cat and despaired.
NEWS
By CAREY GOLDBERG and CAREY GOLDBERG,BOSTON GLOBE | January 6, 2006
Meditation seems to energize the sleep-deprived. It seems to help with concentration. It even seems to bolster the very structure of the brain as we age. Neuroscientists presenting their latest research at a convention of 34,000 colleagues in November had so much praise for meditation that it was starting to sound like a mantra. Their work fits into a growing body of data that tries to bring modern science to bear on age-old methods to quiet the mind. Enthusiasts have long praised the health benefits of meditative practices such as chanting, yoga, and prayer.
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