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NEWS
August 22, 2001
Bill and Barbara Andrews, partners in The Source Unlimited, an Ellicott City interior design business, are renovating the first, second and third floors of their historic building at 8081 Main St. and will open a 19th-century English tearoom on the ground floor. The ground-floor space was seriously damaged in the 1999 fire on Main Street. Since then, The Source Unlimited has continued to occupy the second- and third-floor spaces. Now, as part of the renovations, the building's second and third floors will be expanded and a deck will be built over the Tiber River.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 10, 2006
Charlene Johns stood at the end of a table putting mounds of red raspberry jam, lemon curd and imported Devonshire clotted cream onto small saucers. Next she moved on to the cheddar cheese and olive spread. Beside her, Tami Everitt made lavender cookies and scones. The two women were preparing food for an English-style tea they were serving at Piccadilly's Tearoom, a Victorian tea parlor that opened four weeks ago on East Main Street in Taneytown. "I wanted this place to be America's crown jewel," said Janice Shehan, who co-owns Piccadilly's with her husband, James Shehan Jr. "I wanted an upscale English tearoom that could satisfy American women."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
To those out there who think high tea is some fancy anachronistic event attended only by white-gloved old ladies who barely have room for three cookies, I'm about to set you straight. Better yet, I'm going to tell you where you can partake of the most flawless high tea this side of the pond: the Thir-Tea-First Street Cafe and Tea Room in Waverly. In December, Denise Washington took over the funky old purple building that used to house the Old Waverly History Exchange & Tea Room. With all due respect to the beloved predecessor, the newcomer is even better.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
For more than five years, there's been something brewing in Bel Air, and it all started with a prayer. Erin Bradley and Janet Meyers, owners of Tea by Two on South Main Street, have created a tearoom filled with soft music, bright decor and tables set with china. The founders are best friends who met about 20 years ago. Bradley and Meyers worked in Hunt Valley for an international insurance company. They enjoyed their jobs, they said, but they got to that point where they wanted something else.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2002
NOT TOO LONG ago, Inspirations, a booming gift basket company, and Gypsy's Tearoom took over the space formerly occupied by Winchester Country Inn on Stoner Avenue. With the move, the tearoom got a setting with the historic charm it deserved, and the gift basket company/boutique had the room it needed to grow. What most people don't know about the move is that it also represents a heartfelt partnership between two friends who wanted to give adults with special needs consistent, real-life training opportunities in a nurturing environment.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
The past in its most decorous form is never so remote that Alice Ann Finnerty cannot touch some fragment of it daily in her Hampden consignment shops. Perhaps it's logical that she would raise her new life project on a foundation of memory. It had to be a tearoom, as Finnerty tells the story, if only to appease a persistent nostalgic impulse. She would restore some elements of a day when the Hutzler Brothers Co. meant not just a fine downtown Baltimore shopping experience, but also the prospect of enjoying an afternoon in the department store's sixth-floor restaurant, the Colonial, known also as the tearoom.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 10, 2006
Charlene Johns stood at the end of a table putting mounds of red raspberry jam, lemon curd and imported Devonshire clotted cream onto small saucers. Next she moved on to the cheddar cheese and olive spread. Beside her, Tami Everitt made lavender cookies and scones. The two women were preparing food for an English-style tea they were serving at Piccadilly's Tearoom, a Victorian tea parlor that opened four weeks ago on East Main Street in Taneytown. "I wanted this place to be America's crown jewel," said Janice Shehan, who co-owns Piccadilly's with her husband, James Shehan Jr. "I wanted an upscale English tearoom that could satisfy American women."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
A capacity lunch crowd descended on the reopened Woman's Industrial Exchange yesterday and consumed all its luncheon salads -- chicken, crab and shrimp -- then carried out every cake, pie and brownie, leaving only a few crumbs in its bakery case."
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Dressed in pristine cooking whites, Yvonne Barber has been whipping up tasty chicken salad, crab cakes and little beaten biscuits at historic Hampton Mansion in Towson for 43 years.She has served the traditional Maryland fare to generations of visitors who have enjoyed leisurely lunches and special occasions in the quaint tearoom that recalls a genteel era of sherry sipping and white-jacketed waiters.But the long-standing Baltimore-area tradition is about to end.A week ago, the National Park Service, which runs the 1790 Georgian mansion where the tearoom is tucked into the original kitchen, decided to eliminate the concession as of Dec. 31. Officials say a restaurant is not needed and poses a fire hazard.
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
There are few hours more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea.- Henry James Seated at a table adorned with a fancy, flowered cloth and elegant white porcelain dishes, Margaret Sherer reaches with petite golden tongs for the two lumps of sugar that will sweeten her afternoon. Today, Sherer, 57, has opted, as the English say, to take tea. "I needed a peaceful place to be," she says as she sips the aromatic sweet cherry tea she has chosen from a menu that includes Earl Grey, chai and a number of fruit teas.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Once unthinkable, hip modernity is arriving at a venerable downtown lunch spot: a plasma TV, a chartreuse paint scheme, chipotle mayo and self-service. The Woman's Industrial Exchange's former tearoom, for more than a century a genteel and leisurely midday rendezvous for a petite platter of chicken salad, tomato aspic, deviled egg and lemon tart, reopens Oct. 18 as the Chef's Express. The color scheme is "city chartreuse" and "fresh pear," with an exposed stainless-steel kitchen. The new restaurant's operators promise a plasma TV tuned to food channels.
NEWS
July 3, 2005
Elizabeth S. Lego, the retired manager of a Roland Park tearoom and soda fountain who later sold candy for the Maron Co., died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She had lived in Annapolis before moving to Glen Arm four years ago. She was 92. Born Elizabeth Smith in Northeast Baltimore, she managed the old Delvale Dairies restaurant in Roland Park Shopping Center in the 4800 block of Roland Ave. for more than 30 years. She then worked in sales for the old Maron Candy Co. on Charles Street in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Chisha Johnson fondly remembers the daily ritual of afternoon tea at the boarding schools she attended while growing up in England as the daughter of a diplomat. Now the Columbia resident enjoys introducing the tea habit to her 11-year-old daughter, Elysha. "We love tea," Johnson said as she and Elysha sat at a corner table on a recent afternoon at Tea on the Tiber, which opened last month on Main Street in historic Ellicott City. "It's a girls' day, just a time for us," said Johnson, who nibbled on a scone and sipped a chai brew while her daughter ate a cinnamon roll with an apricot blend.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
The dumbwaiter is gone, a microwave is in the stainless steel kitchen and the old lunchroom wall colors of creamy yellow and bright blue have been exchanged for a soft gray. But a much-needed makeover of Baltimore's Woman's Industrial Exchange won't threaten tradition: The chicken salad, deviled egg and tomato aspic will remain unchanged, as will the scruffy black-and-white tile floor and the two fireplaces. The establishment, a fixture at East Pleasant and North Charles streets since 1887, has been closed all year for renovations costing $750,000.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
The past in its most decorous form is never so remote that Alice Ann Finnerty cannot touch some fragment of it daily in her Hampden consignment shops. Perhaps it's logical that she would raise her new life project on a foundation of memory. It had to be a tearoom, as Finnerty tells the story, if only to appease a persistent nostalgic impulse. She would restore some elements of a day when the Hutzler Brothers Co. meant not just a fine downtown Baltimore shopping experience, but also the prospect of enjoying an afternoon in the department store's sixth-floor restaurant, the Colonial, known also as the tearoom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2003
After four years of vacancy, the historic Reynolds Tavern is back in business in Annapolis. Not only that, but it's been expanding just about monthly since its November rebirth. British immigrants Andrew and Jill Pettit bought the 1746 building at 7 Church Circle last spring. They spent the next six months renovating. Now open are the Sly Fox Pub in the cellar; the Reynolds Tea Room on the first floor; and a small inn - one room and two suites ($220-$320 a night) - upstairs. Coming any day now is a patisserie on the first floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 28, 2002
Athol Fugard play at Vagabond Players Athol Fugard's rawly confessional 1982 play, Master Harold ... and the Boys, opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players. Set in 1950, in a tearoom in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, the charged drama focuses on the relationship between two black waiters and the white teen-age son of the tearoom's owners. Under Steve Yeager's direction, the Vagabonds' production stars Michael A. Kane, G. Scott Spence and Alex Borinsky. Show times at the Vagabonds, 806 S. Broadway, are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays and 7 p.m. March 29. The play runs through March 30. Tickets are $12. For more information, call 410-563-9135.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Chisha Johnson fondly remembers the daily ritual of afternoon tea at the boarding schools she attended while growing up in England as the daughter of a diplomat. Now the Columbia resident enjoys introducing the tea habit to her 11-year-old daughter, Elysha. "We love tea," Johnson said as she and Elysha sat at a corner table on a recent afternoon at Tea on the Tiber, which opened last month on Main Street in historic Ellicott City. "It's a girls' day, just a time for us," said Johnson, who nibbled on a scone and sipped a chai brew while her daughter ate a cinnamon roll with an apricot blend.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
Carrie Margaret Geraghty, whose 75 years as a waitress in downtown Baltimore included a quarter-century at Charles Street's Woman's Industrial Exchange, died of an infection Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Towson resident was 95. Asked to fill in for two weeks at the landmark exchange in the summer of 1972, she stayed on and continued serving chicken salad platters and charlotte russe desserts for lunch for the next 25 years. She retired two months' shy of her 90th birthday. Born in Baltimore, Carrie Willback was raised on Aiken Street and attended St. John's Parochial School.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
Annapolitans will soon be able to sip tea or hoist a beer at the 18th-century Reynolds Tavern building on Church Circle. The city's Board of Appeals agreed Tuesday night to allow Jill and Andrew Petit of Arnold to convert the vacant building into a pub and tearoom with upstairs hotel suites. The Petits' establishment will be allowed to have a seating capacity of 246 - including 120 seats on an outdoor terrace, a major point of contention for some downtown residents. The couple said they needed the additional seating to make their business plan work for the circa 1747 building that has been vacant for four years.
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